Wings of Hope (charity)

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Founded in 1962, Wings of Hope is the oldest and largest volunteer, humanitarian aviation based charity in the world. Headquartered in St. Louis, Missouri, USA, it organizes and maintains over 3,000 volunteers in 154 bases in 45 countries. Wings of Hope is strictly humanitarian, meaning it has no religious or political agenda. In fact, it does not accept support from the U.S. government[1] and does not forward funds to any foreign government agencies. The organization focuses strictly on supplying resources to raise the poor to a level of self-sufficiency. The charity was nominated for the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize.

Operations[edit]

Wings of Hope, Inc., operates worldwide in 45 countries. Villages are not required to meet any conditions to receive aid. 90% of all funds generally are directed to its program services.[2] Major portions of its efforts are focused in the following areas:

Medical Air Transport[edit]

The Medical Air Transport System (MAT) is a unique[citation needed] service offered in the United States in 26 states. The MAT locates and arranges for advanced health care, usually for children with massive birth defects and then transports them to and from that care for years until all treatments are completed. The service is provided at no cost and the organization does not accept reimbursement from insurers or the government.

International bases[edit]

Wings of Hope operates over 150 bases in 45 countries. The goal is not simply to provide aid but rather to help communities achieve self-sufficiency [3] and sustainable development. The volunteers come from varied backgrounds and professions, from mechanics to doctors, and together they help the sick, teach, build a community, develop businesses and do everything conceivable to build a region into a level of being able to take care of itself.

Bases are located in North, Central, and South America, Africa, Southeast Asia and Australia.

Since 1962, approximately 18 bases have closed because the organization deemed that the communities had achieved sustainable self-sufficiency.

Notable supporters[edit]

From the Wings of Hope website [3]:

Awards[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1], On the Wings of Hope.
  2. ^ [2], Wings of Hope
  3. ^ Charity Starts at Home, Charity Starts at Home.
  4. ^ PR Leap
  5. ^ Aircare All 2004 Award List
  6. ^ Aircare All 2007 Award List

External links[edit]