Winston Marshall

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Winston Marshall
Winston Marshall of Mumford & Sons with a fan in Pelham, Alabama in September 9, 2013.jpg
Winston Marshall of Mumford & Sons with a fan in Pelham, Alabama in September 9, 2013.
Background information
Birth nameWinston Aubrey Aladar Marshall
Born(1988-12-07) 7 December 1988 (age 25)
OriginFullham, London, England, United Kingdom
GenresFolk rock, indie folk
OccupationsMusician, songwriter
InstrumentsVocals, banjo, bass guitar, guitar, dobro
Years active2007–present
LabelsIsland Records (UK), Universal Music Group (Canada & AUS) and Glassnote Records (US)
 
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Winston Marshall
Winston Marshall of Mumford & Sons with a fan in Pelham, Alabama in September 9, 2013.jpg
Winston Marshall of Mumford & Sons with a fan in Pelham, Alabama in September 9, 2013.
Background information
Birth nameWinston Aubrey Aladar Marshall
Born(1988-12-07) 7 December 1988 (age 25)
OriginFullham, London, England, United Kingdom
GenresFolk rock, indie folk
OccupationsMusician, songwriter
InstrumentsVocals, banjo, bass guitar, guitar, dobro
Years active2007–present
LabelsIsland Records (UK), Universal Music Group (Canada & AUS) and Glassnote Records (US)

Winston Aubrey Aladar Marshall (born 7 December 1988) is a British musician, best known as the banjoist in the Grammy Award winning British folk rock band Mumford & Sons.

Early life[edit]

Winston was born on 7 December 1988 to father Paul Marshall, a British investor, philanthropist, and co-founder of the Marshall Wace LLP hedge fund,[1] and mother Sabina, of French descent.[2] Marshall has one sibling, a sister, named Giovanna.

Music career[edit]

Marshall is a founding member of the British folk band Mumford & Sons. He plays the banjo, bass guitar, guitar, dobro, and provides backing vocals. Marshall performed with two of his current band members, Marcus Mumford and Ted Dwane, with Laura Marling before Mumford & Sons.[3]

Before Mumford & Sons became established, Marshall ran a jam night at Bosun's Locker, a tiny music club beneath a pasty shop on the King’s Road in Fulham,[4] where a number of musicians who had an affinity for earthy acoustic music hung out and played with each other in fluid lineups.[5]

Marshall was in a band prior to Mumford & Sons called Captain Kick and the Cowboy Ramblers,[6] a bluegrass sleaze rap band,[7] where he was credited as Country Winston and played the banjo.

In October 2013, Marshall joined a temporary supergroup named Salvador Dali Parton with fellow musicians Gill Landry of Old Crow Medicine Show, Mike Harris of Apache Relay, Jake Orrall of JEFF the Brotherhood, and Justin Hayward-Young of the Vaccines. The band, intended as a joke from the start, wrote six songs in 20-minutes on their first day together, held its one and only full-band rehearsal the next day, and performed six shows around Nashville, Tennessee the following night before breaking up.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Business profile: The Lib Dems' sugar daddy". The Telegraph. The Telegraph. 5 March 2006. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  2. ^ Cohen, David (7 March 2011). "Hedge fund star: My plan to turn round London schools". London Evening Standard. London Evening Standard. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  3. ^ Roberts, Lynn (12 March 2011). "From the archives: FFS interviews Mumford and Sons". For Folk's Sake. For Folk's Sake. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  4. ^ Jones, Alice (21 September 2012). "Mumford and Sons: The English folkies on top of the world". The Independent. The Independent. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  5. ^ Bauer, Patricia (8 October 2013). "Mumford & Sons". Encyclopedia Britannica. Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  6. ^ "Captain Kick and the Cowboy Ramblers". MySpace. MySpace. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  7. ^ Frost, Matt (February 2009). "Mumford & Sons PM's Question Time". Performing Musician. Performing Musician. Retrieved 6 June 2014. 
  8. ^ Gold, Adam (27 October 2013). "Salvador Dali Parton Take Nashville". Rolling Stone. Rolling Stone. Retrieved 6 June 2014.