Win, Lose or Draw

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Win, Lose or Draw
Win, Lose, or Draw.jpg
GenreGame Show
Directed byRichard S. Kline
Presented byVicki Lawrence
(1987–1989, NBC)
Bert Convy
(1987-1989, Syndication)
Robb Weller
(1989-1990, Syndication)
Narrated byBob Hilton (NBC)
Gene Wood (Syndication)
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes585 (Syndication)
Production
Executive producer(s)Burt Reynolds
Bert Convy
Producer(s)Richard S. Kline
Location(s)CBS Television City
Hollywood, California
Running time22–24 minutes
Production company(s)Burt & Bert Productions
Kline & Friends
DistributorBuena Vista Television
Broadcast
Original channelNBC (1987–1989)
Syndication (1987–1990)
Original runSeptember 7, 1987 (1987-09-07) – June 8, 1990 (1990-06-08)
 
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Win, Lose or Draw
Win, Lose, or Draw.jpg
GenreGame Show
Directed byRichard S. Kline
Presented byVicki Lawrence
(1987–1989, NBC)
Bert Convy
(1987-1989, Syndication)
Robb Weller
(1989-1990, Syndication)
Narrated byBob Hilton (NBC)
Gene Wood (Syndication)
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes585 (Syndication)
Production
Executive producer(s)Burt Reynolds
Bert Convy
Producer(s)Richard S. Kline
Location(s)CBS Television City
Hollywood, California
Running time22–24 minutes
Production company(s)Burt & Bert Productions
Kline & Friends
DistributorBuena Vista Television
Broadcast
Original channelNBC (1987–1989)
Syndication (1987–1990)
Original runSeptember 7, 1987 (1987-09-07) – June 8, 1990 (1990-06-08)

Win, Lose or Draw is an American television game show that aired from 1987 to 1990 in syndication and on NBC. It was taped at CBS Television City, often in Studios 31, 33, and 43 at various times.[1] It was co-produced by Burt & Bert Productions (headed by Burt Reynolds and Bert Convy, the original host of the syndicated version) and Kline & Friends for Disney's Buena Vista Television.

The set for "Win, Lose or Draw" was modeled after Burt Reynolds' living room.

Broadcast history[edit]

Both the NBC daytime and nightly syndicated series premiered on September 7, 1987.[2] The NBC edition was hosted by Vicki Lawrence for its entire near-two year run, which ended on September 1, 1989, with Bob Hilton serving as announcer.

Bert Convy, who co-produced both series with Burt Reynolds, hosted the nightly syndicated series from its premiere until the end of its second season in 1989 (also was hosting "Super Password" on NBC until it's cancellation in March 1989). Afterward he moved over to host another game show for his production company, 3rd Degree, and Robb Weller was chosen as his replacement for what turned out to be the final season; the syndicated Win, Lose or Draw aired its final episode on June 8, 1990. Gene Wood was the announcer for this series, with Hilton substituting on occasion.

Reruns of the syndicated version aired on the USA Network from December 31, 1990 to December 24, 1992 and also on Game Show Network from April 15, 2002 to March 14, 2004.

Gameplay[edit]

Two teams, men versus women, each composed of two celebrities and one contestant, took turns guessing a phrase, title or thing that one teammate was drawing on a large pad of paper with markers. The drawer could not speak about the subject in his or her drawing and could not use letters, numbers, or symbols. If one of these illegal clues was used, any money won in that puzzle was split between the two teams. However, if a non-drawing team member mentioned a word that was part of the answer, their teammate at the sketch pad was then allowed to write it down.

In the first three rounds, each team had one minute to solve a puzzle, earning $200 for a correct guess. At the thirty-second mark, a doorbell sounded, and the drawing player had the option of handing the marker off to one of his/her teammates, but the puzzle value would then be cut in half. If the team did not guess within the time limit, the opposing team was given one chance to confer and guess. If they gave the correct answer, they were awarded the money; if not, no money was awarded. The first round was later changed to have the drawing contestant sketch a series of clues to a puzzle, one clue at a time. If the team guessed the puzzle from the identified clues, they scored $200.

Following round three, one player for each team was nominated to draw clues in a 90-second speed round. The topics for drawing were simpler for this round compared to those in previous rounds. Each correct guess was worth $100, and the team could only pass twice. The speed round started with the team that was ahead. The team with the most money at the end of the game won, and the contestant on the winning team received a $1,000 bonus in addition to the money they had already earned. The contestant on the losing team only received the money earned. If both teams were tied at the end of the speed round, each contestant received a $500 bonus.

1989–1990 changes[edit]

For the Robb Weller-hosted third season, the format was changed significantly. The changes coincided with the debut of the Disney Channel teen version that began airing during this season.

The object of the first three rounds was the same, but with some notable differences that were similar to the new teen version.

While teams could no longer switch players at the drawing board, teams could not guess the puzzle until twenty-five seconds had elapsed, which after that point, if the team could guess the puzzle solution within five seconds the civilian player won $200. After that, the puzzle was played for $100. If the team failed to guess the puzzle in the time limit and the opposing team successfully guessed, that team's civilian player won only $50.

The speed round was conducted as it was before, but this time the teams only had sixty seconds instead of ninety to work with and each correct guess was worth $50. The team in the lead at the end of the speed round won the game.

If the game ended in a tie, a tie-breaker was played with the last team to play the speed round going first. The player at the board was given the choice of two words and began drawing, trying to convey the word as fast as he/she could. Once the word was guessed, the opposing team had to guess their word in a faster time. Doing so won the game; if not, the first team won the game.

Bonus round[edit]

Instead of receiving a cash bonus for winning the game as they had in previous seasons, the winning team played a ninety-second bonus game for a chance at $5,000.

The bonus round was played similar to the speed round, except that players were allowed to pass multiple times. The first word was worth $50 and each subsequent word doubled the amount. However, passing cleared all the money from the bank.

If the team correctly guessed seven words within the time limit, regardless of how many times a pass was used, the champion won the $5,000 bonus and returned on the next program. Champions stayed on for ten days or until defeated, whichever came first.

Home versions[edit]

Board game[edit]

Milton Bradley Company created its version in 1987. It could be played like the TV show or a variation of the game with pawns and a gameboard. Party, Junior, and Travel Junior editions were produced, plus a Refill Pack for the game.

Computer and video games[edit]

Hi Tech Expressions released two editions of the DOS version of the game in 1988 plus a Junior Version, followed by a Nintendo version in 1989. Both versions of this party game featured a scene set in a living room, with the game contestants (representing real-life players) seated on opposite couches, much like the television show. While the game system drew a picture on the screen, one of the players would have a limited amount (60 seconds for the main game, and 90 for the speed round) of time to type in the word or phrase represented by the image. If the player typed in the incorrect answer, a player on the opposing team would have an opportunity to type the correct answer (in single-player games, the game system would type a random incorrect answer). The team that typed the correct answer would win money for that round. The team that earned the most money at the end of the game won.

Other versions[edit]

Disney Channel version[edit]

In 1989, The Disney Channel produced a kids' version called Teen Win, Lose or Draw hosted by Marc Price. This series was produced by Burt & Bert Productions in association with Stone Stanley Productions and ran until 1992.

In April 2013, the Disney Channel announced a new version of Win, Lose or Draw, to be hosted by Justin Willman. The two teams on each program will be made up of a Disney star and two other young contestants. New motion-control technology will be featured in the 2014 revival.[3]

Canadian version[edit]

Canadian channel TVA aired a French language version called Fais-moi un dessin (Make me a drawing) hosted by Yves Corbeil from 1988 to 1991.

French version[edit]

French channel Antenne 2 aired their version of WLOD called Dessinez c'est gangé! (Draw is Won!) hosted by Patrice Laffont from 1989 to 1990, they even had a kids version of the show called Dessinez c'est gangé! junior (Draw is Won! junior) hosted by Éric Galliano from 1991 to 1993.

Scotland (Gaelic) version[edit]

A Scottish Gaelic language version aired on STV (not networked BTW) under the name De Tha Seo? (What's This?) with Neen Mackay followed by Cathy Macdonald and lastly, Norm Maclean as hosts from 1990 to 1994.

UK version[edit]

International Versions[edit]

CountryLocal NameHostChannelYear Aired
 Canada (French)Fais-moi un dessinYves CorbeilTVA1988-1991
 FranceDessinez c'est gangé
Dessinez c'est gangé junior
Patrice Laffont
Eric Galliano
Antenne 21989-1990
1993
 Scotland GaelicDe Tha Seo?Neen Mackay
Cathy MacDonald
Norman Maclean
STV1990-1994
 United KingdomWin, Lose or DrawDanny Baker
Shane Richie
Bob Mills
ITV1990-1993
1994
1995-1998
Win, Lose or Draw LateLiza TarbuckApril 14-October 22, 2004

References[edit]

External links[edit]