Westwood, New Jersey

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Westwood, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Westwood
Westwood Gazebo in 2014
Westwood Gazebo in 2014
Motto: "Hub of the Pascack Valley"
Map highlighting Westwood's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Westwood's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Westwood, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Westwood, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°59′21″N 74°01′55″W / 40.989032°N 74.031872°W / 40.989032; -74.031872Coordinates: 40°59′21″N 74°01′55″W / 40.989032°N 74.031872°W / 40.989032; -74.031872[1][2]
Country United States of America
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedMay 8, 1894
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorJohn Birkner, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • ClerkKaren Hughes[4]
Area[2][6]
 • Total2.314 sq mi (5.992 km2)
 • Land2.266 sq mi (5.868 km2)
 • Water0.048 sq mi (0.124 km2)  2.07%
Area rank387th of 566 in state
42nd of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7]66 ft (20 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total10,908
 • Estimate (2012[11])11,011
 • Rank224th of 566 in state
33rd of 70 in county[12]
 • Density4,814.5/sq mi (1,858.9/km2)
 • Density rank115th of 566 in state
29th of 70 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes07675, 07677[13][14]
Area code(s)201[15]
FIPS code3400380270[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID0885442[18][2]
Websitewww.westwoodnj.gov
 
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Westwood, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Westwood
Westwood Gazebo in 2014
Westwood Gazebo in 2014
Motto: "Hub of the Pascack Valley"
Map highlighting Westwood's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Map highlighting Westwood's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Westwood, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Westwood, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°59′21″N 74°01′55″W / 40.989032°N 74.031872°W / 40.989032; -74.031872Coordinates: 40°59′21″N 74°01′55″W / 40.989032°N 74.031872°W / 40.989032; -74.031872[1][2]
Country United States of America
State New Jersey
CountyBergen
IncorporatedMay 8, 1894
Government[5]
 • TypeBorough
 • MayorJohn Birkner, Jr. (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • ClerkKaren Hughes[4]
Area[2][6]
 • Total2.314 sq mi (5.992 km2)
 • Land2.266 sq mi (5.868 km2)
 • Water0.048 sq mi (0.124 km2)  2.07%
Area rank387th of 566 in state
42nd of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7]66 ft (20 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total10,908
 • Estimate (2012[11])11,011
 • Rank224th of 566 in state
33rd of 70 in county[12]
 • Density4,814.5/sq mi (1,858.9/km2)
 • Density rank115th of 566 in state
29th of 70 in county[12]
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes07675, 07677[13][14]
Area code(s)201[15]
FIPS code3400380270[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID0885442[18][2]
Websitewww.westwoodnj.gov

Westwood (known as "The Hub of the Pascack Valley"[19]) is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 10,908,[8][9][10] reflecting a decline of 91 (-0.8%) from the 10,999 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 553 (+5.3%) from the 10,446 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Westwood was officially incorporated as a borough on May 8, 1894, from portions of Washington Township, early during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.[21][22] Isaac D. Bogert served as the first mayor of the Borough.[23] In April 1909, Westwood was enlarged through the annexation of the "Old Hook" section of the borough of Emerson, and on September 24, 1957, portions of the borough were exchanged with Emerson.[21]

Geography[edit]

Westwood is located at 40°59′21″N 74°01′55″W / 40.989032°N 74.031872°W / 40.989032; -74.031872 (40.989032,-74.031872). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.314 square miles (5.992 km2), of which, 2.266 square miles (5.868 km2) of it was land and 0.048 square miles (0.124 km2) of it (2.07%) was water.[1][2]

History[edit]

The earliest history of Westwood begins with the Lenni-Lenape Native Americans who inhabited this part of the state and shared it with the transient hunters and trappers until the permanent settlers began to enter in mid-18th century.[24] In the early 19th century, the area that would later become Westwood was within the larger political boundaries of Harrington Township, which had been established by royal charter in 1775. In 1840, the western half of Harrington Township became Washington Township, with the Hackensack River as the dividing line.[21] Washington Township was an agrarian region with isolated farmsteads. Early families, including the Hoppers and Ackermans, are buried at the Old Hook Cemetery. An 18th century mill was situated at the dammed stream near the intersection of today’s Mill Street and First Avenue. This mill was on an important east west pathway and was the first on Musquapsink Brook.[25] After operating for close to two centuries, it was almost completely ruined by an arsonist’s fire and had to be dismantled in 1910.

Historic house built around 1836

A brief description of Washington Township written in 1844 described it as a township with six stores, four schools for 135 students, six grist mills, and 14 saw mills.[26]

The first wave of concentrated development took place as the result of the coming of the Hackensack and New York Railroad in 1870, which followed the route of today's Pascack Valley Line. On March 5, 1870, service began between Westwood and New York City (via Jersey City and a ferry ride). Several small hotels were built near the depot, and in 1872 several houses in the latest European-influenced styles began to be built along Centre Avenue.[27] Old maps show that growth occurred simultaneously on the land both to the east and west of the tracks. The commercial buildings included lumber and coal sheds, stores, and a bakery. There was a chapel on the corner of Third and Park avenues. The triangular park that has played an important role as a place of community gatherings is also shown on the 1876 map.[28]

By the 1880s, Westwood had four factories, several distilleries, a new school, a laundry and grocery store, and a new Reformed Church. In 1890, following a meeting of interested residents, those favoring the incorporation of Westwood as an independent borough conducted a petition drive. By 1894, Washington Township lost one of its villages as Westwood established itself as an independent borough. Isaac D. Bogert, from a long established Bogert family, was elected mayor.[29]

In 1899, a water plant constructed by Cornelius S. DeBraun provided service to thehouses that had been built along the borough's newly laid streets.[27] By the time of the 1905 New Jersey Census, there were 234 dwellings housing a population of 1,044.[30]

Westwood Park Place decorated for the holidays. Notice that the Fire Bell is covered with a Christmas Wreath

Lincoln High School was constructed around the turn of the 20th century, which also saw the introduction of electricity, telephones, and automobiles to the town. Underwood & Underwood Stereoscope Company opened a plant during the first decades of the 20th century, and many congregations established their first chapels, which were replaced in later years as the congregations grew in numbers and wealth.[27] Following a typical pattern of development throughout the 20th century, the results are a mature railroad suburb almost covered with housing units, commercial, municipal and ecclesiastical buildings. The town still retains the open space of the triangular park at its heart.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900828
19101,870125.8%
19202,59738.9%
19304,86187.2%
19405,38810.8%
19506,76625.6%
19609,04633.7%
197011,10522.8%
198010,714−3.5%
199010,446−2.5%
200010,9995.3%
201010,908−0.8%
Est. 201211,011[11]0.9%
Population sources:
1900-1920[31] 1900-1910[32]
1910-1930[33] 1900-2010[34][35][36]
2000[37][38] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,908 people, 4,438 households, and 2,858 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,814.5 per square mile (1,858.9 /km2). There were 4,636 housing units at an average density of 2,046.2 per square mile (790.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 82.98% (9,052) White, 4.62% (504) Black or African American, 0.31% (34) Native American, 7.38% (805) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.77% (302) from other races, and 1.93% (211) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.58% (1,263) of the population.[8]

There were 4,438 households, of which 29.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.6% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

In the borough, 21.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $79,133 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,195) and the median family income was $107,966 (+/- $10,189). Males had a median income of $70,598 (+/- $14,566) versus $52,721 (+/- $10,753) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $40,839 (+/- $2,990). About 1.8% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 4.7% of those age 65 or over.[39]

Same-sex couples headed 21 households in 2010, an increase from the 19 counted in 2000.[40]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 10,999 people, 4,485 households, and 2,879 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,745.0 people per square mile (1,830.5/km2). There were 4,610 housing units at an average density of 1,988.8 per square mile (767.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 86.60% White, 5.72% African American, 0.14% Native American, 4.39% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.67% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.00% of the population.[37][38]

There were 4,485 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 31.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.08.[37][38]

In the borough the population was spread out with 21.5% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 23.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 90.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.[37][38]

The median income for a household in the borough was $59,868, and the median income for a family was $77,105. Males had a median income of $50,800 versus $42,459 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,083. About 1.8% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 8.7% of those age 65 or over.[37][38]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Westwood is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a mayor directly elected by the voters and a six-member Borough Council. The Mayor serves a four-year term of office, and the Borough Council members serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5] The Borough form of government used by Westwood, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances, which can be overridden with a 2/3 vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, with most appointments are made by the mayor subject to the advice and consent of the council.[41]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Westwood is Democrat John Birkner, Jr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Westwood Borough Council are Council President John J. Sciara (R, 2014), Ray Arroyo (R, 2015), Peter A. Grefrath (R, 2015), Robert W. Miller (R, 2013), William C. Phayre (R, 2015), Ingrid H. Quinn (R, 2013) and Cynthia L. Waneck (R, 2014).[42][43][44][45][46][47][48][49]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Westwood is located in the 5th Congressional District[50] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[9][51][52]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[53] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[54][55] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[56][57]

The 39th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Bob Schroeder (R, Washington Township, Bergen County).[58] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[59] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[60]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[61] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[62] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[63] As of 2014, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[64] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[65] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[66] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[67] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[68] James J. Tedesco, III (D, 2015; Paramus)[69] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[70][71] Countywide constitutional officials are County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale),[72] Sheriff Michael Saudino (R),[73] Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill)[74][75][61]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 6,847 registered voters in Westwood, of which 1,805 (26.4% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,986 (29.0% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 3,049 (44.5% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[76] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 62.8% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 80.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[76][77]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,701 votes here (50.4% vs. 54.8% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 2,564 votes (47.9% vs. 43.5%) and other candidates with 49 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 5,355 ballots cast by the borough's 7,151 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.9% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[78][79] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 2,915 votes here (51.5% vs. 53.9% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 2,657 votes (46.9% vs. 44.5%) and other candidates with 47 votes (0.8% vs. 0.8%), among the 5,664 ballots cast by the borough's 7,130 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.4% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[80][81] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,795 votes here (51.4% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 2,576 votes (47.4% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 47 votes (0.9% vs. 0.7%), among the 5,436 ballots cast by the borough's 6,837 registered voters, for a turnout of 79.5% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[82]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 4,288 votes here (62.9% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 2,104 votes (30.8% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 352 votes (5.2% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 26 votes (0.4% vs. 0.5%), among the 6,822 ballots cast by the borough's 12,051 registered voters, yielding a 56.6% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[83]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for grades Kindergarten through 12 attend the Westwood Regional School District, a comprehensive regional school district serving both Washington Township and Westwood that is the county's only regional K-12 district.[84] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[85]) are four elementary schools — Berkeley Avenue Elementary School[86] (287 students; grades K-5), Brookside Elementary School[87] (371; K-5), Jessie F. George Elementary School[88] (354; PreK-5), Washington Elementary School[89] (318; K-5) — Westwood Regional Middle School[90] (411; 6-7, opened in Fall 2010) and Westwood Regional High School[91] (973; 8-12).[92]

As of the 2010-11 school year, Ketler Elementary School, which had served K-4, was shifted to become Westwood Regional Middle School for grades 6 and 7, while the other elementary schools would all serve K through 5, and the high school was shifted to grades 8-12 (from 7-12).[93]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[94][95]

Zion Lutheran School, adjacent the eponymous church founded in 1905, is a private school for students in Kindergarten through eighth grade.[citation needed]

Westwood is also home to The Healing Hands Institute for Massage Therapy.[citation needed]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 39.29 miles (63.23 km) of roadways, of which 31.23 miles (50.26 km) are maintained by the municipality and 8.06 miles (12.97 km) by Bergen County.[96]

County Route 503 and County Route 502 pass through Westwood.

Public transportation[edit]

Westwood is served by New Jersey Transit at the Westwood train station, located at Broadway and Westwood Avenue.[97] The Pascack Valley Line runs north-south to Hoboken Terminal with connections via the Secaucus Junction transfer station to New York Penn Station and to other NJ Transit rail service. Connections are available at Hoboken Terminal to other New Jersey Transit rail lines, the PATH train at the Hoboken PATH station, New York Waterways ferry service to the World Financial Center and other destinations and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service.[98]

New Jersey Transit bus route 165 serves Westwood with service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan. Westwood is the terminus for bus route 165.[99]

Rockland Coaches offers service to the Port Authority Bus Terminal on routes 11T/11AT, 14ET and 46/47, and to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station on route 11C and 14K.[100][101]

Shopping and entertainment[edit]

The Westwood Plaza, is an outdoor shopping mall that has a Kmart and other stores and restaurants.

The Fritz Deitl Ice Rink, which opened in 1958, is home to Doug Brown Power Skating programs and offers open ice sessions, figure skating lessons, skating school, and Stick Time open hockey.[102]

Points of interest[edit]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Westwood include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Westwood. Accessed July 23, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 165.
  6. ^ GCT-PH1: Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- Place and (in selected states) County Subdivision from 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Westwood, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Westwood borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 16. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Westwood borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Westwood, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Westwood, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  16. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Brief History of Westwood, Borough of Westwood. Accessed March 28, 2007.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 7, 2012.
  21. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 88. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  22. ^ Harvey, Cornelius Burnham. Genealogical History of Hudson and Bergen Counties, New Jersey, p. 11, New Jersey Genealogical Publishing Company, 1900. Accessed September 1, 2013. "For a period of sixteen years following the passage of this act few boroughs were organized in the State, only three of them being in Bergen County.... As it was twenty-six boroughs were in the county from January 23, 1894, to December 18, of the same year."
  23. ^ Burrow, Megan. "Mayors portrait project is complete", Pascack Valley Community Life, February 18, 2010. Accessed September 1, 2013. "Westwood Heritage Society member Jim Gines, who bears a striking resemblance to Westwood's first mayor, Isaac D. Bogert, said it was lucky that the older pictures were preserved so well."
  24. ^ Brief History, Borough of Westwood. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  25. ^ Howard I. Durie, “Bogert’s Mill, Westwood; The Earliest Pascack Mill Site,” 1990; pp. 8, 23.
  26. ^ Barber, John W.; and Howe, Henry. Historical Collections of the State of New Jersey, (1844); p. 85
  27. ^ a b c Joseph Oettinger, Jr. “Westwood Time Line 1861-1905,” 2006.
  28. ^ Walker’s 1876 Atlas of Bergen County
  29. ^ Rogers, Georgia and Knopf, Edward. History of Westwood, Bergen County and New Jersey (Westwood, NJ: The Westwood Press, Inc., 1942); p. 32
  30. ^ Meeker, Ellis R. New Jersey: A Historical, Commercial and Industrial Review. (Elizabeth, N.J.: Commonwealth Publishing Co., 1906).
  31. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  32. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  33. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 714. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  34. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  35. ^ Bergen County Data Book 2003, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed July 23, 2013.
  36. ^ Historical Population Trends in Bergen County (1900-2010), Bergen County Department of Planning & Economic Development, 2011. Accessed December 23, 2013.
  37. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Westwood borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  38. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Westwood borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed March 3, 2013.
  39. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Westwood borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 11, 2012.
  40. ^ Lipman, Harvy; and Sheingold, Dave. "North Jersey sees 30% growth in same-sex couples", The Record (Bergen County), August 14, 2011. Accessed March 20, 2013.
  41. ^ Cerra, Michael F. "Forms of Government: Everything You've Always Wanted to Know, But Were Afraid to Ask", New Jersey State League of Municipalities. Accessed December 23, 2013.
  42. ^ Mayor and Council, Borough of Westwood. Accessed December 23, 2013.
  43. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Westwood. Accessed December 23, 2013.
  44. ^ Bergen County Directory 2012 - 2013, Bergen County, New Jersey. Accessed December 21, 2013.
  45. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2012, Bergen County Clerk, November 6, 2012. Accessed December 23, 2013.
  46. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2011, Bergen County Clerk, November 17, 2011. Accessed December 23, 2013.
  47. ^ Bergen County Statement of Vote General Election 2010, Bergen County Clerk, November 10, 2010. Accessed December 23, 2013.
  48. ^ Redmond, Kimberley. "Westwood holds 119th reorganization meeting", Pascacak Valley Community Life, February 4, 2013. Accessed July 23, 2013. "The Borough of Westwood held its annual reorganization meeting on Jan. 3, during which incumbent Peter Grefrath and newcomer Ray Arroyo were sworn-in to full-terms on the Westwood Borough Council. In November, the two Republicans were elected to three-year terms on the council, beating out Democratic candidates David Fischer and Ruth Nass. All six council members are Republicans and are headed up by Democratic Mayor John Birkner, Jr."
  49. ^ Bergen County 2012 -2013 Director, Bergen County, New Jersey Clerk, June 2012. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  50. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  51. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 66, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  52. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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