X-Statix

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X-Statix
Group publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceX-Force #116 (July 2001)
Created byPeter Milligan
Mike Allred
In-story information
Type of organizationTeam
Agent(s)Anarchist
Bloke
Coach
Dead Girl
Doop
Spike Freeman
El Guapo
Henrietta Hunter
Mysterious Fan Boy
Lacuna
Orphan/Mr. Sensitive
Phat
Saint Anna
Spike
U-Go Girl
Venus Dee Milo
Vivisector
Roster
See: Full roster
X-Statix
Series publication information
ScheduleMonthly
FormatOngoing series
Genre
Publication dateSeptember 2002 – October 2004
Number of issues26
Creator(s)Peter Milligan
Mike Allred
Collected editions
X-Force: Famous, Mutant & MortalISBN 0-7851-1023-2
Good OmensISBN 0-7851-1059-3
Good Guys & Bad GuysISBN 0-7851-1139-5
Back From the DeadISBN 0-7851-1140-9
X-Statix vs. The AvengersISBN 0-7851-1537-4
X-Statix Presents: Dead GirlISBN 0-7851-2031-9
 
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X-Statix
Group publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearanceX-Force #116 (July 2001)
Created byPeter Milligan
Mike Allred
In-story information
Type of organizationTeam
Agent(s)Anarchist
Bloke
Coach
Dead Girl
Doop
Spike Freeman
El Guapo
Henrietta Hunter
Mysterious Fan Boy
Lacuna
Orphan/Mr. Sensitive
Phat
Saint Anna
Spike
U-Go Girl
Venus Dee Milo
Vivisector
Roster
See: Full roster
X-Statix
Series publication information
ScheduleMonthly
FormatOngoing series
Genre
Publication dateSeptember 2002 – October 2004
Number of issues26
Creator(s)Peter Milligan
Mike Allred
Collected editions
X-Force: Famous, Mutant & MortalISBN 0-7851-1023-2
Good OmensISBN 0-7851-1059-3
Good Guys & Bad GuysISBN 0-7851-1139-5
Back From the DeadISBN 0-7851-1140-9
X-Statix vs. The AvengersISBN 0-7851-1537-4
X-Statix Presents: Dead GirlISBN 0-7851-2031-9

X-Statix was a fictional team of mutant superheroes in Marvel Comics, specifically designed to be media superstars. The team, created by Peter Milligan and Mike Allred, first appears in X-Force #116 and originally assumed the moniker X-Force, taking the name of the more traditional superhero team, who appears in #117 claiming to be "the real X-Force."

Publication history[edit]

In 2001, the X-Men family of titles were being revamped by the newly appointed Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Joe Quesada, with the aim to make the titles more critically and commercially successful. Former Vertigo editor Axel Alonso hired writer Peter Milligan, best known for his surreal, post-modernist comics such as Rogan Gosh and Shade, the Changing Man, and Madman artist Mike Allred, as the new creative team for X-Force, starting with issue #116. X-Force prior to Millgan and Allred's first issue sold well[1] but rarely had been the critical success Quesada wanted.[citation needed]

Milligan and Allred completely revamped the series, designing a team more akin to popstars or reality TV contestants than the gritty, violent paramilitary group originally portrayed in the series. The title was laced with Milligan's satirical take on the superhero team as well as general cynicism toward the entire genre. Milligan and Allred would regularly play with killing off the title characters: In their first issue, they wiped out the entire team with only two exceptions. This dramatic revision of the series was not universally accepted. Many readers wanted "their" X-Force back, a complaint Milligan later parodied in the pages of the title.[2] However, the title was receiving mainstream media coverage in titles like Rolling Stone.[citation needed]

X-Force was canceled with issue 129 in 2002 and renamed X-Statix; it restarted with a new issue #1. X-Statix carried on the same themes as X-Force, but with an increasingly satirical tone. Milligan planned to deploy Princess Diana as a character in a story-arc beginning in X-Statix #13: she was slated to return from the dead as a mutant superhero. However, when news of this leaked out to the media, a series of objections followed, most notably from the British tabloid newspaper The Daily Mail.[3][4] Quesada and Marvel announced[citation needed] that they would alter the character, replacing her with a fictional pop star named Henrietta Hunter.

Although sales of the title during this time were moderate, they soon began to decline drastically. After a story-arc that pitted X-Statix against The Avengers, low sales prompted the title's cancellation with issue #26, published in 2004. In the last issue Milligan and Allred killed off the entire team, serving up one last parody of the superhero genre, while tying up the remaining plot threads.

Marvel Comics published X-Statix Presents: Dead Girl in 2006. In the 5 issue mini-series, Dead Girl teams with Doctor Strange to combat a group of villains who have returned from the dead. The series is written by Milligan, with covers by Allred. The storyline (which features the return of The Anarchist, The Orphan, and U-Go-Girl) parodies the manner in which creators in the industry handle death in comic books, with popular characters often brought back from the dead.

Detailed roster[edit]

The team was a group of colorfully dressed and emotionally immature young mutants put together and marketed to be superstars first by the mysterious Coach and later by media mogul Spike Freeman. Some of the members included:

Cover of X-Force #116, by Mike Allred.

Mentors[edit]

Allies[edit]

X-Force[edit]

In Milligan and Allred's first issue of X-Force, nearly the entire team was killed off in an incident called the Boyz 'R Us massacre. This precursory team, of which only U-Go Girl, Doop, and Anarchist survived, also included:

Collected editions[edit]

X-Statix's appearances have been collected into the following trade paperbacks:

The entire run of X-Statix is collected in a hardcover Marvel Omnibus, which collects: X-Force #116-129; Brotherhood #9; X-Statix #1-26; Dead Girl #1-5; Wolverine/Doop #1-2; and material from X-Men Unlimited #41; I ♥ Marvel: My Mutant Heart and Nation X #4. (Marvel, 2011, ISBN 0-7851-5844-8)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ CBGXtra.com - Comics Sales Charts
  2. ^ Lamar, Cyriaque. "5 weird examples of superheroic identity swapping". io9. Retrieved September 15, 2010. 
  3. ^ Milligan, Peter (June 25, 2003). "Princess Diana, superhero". The Guardian. 
  4. ^ Henrietta Hunter (X-Statix leader/charity worker/pop star) at the Appendix to the Handbook of the Marvel Universe, Retrieved September 3, 2009.

References[edit]

External links[edit]