Wildlife Aid Foundation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Wildlife Aid Foundation
TypeNon-profit
IndustryAnimal Rescue and Rehabilitation of Wildlife.
Founded1980
HeadquartersLeatherhead, Surrey, England, United Kingdom
Key peopleSimon Cowell MBE (Founder, and current Director/Chairman)
Employees5 staff plus 230 volunteers
Websitewww.wildlifeaid.org.uk
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Wildlife Aid Foundation
TypeNon-profit
IndustryAnimal Rescue and Rehabilitation of Wildlife.
Founded1980
HeadquartersLeatherhead, Surrey, England, United Kingdom
Key peopleSimon Cowell MBE (Founder, and current Director/Chairman)
Employees5 staff plus 230 volunteers
Websitewww.wildlifeaid.org.uk

The Wildlife Aid Foundation is a charity dedicated to the rescue, care and rehabilitation of sick, injured and orphaned animals. Based in Leatherhead, Surrey, UK, the centre operates Surrey County's only wildlife hospital[1] (one of the three largest such hospitals in the UK)[2] and maintains a referral service for wildlife hospitals throughout Europe.[3] The organisation also carries out environmental activist[3] and educational roles.[1][4] Wildlife Aid has attracted media attention for its rescues of photogenic wild animals like young foxes[5] and baby badgers;[6] Animal Planet's TV program Wildlife SOS chronicles the activities of Wildlife Aid volunteers as they rescue imperiled animals.

Wildlife hospital[edit]

Wildlife Aid got its start in 1979 when its founder, Simon Cowell MBE, acquired a farmhouse in Leatherhead with the intent of running a local wildlife rescue facility.[7] Formally established a year later, the centre's activities steadily increased in scale; the hospital now treats more than 20,000 wild animals a year,[7] returning 70% of them to the wild.[2] It has saved the lives of more than 150,000 animals since the charity's formation in 1980. The organisation currently operates on a budget of £350,000 per year,[7] and relies on over 200 volunteers to provide an all-year-round service.[2] Its facilities include two operating theatres, a pathology lab, and an intensive care unit.[7] A campaign is currently planned to build a larger complex on a new site that will allow the expansion of the organisation's educational programmes; the planned expansion would increase the facility's footprint to 10 acres (40,000 m2), rely heavily on eco-friendly technology, and be carbon-neutral.[1]

As of 11 November 2011, "Wildlife Aid" was reincorporated at the Charity Commission as the "Wildlife Aid Foundation"

Wildlife SOS[edit]

Main article: Wildlife SOS

In 1996, following a fire that destroyed one third of the hospital complex, Cowell found his organisation reliant on media attention for its continued survival.[7] Cowell was approached by representatives of the newly formed Animal Planet channel to produce a television series chronicling the drama of life in the wildlife rescue facility. The show experienced long-term success; it has been cited as "the longest-running animal rescue TV series".[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Portlock, Jonathan (31 December 2008). "Leatherhead's Wildlife Aid needs land (From Your Local Guardian)". www.yourlocalguardian.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  2. ^ a b c "the Big Give - About Wildlife Aid". www.thebiggive.org.uk. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  3. ^ a b "Save The Badgers - stop the badger cull - Black & White Campaign". www.blackandwhite.info. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  4. ^ "TWO THIRDS OF UK DRIVERS STOP FOR INJURED ANIMALS". www.virgin-records.co.za. 5 March 2005. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  5. ^ "Curious fox gets stuck in wheel". www.metro.co.uk. 30 May 2007. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  6. ^ "Baby badger saved from dog's jaws". news.bbc.co.uk. 2 March 2006. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Gabbert, Euan. "Elmbridge Online covering Cobham, Esher, Oxshott, Walton and Weybridge". www.elmbridge-online.co.uk. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  8. ^ "Simon Cowell MBE - 'Wildlife S.O.S' Television Presenter and Producer". www.gordonpoole.com. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 

External links[edit]