Wyckoff, New Jersey

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Wyckoff, New Jersey
Township
Township of Wyckoff
Map highlighting Wyckoff's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Wyckoff's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wyckoff, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wyckoff, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°59′57″N 74°10′08″W / 40.999093°N 74.168849°W / 40.999093; -74.168849Coordinates: 40°59′57″N 74°10′08″W / 40.999093°N 74.168849°W / 40.999093; -74.168849[1][2]
Country United States of America
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedNovember 2, 1926
Government[5]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorDouglas J. Christie (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • AdministratorRobert J. Shannon, Jr.[4]
 • ClerkJoyce C. Santimauro[4]
Area[2]
 • Total6.607 sq mi (17.113 km2)
 • Land6.547 sq mi (16.957 km2)
 • Water0.060 sq mi (0.156 km2)  0.91%
Area rank247th of 566 in state
6th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[6]331 ft (101 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total16,696
 • Estimate (2013)[10]16,928
 • Rank151st of 566 in state
18th of 70 in county[11]
 • Density2,550.1/sq mi (984.6/km2)
 • Density rank242nd of 566 in state
47th of 70 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07481[12][13]
Area code(s)201[14]
FIPS code3400383050[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0882309[17][2]
Websitewww.wyckoff-nj.com
 
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Wyckoff, New Jersey
Township
Township of Wyckoff
Map highlighting Wyckoff's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Wyckoff's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wyckoff, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wyckoff, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°59′57″N 74°10′08″W / 40.999093°N 74.168849°W / 40.999093; -74.168849Coordinates: 40°59′57″N 74°10′08″W / 40.999093°N 74.168849°W / 40.999093; -74.168849[1][2]
Country United States of America
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedNovember 2, 1926
Government[5]
 • TypeTownship
 • MayorDouglas J. Christie (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • AdministratorRobert J. Shannon, Jr.[4]
 • ClerkJoyce C. Santimauro[4]
Area[2]
 • Total6.607 sq mi (17.113 km2)
 • Land6.547 sq mi (16.957 km2)
 • Water0.060 sq mi (0.156 km2)  0.91%
Area rank247th of 566 in state
6th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[6]331 ft (101 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total16,696
 • Estimate (2013)[10]16,928
 • Rank151st of 566 in state
18th of 70 in county[11]
 • Density2,550.1/sq mi (984.6/km2)
 • Density rank242nd of 566 in state
47th of 70 in county[11]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code07481[12][13]
Area code(s)201[14]
FIPS code3400383050[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID0882309[17][2]
Websitewww.wyckoff-nj.com

Wyckoff is a township in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 16,696,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 188 (+1.1%) from the 16,508 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,136 (+7.4%) from the 15,372 counted in the 1990 Census.[18] As of the 2010 Census, Wyckoff ranked 55th in 100 highest-income places in the United States (with a population of at least 10,000) at $103,614 HHI.[citation needed] Statewide, Wyckoff ranked 41st among New Jersey locations by per capita income, with a per capita money income of $49,375 as of 1999, an increase of 49.1% from the $33,124 recorded in 1989.[19]

From the mid-18th century, what is now Wyckoff was a community within Franklin Township, which consisted of most of northern Bergen County west of the Saddle River. Starting in the 1840s, several new municipalities were created from portions of Franklin Township, so that today what is now Wyckoff borders eight different communities. Wyckoff was formed as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on November 2, 1926, replacing Franklin Township, based on the results of a referendum held that day. Portions of Wyckoff were ceded to Midland Park based on the results of a referendum held on June 9, 1931.[20]

Though there is no solid historical evidence for any of the various theories, the most commonly given origin for the name Wyckoff, which was the origin accepted by the town committee when the town was established, is that the name is from the Lenape word wickoff, meaning "high ground", or that it is from wickok meaning "water".[21][22] However, similarly named Wyckoff Heights in New York City is named after the Wyckoff family, who settled in the New York/New Jersey area when both states were part of the Dutch colony of New Netherlands.[23] Other sources ascribe the name to Wicaugh in Malpas, England.[24]

History[edit]

The first known human inhabitants of the area were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans who lived north of the Raritan River and spoke a Munsee dialect of Algonquian. Sicomac, said to mean "resting place for the departed" or "happy hunting ground", is an area of Wyckoff that, according to tradition, was the burial place of many Native Americans, including Chief Oratam of the Ackingshacys, and many stores and buildings in the community have been named after the area's name, including Sicomac Elementary School.[22] Most Native Americans had left by the 19th century, although a small group lived near Clinton Avenue until 1939.

What is Wyckoff today was originally part of Saddle River Township, which included all of Bergen County west of the Saddle River. Saddle River Township was split in 1771, with the area containing Wyckoff becoming Franklin Township. By 1755, about 100 families lived in the Franklin Township area, of which no more than 20 were in what is now Wyckoff. Franklin Township (1771) consisted of what is today Ho-Ho-Kus (seceded 1849), Ridgewood (seceded 1876), Midland Park (seceded 1894), Oakland (seceded 1902), Franklin Lakes (seceded 1922), and Wyckoff. The size of Franklin Township decreased as areas seceded and were incorporated into their own municipalities. After Franklin Lakes was established in 1922, Franklin Township consisted of only the area known locally as Wyckoff. On November 2, 1926, residents voted (243 positive votes out of 337) to change the name from Franklin Township to the Township of Wyckoff.[20]

The first recorded permanent settlers were John and William Van Voor Haze (Voorhees), who purchased 550 acres (220 ha) of land in the area in 1720. Other early settlers (mostly Dutch) included the Van Horns, Terhunes, Ackermans, Quackenbushes, Pulises, and Vanderhoffs. In 1940 the population was just under 4,000 consisting of roughly 100 families with 30% of the land devoted to farming. By 1969 the number of farms had dropped to 13 covering 3 acres (1.2 ha), 6% of the township. By 2012, only two farms remain: Abma's Farm and Goffle Road Poultry Farm, which is Bergen County's only remaining live market.[25] Rail service by the New Jersey Midland Railway began in 1870. That service was purchased by the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway, which abruptly ended passenger service in 1966.

The Terhune House is an historic home listed on the National Register of Historic Places, located at 161 Godwin Avenue, that was initially constructed in 1737.[26]

In 1994, the Vander Platt funeral home prepared the body of Richard Nixon for burial.

Geography[edit]

Wyckoff is located at 40°59′57″N 74°10′08″W / 40.999093°N 74.168849°W / 40.999093; -74.168849 (40.999093,-74.168849). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 6.607 square miles (17.113 km2), of which, 6.547 square miles (16.957 km2) of it was land and 0.060 square miles (0.156 km2) of it (0.91%) was water.[1][2]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Wyckoff has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
19001,285
19101,50917.4%
19201,288−14.6%
19303,001*133.0%
19403,847*28.2%
19505,59045.3%
196011,205100.4%
197016,03943.1%
198015,500−3.4%
199015,372−0.8%
200016,5087.4%
201016,6961.1%
Est. 201316,928[10]1.4%
Population sources:
1910–1930[28] 1900–2010[29][30][31]
2000[32][33] 2010[7][8][9]
* Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 16,696 people, 5,646 households, and 4,641 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,550.1 per square mile (984.6 /km2). There were 5,827 housing units at an average density of 890.0 per square mile (343.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.53% (15,616) White, 0.56% (94) Black or African American, 0.04% (7) Native American, 4.23% (706) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.47% (79) from other races, and 1.16% (194) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 4.41% (737) of the population.[7]

There were 5,646 households, of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.2% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.8% were non-families. 16.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.26.[7]

In the township, 27.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 17.9% from 25 to 44, 32.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.3 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $145,366 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,501) and the median family income was $163,034 (+/- $10,963). Males had a median income of $111,950 (+/- $12,210) versus $64,148 (+/- $10,102) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $64,476 (+/- $5,019). About 0.6% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.9% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.[34]

Same-sex couples headed 24 households in 2010, an increase from the 17 counted in 2000.[35]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 16,508 people, 5,541 households, and 4,632 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,521.6 people per square mile (973.1/km2). There were 5,638 housing units at an average density of 861.2 per square mile (332.3/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.54% White, 0.47% African American, 0.15% Native American, 3.70% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.45% from other races, and 0.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.28% of the population.[32][33]

There were 5,541 households out of which 42.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.7% were married couples living together, 5.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.4% were non-families. 14.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.22.[32][33]

In the township the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 26.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.[32][33]

In 2010, the median income for a household in the township was $138,373, and the median income for a family was $154,420. In 2000, males had a median income of $87,850 versus $51,929 for females. The per capita income for the township was $49,375. About 1.1% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.3% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.[32][33]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Wyckoff is governed under the Township form of municipal government by a Township Committee, which consists of five members elected at-large for staggered three-year terms, with either one or two committee members chosen each year on a partisan basis during the November general election in a three-year cycle. At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects a chairperson from among its members who serves as Mayor, and another member to serve as Deputy Mayor. The Committee serves as Wyckoff's legislative and executive body, with the Mayor responsible for chairing meetings and signing documents on behalf of the Township.[5]

As of 2014, the members of the Wyckoff Township Committee are Mayor Douglas J. Christie (R, 2014), Rudolf E. Boonstra (R, 2016), Haakon C. Jepsen (R, 2015), Kevin J. Rooney (R, 2015) and Brian D. Scanlan (D, 2014).[3][36][37][38][39][40]

Committee member Kevin Rooney won the 2013 version of the Food Network series Chopped, donating his $10,000 winnings to Oasis – A Haven for Women and Children based in Paterson.[41]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Wyckoff is located in the 5th Congressional District[42] and is part of New Jersey's 40th state legislative district.[8][43][44]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[45] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[46][47] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[48][49]

The 40th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Kevin J. O'Toole (R, Cedar Grove) and in the General Assembly by Scott Rumana (R, Wayne) and David C. Russo (R, Ridgewood).[50] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[51] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[52]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[53] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[54] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[55] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[56] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[57] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[58] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[59] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[60] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[61] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[62][63] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[64] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[65] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[66][67][53]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 11,809 registered voters in Wyckoff Township, of which 2,203 (18.7% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 4,504 (38.1% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 5,099 (43.2% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[68] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 70.7% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 97.7% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[68][69]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 5,871 votes here (64.0% vs. 43.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 3,183 votes (34.7% vs. 54.8%) and other candidates with 68 votes (0.7% vs. 0.9%), among the 9,168 ballots cast by the township's 12,430 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.8% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[70][71] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 5,851 votes here (59.3% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 3,903 votes (39.6% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 55 votes (0.6% vs. 0.8%), among the 9,860 ballots cast by the township's 12,085 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.6% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[72][73] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 5,990 votes here (62.8% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 3,459 votes (36.3% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 63 votes (0.7% vs. 0.7%), among the 9,541 ballots cast by the township's 11,624 registered voters, for a turnout of 82.1% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[74]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,905 votes here (50.3% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,608 votes (42.4% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 213 votes (5.6% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 24 votes (0.6% vs. 0.5%), among the 3,791 ballots cast by the township's 6,975 registered voters, yielding a 54.4% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[75]

Education[edit]

The Wyckoff School District serves public students in Kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's five schools had an enrollment of 2,257 students and 176.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.82:1.[76] The schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[77]) are four elementary schools — Coolidge Elementary School[78] (grades K-5; 329 students), Lincoln Elementary School[79] (K-5; 355), Sicomac Elementary School[80] (PreK-5; 330) and Washington Elementary School[81] (K-5; 418) — and Eisenhower Middle School[82] (6-8; 855).[83][84]

Calvin Coolidge School, located at 420 Grandview Avenue, is an elementary school which opened in 1932 as a six-room K-6 school and has been expanded several times over the years. Eisenhower Middle School was approved in 1960 and dedicated 1963. Since 1993, Eisenhower has served grades 6 to 8. Abraham Lincoln School was dedicated in 1953 on land purchased in 1950. Sicomac School was completed in 1967. George Washington School was constructed as an 11-room brick building on the site where the previous school had burned down.

In the 2003-04 school year, Eisenhower Middle School was recognized with the Blue Ribbon Award from the United States Department of Education, the highest honor that an American school can achieve.[85]

Public high school students from Wyckoff in ninth through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District, which also serves students from Franklin Lakes and Oakland.[86] Students entering the district as freshmen have the option to attend either of the district's high schools, subject to a choice made during eighth grade.[87][88] Franklin Lakes, Oakland and Wyckoff (FLOW district) approved the creation of a regional high school in 1954 by a vote of 1,060 to 51, with Ramapo High School (in Franklin Lakes) opened in 1957 and Indian Hills High School in 1960.[citation needed] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[89]) are Indian Hills High School, located in Oakland[90] (1,181 students) and Ramapo High School, located in Franklin Lakes[91] (1,145 students).[92]

The first public school building in the township was a one-room schoolhouse constructed on Wyckoff Avenue in 1869 and used until 1906. Prior to 1929, high school students attended Central High School in Paterson, before the Board of Education voted to send students to Ramsey High School in Ramsey instead.[93]

Public school students from the township, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[94][95]

Eastern Christian Middle School (ECMS) is a private Christian school with about 200 students in grades 6-8 that is a part of the Eastern Christian School Association.[96]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The township had a total of 92.04 miles (148.12 km) of roadways, of which 77.02 miles (123.95 km) are maintained by the municipality, 12.60 miles (20.28 km) by Bergen County and 2.42 miles (3.89 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[97]

Route 208 heads northwest through the township, entering from Hawthorne in Passaic County and continuing for 2.5 miles (4.0 km) into Franklin Lakes.[98] County Route 502 (Franklin Avenue) enters from Franklin Lakes and runs east-west through the northern portion of the township for 2.0 miles (3.2 km) into Waldwick.[99]

Public transportation[edit]

The former station at Wyckoff for the New York, Susquehanna and Western Railway is visible to the left along with the lone active track and a rusted, unused siding

New Jersey Transit provides local bus service on the 752 route, which operates between Oakland and Hackensack.[100]

Bus service is also provided by Short Line Bus to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, with some buses providing service across 42nd Street to Second Avenue.[101]

Local media[edit]

Wyckoff is served by the Wyckoff Suburban News, a weekly community newspaper published by the North Jersey Media Group. The daily newspaper for the region is The Record which is also published by North Jersey Media Group.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Wyckoff include: ((B) denotes that the person was born there).

Historic sites[edit]

The Van Voorhees-Quackenbush House was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.

Wyckoff is home to the following locations on the National Register of Historic Places:[140]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Township of Wyckoff. Accessed July 3, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Phone Directory, Township of Wyckoff. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2006, p. 169.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Wyckoff, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Wyckoff township, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 7, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011–2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 16. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Wyckoff township, Bergen County, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed May 7, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 15, 2011.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Wyckoff, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 7, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  19. ^ Money Income (1989 and 1999) and Poverty (1999) New Jersey, Counties and Municipalities, New Jersey State Data Center, April 2003. Accessed November 5, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606–1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 80. Accessed June 7, 2012.
  21. ^ A Brief History, Township of Wyckoff. Accessed August 10, 2011. "There is reason to believe that the name Wyckoff is a derivation of the Indian word "wickoff" meaning high ground or "wickok" meaning water."
  22. ^ a b Cheslow, Jerry. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Wyckoff; Country Ambiance in Ramapo Foothills". The New York Times, March 19, 1995. Accessed May 7, 2012. "Wyckoff, which means 'water' in the Leni Lenape Indian language, is built around a dozen ponds connected by brooks and streams. The Minisink Indian Trail from the Delaware River to the Atlantic Ocean passed through what is now Wyckoff, in a neighborhood that is still called Sicomac, meaning 'Happy Hunting Ground.'"
  23. ^ http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/B52ED0B1-7AD1-4BA2-AB6B-71EB91C960E8/54279/ProclamationLetter1.pdf
  24. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey State Library, May 1945. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  25. ^ Staff. "The good egg: tasty and versatile, it's at the heart of many a recipe", The Record (Bergen County), February 17, 2010. Accessed May 7, 2012. "For the freshest eggs locally, look to such farms as Goffle Road Poultry Farm or Abma’s Farm, both in Wyckoff, where the eggs are collected from their own chickens..."
  26. ^ NEW JERSEY - Bergen County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed February 20, 2008.
  27. ^ Climate Summary for Wyckoff, New Jersey
  28. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed November 13, 2013. Source lists population of 1,954 in 1910 and 1,671 in 1920, which is the population for Franklin Township.
  29. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930–1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed May 7, 2012.
  30. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  31. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County, Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed November 13, 2013. Data for years prior to the township's establishment were extrapolated by county analysts.
  32. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Wyckoff township, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 20, 2013.
  33. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Wyckoff township, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 20, 2013.
  34. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Wyckoff township, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 7, 2012.
  35. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 3, 2013. Accessed August 19, 2014.
  36. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Township of Wyckoff. Accessed August 19, 2014.
  37. ^ Bergen County Directory 2013-2014, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed August 19, 2014.
  38. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote - General Election 2012 - November 6, 2012, Bergen County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  39. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote - General Election 2011 - November 8, 2011, Bergen County, New Jersey Clerk, run date November 17, 2011. Accessed March 8, 2013.
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  41. ^ Herzog, Laura. "Serving Up Assistance: Chopped winner Kevin Rooney of Wyckoff helps nonprofits", (201) magazine, December 27, 2013. Accessed August 19, 2014. "Self-taught home cook and Wyckoff committeeman Kevin Rooney took his kitchen skills all the way to the top on Food Network's cooking competition show Chopped, which he won in 2013.... The former mayor donated the Chopped prize money to the Paterson nonprofit Oasis – A Haven for Women and Children."
  42. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 66, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Districts by Number for 2011–2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  48. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  57. ^ Joan M. Voss, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  58. ^ John A. Felice, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  59. ^ Maura R. DeNicola, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  60. ^ Steve Tanelli, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  61. ^ James, J. Tedesco, III, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  62. ^ Tracy Silna Zur, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  63. ^ Freeholder Board, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  64. ^ About the Clerk, Bergen County Clerk. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  65. ^ About Sheriff Michael Saudino, Bergen County Sheriff's Office. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  66. ^ Michael R. Dressler, Bergen County Surrogate's Court. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  67. ^ Constitutional Officers, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 15, 2014.
  68. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Bergen, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  69. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  70. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  71. ^ Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  72. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  73. ^ 2008 General Election Results for Wyckoff, The Record (Bergen County). Accessed August 10, 2011.
  74. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  75. ^ 2009 Governor: Bergen County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  76. ^ District information for Wyckoff School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 19, 2014.
  77. ^ School Data for the Wyckoff School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed August 19, 2014.
  78. ^ Coolidge Elementary School, Wyckoff Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  79. ^ Lincoln Elementary School, Wyckoff Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  80. ^ Sicomac Elementary School, Wyckoff Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  81. ^ Washington Elementary School, Wyckoff Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  82. ^ Eisenhower Middle School, Wyckoff Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  83. ^ Schools, Wyckoff Public Schools. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  84. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Wyckoff Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 24, 2013.
  85. ^ 2003 No Child Left Behind – Blue Ribbon Schools, United States Department of Education. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  86. ^ Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 3, 2014. "The Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District serves students from Franklin Lakes, Oakland, and Wyckoff in a comprehensive two-campus setting. Students from the three communities may choose which of the two high schools they wish to attend for their four-year high school experience."
  87. ^ Van Dusen, Matthew. "Ramapo-Indian Hills schools chief to retire.", The Record (Bergen County), October 24, 2007. Accessed December 24, 2013. "Later, parents of Oakland students protested their lack of choice, and students in Wyckoff, Franklin Lakes and Oakland can now attend either school."
  88. ^ Eighth Grade School Choice, Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District. Accessed December 24, 2013. "All eighth grade students from Franklin Lakes, Oakland, and Wyckoff may choose to attend the high school of their choice...."
  89. ^ School Data for the Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  90. ^ Indian Hills High School, Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  91. ^ Ramapo High School, Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  92. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Ramapo Indian Hills Regional High School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  93. ^ Staff. "ENROLLMENTS TAX SCHOOLS IN BERGEN; Auxiliary Rooms Are Being Converted for Classes and Construction Is Pushed", The New York Times, September 4, 1954. Accessed December 24, 2013. "How soon this plant will be ready is problematical, but there is pressure in the fact that Wyckoff and Franklin Lakes students will not be accepted at Ramsey High School after the fall of 1956."
  94. ^ About Us, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  95. ^ Admissions, Bergen County Technical Schools. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  96. ^ Middle School, Eastern Christian School Association. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  97. ^ Bergen County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  98. ^ Route 208 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2006. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  99. ^ County Route 502 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2006. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  100. ^ Routes by County: Bergen County, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed August 10, 2011.
  101. ^ Schedule Details from Wyckoff, NJ to New York, NY, Short Line (bus company). Accessed December 24, 2013.
  102. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "Comic Actress Makes a Lot Out of Little Parts", The Record (Bergen County), August 21, 2001. Accessed December 24, 2013. "Nowadays, she lives in Los Angeles, and on TV she calls Hartford home. But on this summer morning, Jillian Armenante is in Wyckoff, her real hometown, sipping a grande coffee at Starbucks."
  103. ^ Obit: Dr. Theodore J. Bauer, Ancestry.com, November 14, 2005. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Dr. Theodore J. Bauer, 95, of Wyckoff on May 6, 2005 at home."
  104. ^ Staff. "Theodore J. Bauer", The Washington Post, May 15, 2005. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Theodore J. Bauer, 95, a former head of the Centers for Disease Control and assistant surgeon general and an expert on venereal disease, died May 6 of congestive heart failure at his home in Wyckoff, NJ."
  105. ^ Daly, Mike. "Keeping the Critics Jazzed", (201) magazine, July 2008.
  106. ^ Staff. "'Rock' & a Good Place ; Wyckoff's Katrina Bowden Gains Rich Experience On Nbc's Surging Sitcom", The Record (Bergen County), December 28, 2006. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Katrina Bowden was all set to move from her family's Wyckoff home into a college apartment in New York City when she found out in late August that she'd landed the role of Cerie, the reluctant receptionist on the NBC comedy 30 Rock."
  107. ^ Wassel, Bryan. "Wyckoff native talks up prehistoric adventure", Wyckoff Suburban News, March 16, 2013. Accessed November 13, 2013. "On March 9, Kirk DeMicco returned to where it all began.... The Wyckoff native and former Franklin Lakes resident said his passion for movies was born at a screening of Star Wars in the now-demolished movie theater on Route 4 that the AMC has replaced."
  108. ^ McGinley, Devin. "Wyckoff Native Driving Profits in Hollywood; Wyckoff native Kirk DeMicco's "The Croods" is reportedly responsible for a surge in profits at DreamWorks Animation.", WyckoffPatch, August 1, 2013. Accessed November 13, 2013. "DeMicco, a former Wyckoff resident who attended Sicomac Elementary, Eisenhower Middle School and Ramapo High School, returned to Bergen County in 2012 for a prerelease screening of the film for friends and family."
  109. ^ a b Vaccaro, Mike. Emperors and Idiots: The Hundred Year Rivalry Between the Yankees and Red Sox, From the Very Beginning to the End of the Curse, p. 4. Random House, 2007. ISBN 9780307418951. Accessed December 24, 2013. "By 1983, Dent had been traded away to the Texas Rangers, though he still owned a house in Wyckoff, New Jersey, which he rented out during the season. That year, the lease belonged to the man who’d recently been hired as the Yankees’ third-base coach, a baseball lifer named Don Zimmer, the same man who’d been the Red Sox manager on October 2, 1978, and whose professional fate was irreversibly sealed with that one swing of Dent’s bat."
  110. ^ Spelling, Ian. "Putting Down Roots: Fox & Friends co-anchor Steve Doocy is right at home in Bergen", (201) magazine, February 1, 2010. Accessed September 20, 2011. "Steve Doocy was born in Iowa, raised in Kansas, works in Manhattan, and lives in Wyckoff with his wife, Kathy, and their three children, Peter, Mary and Sally."
  111. ^ Gertrude Ederle, first woman to swim English Channel; at 98, The Boston Globe, December 1, 2003. "She had spent the last several years living at the Christian Health Care Center in Wyckoff, N.J., about 25 miles (40 km) northwest of New York City."
  112. ^ a b Gleick, Elizabeth. "THREE KIDS, ONE DEATH", Time (Magazine), December 2, 1996. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  113. ^ Prunty, Brendan. "Barclays 2013: Wyckoff's Morgan Hoffmann makes stellar PGA Tour debut in front of home crowd", The Star-Ledger, August 22, 2013. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Morgan Hoffmann completed his first round in his home state as a PGA Tour pro in sterling fashion. The Wyckoff native is in a seven-way tie for seventh place, after shooting a 4-under 67."
  114. ^ Idec, keith. "Buffalo Bills give Wyckoff's Chris Hogan a shot", The Record (Bergen County), September 7, 2013. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Chris Hogan slept for about an hour last Friday night.... The Wyckoff resident was out of football for two-plus months, until Buffalo signed him to its practice squad Nov. 6."
  115. ^ "The JONAS Brothers talk purity rings & their Irish roots" YouTube; May 19, 2009; Accessed July 17, 2010
  116. ^ Reily, Sean Patrick. "The Jonas Brothers: It's full scream ahead" The Los Angeles Times; February 26, 2009
  117. ^ Chebatoris, Jac. "The Boy Band Next Door", Newsweek, January 26, 2008. Accessed December 24, 2013. "The boys are from Wyckoff, N.J., but they now call L.A. home—when they're there, which Joe says means 'four days since last May.'"
  118. ^ a b c Second Cup Café: The Jonas Brothers, CBS News, September 2, 2006. Accessed December 24, 2013. "The brothers from Wyckoff, N.J., visit the Second Cup Café to play songs from their album."
  119. ^ West, Kelly. "Dan Karaty", Television Blend, July 27, 2009. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Dan Karaty, Choreographer – Hometown: Wyckoff, N.J.; Currently Resides In: Los Angeles, Calif."
  120. ^ Staff. "Dan Karaty", The Wyckoff Journal. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Wyckoff native Dan Karaty, well known for his work on So You Think You Can Dance, will be appearing in a new reality TV show on Bravo."
  121. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "Professional juggler", The Record (Bergen County), November 13, 2005. Accessed December 24, 2013. "'I'm sort of half in one world, half in the other at this point of the day,' says MacCallum, a Wyckoff native who has lived in Ridgewood since her elder son was 2 weeks old."
  122. ^ "Wyckoff native Constantine Maroulis moves beyond 'Idol' fame", The Record (Bergen County), February 13, 2007.
  123. ^ Hernandez, Ernio. "PLAYBILL.COM'S CUE & A: Constantine Maroulis", Playbill (magazine), October 21, 2008. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Hometown: Born in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Raised in Wyckoff, NJ"
  124. ^ Parisi, Albert J. "Parole-Curb Bill Gaining Support", The New York Times, March 6, 1988. Accessed November 13, 2013. "According to its primary sponsor in the Senate, Henry P. McNamara, Republican of Wyckoff, the legislation is designed to 'make someone think twice before using a gun on someone entrusted with protecting society, its laws and its property.'"
  125. ^ Sunny Mehta bio, Sunnymehta.com. Accessed June 8, 2007.
  126. ^ Dupont, Kevin. "RANGERS WAITING FOR COACH AND DRAFTEE", The New York Times, June 17, 1985. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Max Middendorf of Wyckoff, N.J., was Quebec's third-round choice, 57th over all."
  127. ^ Juliano, Joe. "Milanese is happy, all-Ivy or not The top receiver in Penn football history is very satisfied with his college career.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, November 22, 2002. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Milanese, of Wyckoff, N.J., has played a major role in Penn's domination of the Ivy League this season."
  128. ^ Beckerman, Jim; and Rohan, Virginia. "Our picks for Oscar's top honors", The Record (Bergen County), January 25, 2012. Accessed June 7, 2012. "And what happened to Tilda Swinton, Leonardo DiCaprio and Wyckoff's Ezra Miller (a Best Supporting Actor possibility for We Need to Talk About Kevin)?"
  129. ^ Staff. "John Mooney, Co-inventor of the Catalytic Converter, to Receive Distinguished Alumni Achievement Medal from New Jersey Institute of Technology", New Jersey Institute of Technology press release, September 29, 2004. Accessed November 13, 2013. "We can all breathe a lot easier thanks to John Mooney, of Wyckoff, who was awarded the National Medal of Technology in 2002 for pioneering the automotive catalytic converter."
  130. ^ Cogan, Brian (2008). The Encyclopedia of Punk. Sterling. ISBN 1-4027-5960-6. 
  131. ^ Wolff, Craig. "Part visionary, part politician: Rutgers' Tim Pernetti could be prototype for the modern AD", The Star-Ledger, January 6, 2013. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Season to season, their backyard on Birchwood Drive in Wyckoff was a football field, or Fenway park."
  132. ^ John Rathbone Ramsey, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed July 28, 2007.
  133. ^ Petrick, John. "LOCAL GIRL GOES WILD!", The Record (Bergen County), August 8, 2005. Accessed June 5, 2007. "'You're going to know who the real Tara Reid is. Not what the newspapers and the press say,' says the Wyckoff native, international movie star, girlfriend to some of the greats and, most recently, victim of a mortifying red carpet wardrobe malfunction."
  134. ^ Jenkins, Lee. "COLLEGE FOOTBALL; Schiano Dreamed Where Others Had Night Terrors", The New York Times, November 9, 2006. Accessed November 13, 2013. " Big-time college football is finally being reintroduced to the New York metropolitan area -- or, as Schiano likes to call it, the State of Rutgers. Growing up in Wyckoff, N.J., Schiano did not know that such a place could exist."
  135. ^ HE'S NICKELODEON'S KIND OF KID -- BUT WYCKOFF TEEN TAKES HIS STARDOM IN STRIDE The Record (Bergen County), April 4, 1998.
  136. ^ Vega, Michael. "ALL THE WOOING RESULTED IN WOE FOR RUTGERS, TOAL IS ONE WHO GOT AWAY", The Boston Globe, November 7, 2004. Accessed December 24, 2013. "Rutgers officials gave Toal the red-carpet treatment, squiring him to a men's basketball game against Notre Dame last Jan. 31 at the Louis Brown Athletic Center, where the capacity crowd, many attired in No. 1 Rutgers jerseys with Toal's name on the back, serenaded the blue-chip recruit from Wyckoff, N.J., with choruses of 'We want Toal! We want Toal! We want Toal!'"
  137. ^ Alfred Bernard Vandeweghe obituary. dignitymemorial.com. Retrieved on March 24, 2014.
  138. ^ Rohan, Virginia. "British voice of American business", The Record (Bergen County), May 12, 2010. Accessed November 13, 2013. "Now, here he is all these years later, with his own show, Varney & Company on Fox Business Network, and a lovely house in Franklin Lakes, where he has lived for the past 16 years. Before that, he lived for 13 years in Wyckoff."
  139. ^ Loffredo, Nicholas. "Yudin Named to State Transition Committee", WyckoffPatch, December 2, 2009. Accessed December 19, 2013. "A Belleville native, Yudin has lived in Wyckoff since 1970, and the business started in 1935 in Paterson came to the township in 1972."
  140. ^ New Jersey - Bergen County, National Register of Historic Places. Accessed November 15, 2011.
  141. ^ Cairns-Whiten-Blauvelt-Dambach House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  142. ^ Cruse-Hossington House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  143. ^ Folley-Bush House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  144. ^ Masker House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  145. ^ John C. Stagg House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  146. ^ Terhune House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  147. ^ Van Blarcom-Jardine House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  148. ^ Albert Van Blarcom House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  149. ^ Van Horn-Ackerman House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  150. ^ Van Houten-Ackerman House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed December 24, 2013.
  151. ^ Van Voorhees-Quackenbush-Zabriskie House, Wyckoff Historical Society. Accessed November 13, 2013.
  152. ^ Zabriskie House, Township of Wyckoff. Accessed November 13, 2013.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]