White Sands Missile Range

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White Sands Missile Range logo.jpgWhite Sands Missile Range (c1960)

White Sands Proving Ground (1945)
Alamogordo Bombing Range (1941)[1]

Part of United States Army
New Mexico, Southwestern United States
Tularosa-Basin-NM-USGS-map opaque.gif
Outline of WSMR at the Tularosa Basin
Coordinates32°33′47″N 106°34′12″W / 32.56306°N 106.57°W / 32.56306; -106.57
Built9 July 1945[2]
Built byOrdnance Corps (United States Army)[2]
Open to
the public
WSMR Museum
Controlled byTest Center Commander
GarrisonWhite Sands Missile Range Garrison]
Current
commander
BG John G. Ferrari (2011- Current) [3]
OccupantsNASA logo.svg NASA White Sands Test Facility

Air Force Research Laboratory.svg AFRL Directed Energy Directorate at North Oscura Peak
Ccm logo.gif DoD Centers for Countermeasures
[4]

White Sands Missile Range location.gif
WSMR location
 
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White Sands Missile Range logo.jpgWhite Sands Missile Range (c1960)

White Sands Proving Ground (1945)
Alamogordo Bombing Range (1941)[1]

Part of United States Army
New Mexico, Southwestern United States
Tularosa-Basin-NM-USGS-map opaque.gif
Outline of WSMR at the Tularosa Basin
Coordinates32°33′47″N 106°34′12″W / 32.56306°N 106.57°W / 32.56306; -106.57
Built9 July 1945[2]
Built byOrdnance Corps (United States Army)[2]
Open to
the public
WSMR Museum
Controlled byTest Center Commander
GarrisonWhite Sands Missile Range Garrison]
Current
commander
BG John G. Ferrari (2011- Current) [3]
OccupantsNASA logo.svg NASA White Sands Test Facility

Air Force Research Laboratory.svg AFRL Directed Energy Directorate at North Oscura Peak
Ccm logo.gif DoD Centers for Countermeasures
[4]

White Sands Missile Range location.gif
WSMR location

White Sands Missile Range (WSMR) is a rocket range of almost 3,200 square miles (8,300 km2) in parts of five counties in southern New Mexico. The largest military installation in the United States, WSMR includes the Oscura Range and the WSMR Otero Mesa bombing range.[5] WSMR and the 600,000-acre (2,400 km2) McGregor Range Complex at Fort Bliss to the south, form a contiguous swath of territory for military testing.[5]

Contents

Current operations

Chronology

1945, the Trinity explosion, 0.016 seconds after detonation.


See also

References

  1. ^ "Chapter Four: Global War at White Sands 1940–1945". White Sands Administrative History. National Park Service. http://www.nps.gov/archive/whsa/adhi/adhi4d.htm. Retrieved 7 October 2008. "Executive Order No. 9029" 
  2. ^ a b "Development of the Corporal: the embryo of the army missile program, vol. 2" (PDF). Army Ballistic Missile Agency. http://www.redstone.army.mil/history/pdf/corporal/corp2.pdf. 
  3. ^ "WSMR Official Website, Leadership Page". http://www.wsmr.army.mil/WWA/Leadership/Pages/WSMRCommander.aspx. 
  4. ^ NOTE: The Center for Countermeasures (CCM), founded 1972, is a joint program of the OSD's Director, Operational Test & Evaluation (DOT&E), which is itself a component of the OSD (OSD). The CCM evaluates precision guided munitions and other devices in counter- and counter-countermeasures environments.
  5. ^ a b Rubenson, David; Robert Everson, Jorge Munoz (Arroyo Center); Robert Weissler (RAND Corporation) (1998). McGregor Renewal and the Current Air Defense Mission. p. 77. ISBN 978-0-8330-2669-9. http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA76&lpg=PA77&dq=%22oscura+range%22&sig=ACfU3U23XQxVEVy1KwqBGxtItIwAm1vfoA&id=nJlnO6Prw5AC&ots=Ibl4fenRK5#PPA79,M1. Retrieved 15 September 2008. 
  6. ^ "Time Magazine, "Recovery at White Sands"". 29 June 1962. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,897960,00.html. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "A Brief History of White Sands Proving Ground 1941–1965". New Mexico State University. http://nmsua.edu/tiopete/files/2008/12/wspgcoldbook.pdf. Retrieved 19 August 2010. 
  8. ^ a b Ordway, Frederick I, III; Sharpe, Mitchell R (1979). The Rocket Team. Apogee Books Space Series 36. New York: Thomas Y. Crowell. pp. 290. ISBN 1-894959-00-0. 
  9. ^ a b c Ley, Willy (1951 – revised edition 1958) [1944]. Rockets, Missiles and Space Travel. New York: The Viking Press. pp. 246, 253. 
  10. ^ Bluth, John. "Von Karman, Malina laid the groundwork for the future JPL". JPL. http://www2.jpl.nasa.gov/files/universe/un940715.txt. 
  11. ^ "WSTF Community". NASA. http://www.nasa.gov/centers/wstf/about/wstfcomm.html. 
  12. ^ Richard Greenwood (14 January 1975) (PDF). National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Trinity Site. National Park Service. http://pdfhost.focus.nps.gov/docs/NHLS/Text/66000493.pdf. Retrieved 21 June 2009  and Accompanying 10 photos, from 1974. PDF (3.37 MB)
  13. ^ "Trinity Site". National Historic Landmarks. National Park Service. http://tps.cr.nps.gov/nhl/detail.cfm?ResourceID=351&resourceType=District. Retrieved 28 January 2008. 
  14. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2007-01-23. http://nrhp.focus.nps.gov/natreg/docs/All_Data.html. 
  15. ^ "White Sands V-2 Launching Site". Aviation: From Sand Dunes to Sonic Booms. http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/aviation/whi.htm. Retrieved 7 October 2008. 
  16. ^ Works by White Sands Missile Range Public Affairs Office at Project Gutenberg
  17. ^ "article". Aerospace America: p. B6. October 2004. 
  18. ^ "NASA Building Test Pad at White Sands for New Spacecraft". redOrbit. 3 February 2008. http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/1240532/nasa_building_test_pad_at_white_sands_for_new_spacecraft/index.html. Retrieved 12 September 2008. 
  19. ^ NASA: Constellation Mission Project, Research, and Test Sites Overview

External links

External media
ATEC locations

Missile Ranger newspaper
Map with call-up areas