Wiscon

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WisCon
GenreFeminist science fiction
LocationMadison, Wisconsin
CountryUnited States
First held1975
Official websitehttp://www.wiscon.info/
 
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WisCon
GenreFeminist science fiction
LocationMadison, Wisconsin
CountryUnited States
First held1975
Official websitehttp://www.wiscon.info/

Wiscon or WisCon, a Wisconsin Science Fiction Convention, is often called the world's leading feminist science fiction convention and conference. It was first held in Madison, Wisconsin in February 1977,.[1] The convention is now held annually in May, during the four-day weekend of Memorial Day. Sponsored by the Society for the Furtherance and Study of Fantasy and Science Fiction or (SF)³, WisCon gathers together women and men: fans, writers, editors, publishers, scholars and artists from around the world to discuss science fiction and fantasy, with emphasis on issues of feminism, gender, race, and class. Writers' workshops are held on the Friday morning of the convention.

WisCon Guests of Honor have included Eleanor Arnason, Iain M. Banks, Lois McMaster Bujold, Emma Bull, Pat Cadigan, Avedon Carol, Terry Carr, Suzy McKee Charnas, Buck & Juanita Coulson, Samuel R. Delany, Charles de Lint, Beverly DeWeese, Gardner Dozois, L. Timmel Duchamp, Suzette Haden Elgin, Carol Emshwiller, Karen Joy Fowler, Jeanne Gomoll, Nicola Griffith, Andrea Hairston, Barbara Hambly, David Hartwell, Nina Kiriki Hoffman, Nalo Hopkinson, Ellen Klages, Nancy Kress, Ursula K. Le Guin, Elizabeth A. Lynn, R. A. MacAvoy, Katherine MacLean, George R. R. Martin, Maureen McHugh, Vonda N. McIntyre, Patricia A. McKillip, Judith Merril, China Miéville, Pat Murphy, Debbie Notkin, Trina Robbins, Mary Doria Russell, Geoff Ryman, Jessica Amanda Salmonson, Pamela Sargent, Melissa Scott, Nisi Shawl, Stu Shiffman, Sheri S. Tepper, John Varley, Joan D. Vinge, Elisabeth Vonarburg, Howard Waldrop, Connie Willis, Terri Windling, Don & Elsie Wollheim, Susan Wood, and Chelsea Quinn Yarbro.

The James Tiptree, Jr. Award, an annual literary prize for science fiction or fantasy that expands or explores our understanding of gender, originated in a discussion at a prior WisCon, and the Tiptree Ceremony is often held at WisCon. Broad Universe, an organization with the primary goal of promoting science fiction, fantasy, and horror written by women, also originated in a discussion at a prior WisCon; as did the Carl Brandon Society, which is dedicated to addressing the representation of people of color in science fiction, fantasy and horror.

WisCon 30 (May 26–29, 2006) was an anniversary Wiscon, and many previous Guests of Honor attended.

Contents

Books about WisCon

In 2007, Aqueduct Press began issuing a series of books titled "WisCon Chronicles", with The WisCon Chronicles: Vol. 1 ISBN 978-1-933500-14-0, edited by L. Timmel Duchamp.[2] Volume 2 was The WisCon Chronicles: Volume 2: Provocative essays on feminism, race, revolution, and the future ISBN 978-1-933500-20-1, edited by Duchamp and Eileen Gunn;[3] followed by The WisCon Chronicles: Vol. 3: The Carnival of Feminist SF ISBN 978-1-933500-30-0, edited by Liz Henry;[4] The WisCon Chronicles: Vol. 4: Voices of WisCon ISBN 978-1-933500-40-9 edited by Sylvia Kelso;[5] and The WisCon Chronicles: Volume 5: Writing and Racial Identity ISBN 978-1-933500-73-7, edited by Nisi Shawl and released at WisCon 35 (May 27–30, 2011), where Shawl was Guest of Honor.[6] Volume 5, like Volume 4 before it, was supported by a grant from the Society for the Furtherance & Study of Fantasy & Science Fiction [(SF)3].

Helen Merrick's 2009 The Secret Feminist Cabal ISBN 978-1-933500-33-1, a 2010 Hugo nominee, while a broader history of the topic, contains a number of mentions and descriptions of WisCon itself and of various WisCon-spawned projects such as the Tiptree Awards, Broad Universe and the Carl Brandon Society, beginning with the author's preface and continuing throughout the book.[7]

WisCholera

In 2008, many WisCon 33 members caught an illness that became known as "WisCholera". Subsequent analysis revealed that this was not actually cholera but rather a gastrointestinal illness caused by norovirus, a highly infectious virus that can be transmitted by close contact, or via contaminated food, water, or objects. Victims typically recover from norovirus without needing medical intervention. The particular strain of norovirus that occurred at WisCon has been designated "AY502008 (Wiscon)".[8]

Sources

References

  1. ^ "About WisCon: History of WisCon". WisCon. http://www.wiscon.info/about.php. 
  2. ^ The WisCon Chronicles: Vol. 1 on Aqueduct Press website
  3. ^ Volume 2
  4. ^ Volume 3
  5. ^ Volume 4
  6. ^ Volume 5
  7. ^ Merrick, Helen. The Secret Feminist Cabal: A Cultural History of Science Fiction Feminisms Seattle: Aqueduct Press, 2009; pp. v-vi, et seq.]
  8. ^ Ming, Tan; Ming Xia, Yutao Chen, Weiming Bu, Rashmi S. Hegde, Jarek Meller, Xuemei Li, and Xi Jiang (2009-04-01). "Conservation of Carbohydrate Binding Interfaces — Evidence of Human HBGA Selection in Norovirus Evolution". PLoS ONE 4. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0005058. http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0005058. Retrieved 2010-12-06. 

External links