William Mosley

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William Mosley
Basket Ferentino
PositionCenter
LeagueLegadue Basket
Personal information
Born(1989-06-22) June 22, 1989 (age 24)
Shreveport, Louisiana
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 7 in (201 cm)
Listed weight220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High schoolHuntington (Shreveport, Louisiana)
CollegeNorthwestern State (2008–2012)
NBA draft2012 / Undrafted
Pro playing career2012–present
Career history
2012–2013Biancoblù Basket Bologna (Italy)
2013–presentBasket Ferentino (Italy)
 
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William Mosley
Basket Ferentino
PositionCenter
LeagueLegadue Basket
Personal information
Born(1989-06-22) June 22, 1989 (age 24)
Shreveport, Louisiana
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 7 in (201 cm)
Listed weight220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High schoolHuntington (Shreveport, Louisiana)
CollegeNorthwestern State (2008–2012)
NBA draft2012 / Undrafted
Pro playing career2012–present
Career history
2012–2013Biancoblù Basket Bologna (Italy)
2013–presentBasket Ferentino (Italy)

William Ralph Mosley, Jr. (born June 22, 1989) is an American basketball center for Basket Ferentino in Italy's Legadue Basket. He played for Northwestern State from 2008–09 through 2011–12. He is best known for leading NCAA Division I in blocks as a junior in 2010–11.[1] Mosley recorded a school single season record 156 blocks in 32 games player for an average of 4.9 per game.[1][2] He graduated after 2011–12 as the fifth most prolific shot blocker in NCAA history after having accumulated 456 career blocks.[3]

Early life[edit]

Mosley was born in Shreveport, Louisiana.[4] He attended Huntington High School from 2003–04 to 2006–07, and as a senior he was named Second-team All-District 1-5A on a team that finished with a 34–6 overall record.[4][5] The Raiders, as the team was known, was the second-ranked team in Louisiana's Class 5A.[5] During his final high school season, Mosley averaged 9.2 points, 11.3 rebounds 5.2 blocks per game.[5]

College[edit]

Mosley stayed in his home state to play college basketball, although his collegiate career did not begin until 2008–09.[2][5] That season, he ranked fourth nationally in rebounds per game (8.5) among freshmen and second in blocks per game (2.5).[5] His 76 blocked shots placed him 10th all-time in Northwestern State University history while also ranking him second in single season totals.[2][5]

The following year, his sophomore campaign, Mosley led the Southland Conference with 3.4 blocks per game.[2] He recorded career highs of eight blocks and 21 rebounds en route to being named an Honorable Mention All-Conference selection.[5]

In 2010–11, Mosley increased his statistical averages in most categories, most noticeably in blocks per game.[6] He played in three more games than the year before but also increased his average by 1.5 blocks per game, and Mosley's 4.9 topped NCAA Division I.[1] He had entered his junior year having already amassed 174 career blocks and needing 29 to become the school's all-time leader.[5] After recording 156 during his junior year, and still having one full season left to play, Mosley has entered his senior season in 2011–12 as the school record holder by 127 blocks.[5] When his college career ended following the 2011–12 season he had recorded 456 blocks.[3] This total placed him fifth all-time on the NCAA Division I men's basketball career blocks leaderboard.[3]

Infant twin sons' deaths[edit]

On March 3, 2012, Mosley's two infant twin sons, Jayden and Kayden Mosley, died after spending their entire lives in a hospital due to respiratory issues.[7] The twins were born on March 20, 2011, and there was no apparent threat prior to their deaths.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Statistics - 2010–11". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d "William Mosley stats". ESPN.com. ESPN Internet Ventures. 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "William Mosley, Northwestern State". CBSsports.com. CBS Sports. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "William Mosley". rivals.com. Yahoo!. 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i "William Mosley bio". NSUDemons.com. Northwestern State University. 2010. Retrieved March 24, 2011. 
  6. ^ "William Mosley Statistics". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference, LLC. 2011. Retrieved March 24, 2011. 
  7. ^ a b "Northwestern State mourns loss of William Mosley's 2 sons". shreveporttimes.com. Shreveport Times. March 4, 2012. Retrieved March 25, 2012. 

External links[edit]