Yi Shu

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This is a Chinese name; the family name is Ni.
Names
Given namePen name
Trad.倪亦舒亦舒
Simp.倪亦舒亦舒
PinyinNi YishuYi Shu
Cantonese
Romanization
Ngi Yik SueYik Sue

Yi Shu or Isabel Nee Yeh-su (born 1946) is a popular Hong Kong writer.[1] She is the younger sister of Ni Kuang. She has used other pen names, including Rose (玫瑰), Mui Fon (梅峰), Lok Hon (駱絳), and Luk Kok (陸國).

Childhood[edit]

Yi Shu, whose home town is Ningbo, Zhejiang, was born in Shanghai in 1946. She has five brothers and one elder brother. Her pet name was A-mei and her siblings would call her "Xiao Mei Tao". She arrived Hong Kong with her younger brother when she was five. After graduation from Kiangsu and Chekiang Kindergarten and Nursery, Yi Shu studied at Sir Ellis Kadoorie (Sookunpo) Primary School and, subsequently, Ho Tung Technical School For Girls (later known as Hotung Secondary School). She was a rather studious pupil, and got two distinctions and two credits in the HKCEE examination. In 1964, Yu Shi had completed her studies in her secondary school; her schoolmistress gave her a comment: "She was touchy, emotional, and easy to get into a lather…" Consequently, her mother renamed her as Ni Rong (倪容) (容 literally means "to tolerate"), in the hope of Yi Shu could become more calm and generous.

Writing career[edit]

She had been a journalist of "Ming Pao" at the age of 17 after graduation from her secondary school. When she was 27, she went to Manchester to study Hotel Management. She had been the wait staff department supervisor of a hotel in Taiwan (1977), PR manager of the now demolished Furama Hotel in Central, Hong Kong (1978), a top official of the Information Services Department in Hong Kong, as well as a screenwriter. Now, Yi Shu has migrated to Canada, continuing with her writing career. Her novels are mainly romance novels set in modern-day Hong Kong. She is also an essayist as well.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Yi Shu". ChinaCulture. Ministry of Culture of the People's Republic of China. Retrieved 4 January 2011.