Zeeland, Michigan

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Zeeland, Michigan
City
Location of Zeeland within Ottawa County, Michigan
Coordinates: 42°48′45″N 86°01′07″W / 42.81250°N 86.01861°W / 42.81250; -86.01861Coordinates: 42°48′45″N 86°01′07″W / 42.81250°N 86.01861°W / 42.81250; -86.01861
CountryUnited States
StateMichigan
CountyOttawa
Government
 • MayorKevin Klynstra
Area[1]
 • City3.01 sq mi (7.80 km2)
 • Land2.99 sq mi (7.74 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation649 ft (198 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • City5,504
 • Estimate (2012[3])5,558
 • Density1,840.8/sq mi (710.7/km2)
 • Metro1,306,768 (Grand Rapids-Muskegon-Holland MSA)
Time zoneEST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code49464
Area code(s)616
FIPS code26-89260[4]
GNIS feature ID1616917[5]
Websitehttp://www.ci.zeeland.mi.us/
 
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Zeeland, Michigan
City
Location of Zeeland within Ottawa County, Michigan
Coordinates: 42°48′45″N 86°01′07″W / 42.81250°N 86.01861°W / 42.81250; -86.01861Coordinates: 42°48′45″N 86°01′07″W / 42.81250°N 86.01861°W / 42.81250; -86.01861
CountryUnited States
StateMichigan
CountyOttawa
Government
 • MayorKevin Klynstra
Area[1]
 • City3.01 sq mi (7.80 km2)
 • Land2.99 sq mi (7.74 km2)
 • Water0.02 sq mi (0.05 km2)
Elevation649 ft (198 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • City5,504
 • Estimate (2012[3])5,558
 • Density1,840.8/sq mi (710.7/km2)
 • Metro1,306,768 (Grand Rapids-Muskegon-Holland MSA)
Time zoneEST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code49464
Area code(s)616
FIPS code26-89260[4]
GNIS feature ID1616917[5]
Websitehttp://www.ci.zeeland.mi.us/

Zeeland (/ˈzlɨnd/ ZEE-lənd) is a city in Ottawa County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 5,504 at the 2010 census. The city is located at the western edge of Zeeland Charter Township which is politically independent. Its name is derived from the Dutch province of Zeeland.

History[edit]

In 1847, nearly 500 Dutch citizens sailed for America ostensibly to achieve religious freedom, although their decision to immigrate was probably also influenced by other factors, such as their failure to thrive under dire economic conditions in their home province of Zeeland, Netherlands[6] and their opposition to modern scientific and social advances of the time (e.g., contraception, vaccination, insurance, and chemical fertilizers).[7]

The emigrants were led by Jannes van de Luijster, a wealthy landowner who sold his holdings in the Netherlands to advance money for the members to pay their debts and buy passage to America.[7] Their settlement, some 16,000 acres (65 km2) of land once occupied by the Odawa people, was named after their home province of Zeeland.

Van de Luyster arranged for three ships to sail for the United States. He came on the first ship, arriving on June 27, 1847. He was followed by the Steketee group on July 4, and Reverend Van Der Meulen’s group on August 1 of that year. The total number of settlers was 457.

Dutch settlements in Michigan.

The first building was a church. The town of Zeeland was platted in 1849, and the school district was organized the following year.

Within twenty-five years, Zeeland had acquired a sawmill, a wagon factory, blacksmith shops, grocery stores, and a post office.

The village officially became a city in 1907 with a population of almost 3,000. There was a two-story brick kindergarten building, a two-story brick grade school, and a brick house building. The city also had four furniture factories, one large manufacturing plant, and several mills and smaller manufacturing industries.[8]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.01 square miles (7.80 km2), of which, 2.99 square miles (7.74 km2) is land and 0.02 square miles (0.05 km2) is water.[1] The town itself is located on a hill giving the city a higher elevation compared to the surrounding township land. Much of the outlying areas contain farmland and forest.

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 5,504 people, 2,246 households, and 1,426 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,840.8 inhabitants per square mile (710.7 /km2). There were 2,446 housing units at an average density of 818.1 per square mile (315.9 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.8% White, 1.1% African American, 0.4% Native American, 1.3% Asian, 1.3% from other races, and 2.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.4% of the population.

There were 2,246 households of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.5% were non-families. 33.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.04.

The median age in the city was 38.8 years. 25.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.6% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.8% were from 25 to 44; 20.6% were from 45 to 64; and 22.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 44.8% male and 55.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 5,805 people, 2,283 households, and 1,490 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,927.7 per square mile (744.6/km²). There were 2,389 housing units at an average density of 793.3 per square mile (306.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.90% White, 0.59% African American, 0.14% Native American, 1.31% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.10% from other races, and 1.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.63% of the population.

There were 2,283 households out of which 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.6% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.7% were non-families. 32.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city, ages of the residents spanned a broad range with 26.2% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 26.5% from 25 to 44, 16.1% from 45 to 64, and 23.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 83.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,611, and the median income for a family was $53,227. Males had a median income of $35,288 versus $26,913 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,801. About 2.8% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.8% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Zeeland West High School and athletic fields
K-12 public schools
Private schools
Higher education
School issues

Industry[edit]

Zeeland is home to several world renowned companies. Those in the city of Zeeland include:

Sports achievements[edit]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-25. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Zeeland, Michigan
  6. ^ Robert P. Swierenga (13 March 1997, Lecture of Dr. Robert P. Swierenga, Research Professor, A.C. Van Raalte Institute for Historical Studies, Hope College, Holland Museum Sesquicentennial Lecture Series, Holland). "By the Sweat of our Brow: Economic Aspects of the Dutch Immigration to Michigan". swierenga.com. Retrieved 2014-01-07. 
  7. ^ a b Robert P. Swierenga (6 February 1997, presented to the Zeeland Historical Society). "From Zeeland to Zeeland in 1847". swierenga.com. Retrieved 2012-12-17. 
  8. ^ "History of Zeeland". Macatawa Bay Area History & Heritage. Luann Hughes DeVries. 2003. Retrieved 2007-01-15. 
  9. ^ "Girls Swimming & Diving Team Champions 1925-2012." Michigan High School Athletic Association. Retrieved 2012-02-23.

External links[edit]