Zambales

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Zambales
Province
Provincial Capitol in Iba, decorated for the Mango Festival
Provincial Capitol in Iba, decorated for the Mango Festival
Flag of Zambales
Flag
Official seal of Zambales
Seal
Motto: Sulong Zambales! Arangkada Zambaleño
Map of the Philippines with Zambales highlighted
Map of the Philippines with Zambales highlighted
Coordinates: 15°20′N 120°10′E / 15.333°N 120.167°E / 15.333; 120.167Coordinates: 15°20′N 120°10′E / 15.333°N 120.167°E / 15.333; 120.167
CountryPhilippines
RegionCentral Luzon (Region III)
Founded1578
CapitalIba
Government
 • TypeProvince of the Philippines
 • GovernorHermogenes Ebdane (Sulong Zambales Party)
 • Vice GovernorRamon G. Lacbain II (Sulong Zambales Party)
Area[1]
 • Total3,830.83 km2 (1,479.09 sq mi)
Area rank36th out of 80
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total534,443
 • Rank37th out of 80
 • Density140/km2 (360/sq mi)
 • Density rank43rd out of 80
 Excluding Olongapo City
Divisions
 • Independent cities1
 • Component cities0
 • Municipalities13
 • Barangays247
including independent cities:
 • Districts1st and 2nd districts of Zambales (shared with Olongapo City)
Time zonePHT (UTC+8)
ZIP code2200 to 2213
Dialing code47
ISO 3166 codePH-ZMB
Spoken languagesSambal, Ilokano, Pangasinan, Tagalog, Kapampangan, English
Websitewww.zambalesnow.com
 
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Zambales
Province
Provincial Capitol in Iba, decorated for the Mango Festival
Provincial Capitol in Iba, decorated for the Mango Festival
Flag of Zambales
Flag
Official seal of Zambales
Seal
Motto: Sulong Zambales! Arangkada Zambaleño
Map of the Philippines with Zambales highlighted
Map of the Philippines with Zambales highlighted
Coordinates: 15°20′N 120°10′E / 15.333°N 120.167°E / 15.333; 120.167Coordinates: 15°20′N 120°10′E / 15.333°N 120.167°E / 15.333; 120.167
CountryPhilippines
RegionCentral Luzon (Region III)
Founded1578
CapitalIba
Government
 • TypeProvince of the Philippines
 • GovernorHermogenes Ebdane (Sulong Zambales Party)
 • Vice GovernorRamon G. Lacbain II (Sulong Zambales Party)
Area[1]
 • Total3,830.83 km2 (1,479.09 sq mi)
Area rank36th out of 80
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total534,443
 • Rank37th out of 80
 • Density140/km2 (360/sq mi)
 • Density rank43rd out of 80
 Excluding Olongapo City
Divisions
 • Independent cities1
 • Component cities0
 • Municipalities13
 • Barangays247
including independent cities:
 • Districts1st and 2nd districts of Zambales (shared with Olongapo City)
Time zonePHT (UTC+8)
ZIP code2200 to 2213
Dialing code47
ISO 3166 codePH-ZMB
Spoken languagesSambal, Ilokano, Pangasinan, Tagalog, Kapampangan, English
Websitewww.zambalesnow.com

Zambales is a province of the Philippines located in the Central Luzon region. Its capital is Iba. Zambales borders Pangasinan to the north, Tarlac and Pampanga to the east, Bataan to the south and the South China Sea to the west. With a land area of 3,830.83 km2, Zambales is the second largest among the seven provinces of Central Luzon. The province is noted for its mangoes, which are abundant from January to April.

Zambales is served by the Subic Bay International Airport, which is located in Cubi Point in the Subic Bay Freeport Zone. The Freeport Zone is host to many tourist attractions which include casinos, beach resorts, parks, beachside huts and cottages and historical sites.

History[edit]

The area now occupied by Zambales was first explored by the Spanish in 1572, led by Juan de Salcedo. Among the earliest towns founded were Subic (1572), Botolan (1572), Masinloc (1607), Iba (1611), and Santa Cruz (1612).[3] Masinloc became the province's first capital. However, the capital was moved among the last three towns above during its history before settling in Iba, due to its strategic location. The first civil governor of Zambales during the American era was the Honorable Potenciano Lesaca from 1901-1903.

The province's name came from the word zambal, which is a Hispanized term for Sambali. Zambal refers to the language spoken by the early Austronesian inhabitants of the place. A contending version states that the name was derived from the word samba, meaning worship, because the Spanish supposedly found the native inhabitants to be highly superstitious; worshiping the spirits of their ancestors.

Zambales Day is celebrated every August 30.

Geography[edit]

Physical[edit]

Zambales lies on the western shores of Luzon island along the South China Sea. Its shoreline is very ragged, and features many coves and inlets. The Zambales Mountains, the mountain range on the eastern part of the province occupies about 60% of its total land area. Subic Bay, in the southern end of the province, provides a natural harbor, and was chosen as the location of the U.S. Naval Base Subic Bay. The peak of Mount Pinatubo lies near the tripoint of Zambales, Pampanga, and Tarlac provinces.[4] This volcano, once considered dormant, erupted violently in 1991 blowing off its summit, leaving a caldera (now filled with Lake Pinatubo), on the mountains of Botolan, Zambales. A vast portion of the province acquired desert-like features after being buried by more than 20 feet (6.1 m) deep of lahar.

Climate[edit]

Zambales has two pronounced seasons: dry from October to June, and wet from July to September.

Subdivisions[edit]

Zambales is subdivided into 13 municipalities and 1 city. Olongapo City is a highly urbanized city and administers itself autonomously from the province. Panatag Shoal (Scarborough Shoal) a Philippine-claimed EEZ, is a designated part of the province.

Demographics[edit]

Population census of Zambales
YearPop.  ±% p.a.  
1990369,665—    
1995389,512+1.05%
2000433,542+2.16%
2007493,085+1.86%
2010534,443+2.72%
Excluding Olongapo City
Source: National Statistics Office[2]

The Aetas of Mount Pinatubo were the earliest inhabitants of what is now the province of Zambales. They were later displaced by the Sambal, an Austronesian people after whom the province is named. Many Sambal still believe in superstitions and mysteries that have been handed down through the generations.

The Sambal, the Tagalogs, the Ilokanos, and the Kapampangans today constitute the four largest ethnic groups in Zambales; these identities may and do, however, overlap with one another due to intermarriage[5] and other factors. Most of the people of southern Zambales are migrants from different parts of the country owing to the influx of job opportunities brought on by the U.S Subic Naval Base (San Antonio and Subic) during the American regime of the country. Many people found jobs and permanently settled there. The presence of the Americans greatly influenced the inhabitants in the province, from their tastes in food, clothing, and style.

Respect for elders is still observed. Town fiestas honoring patron saints are practiced in each parish, and Zambaleños are very accommodating when it comes to feasts.

Languages[edit]

Languages Spoken (2000)[6]
LanguageNumber of speakers
Tagalog
  
164,000
Ilokano
  
119,000
Sambal
  
117,000

Sambal, Tagalog, and Ilokano are the three main languages of Zambales. Ilokano has 115,337 native speakers, Sambal has 114,637, and Tagalog has 250,637 (plus 24,995 non-native speakers).[7] 119,126 spoke other languages as their mother tongue, such as Kapampangan, including non-Philippine languages such as English.[7] About 75 percent of the population speaks and understands English to varying degrees of fluency, and road signs are written in that language.

Education[edit]

There are a number of higher educational institutions in the province. The Ramon Magsaysay Technological University, the first state university in the province can be found in Iba. It has also satellite campuses in the municipalities of Sta. Cruz, Candelaria, Masinloc, Botolan, San Marcelino, Castillejos, and in the city of Olongapo. St. Joseph College-Olongapo, a college run by the Roman Catholic Church can be found in Olongapo City. The Columban College, run by the Catholic Church can be found also in Olongapo. The Magsaysay Memorial College is also run by the Roman Catholic Church and can be found in San Narciso.

Economy[edit]

Zambales is a rich source of Nickel & mountain.

Tourist attractions[edit]

Zambales has 173 kilometres (107 mi) of beaches, with coral reefs, dive spots, surfing areas, hotels and day-use beach huts. The province is approximately a 3 to 4 hour drive from Manila, depending on traffic.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Provinces". PSGC Interactive. Makati City, Philippines: National Statistical Coordination Board. Retrieved 13 February 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "Population and Annual Growth Rates for The Philippines and Its Regions, Provinces, and Highly Urbanized Cities". 2010 Census and Housing Population. National Statistics Office. Retrieved 13 February 2013. 
  3. ^ "Municipalities". Zambales Now, Official Website of Zambales. Retrieved on 2012-05.24.
    ** The year of 1542 in the founding of Subic is a misprint and should be the year 1572 like in Botolan as Salcedo was born in 1549.
  4. ^ U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (1955). "Tarlac map". University of Texas in Austin Library. Retrieved on 2012-05-24.
  5. ^ Iba travel guide
  6. ^ ambales: Dependency Ratio Down by Five Persons
  7. ^ a b Zambales

External links[edit]