Westinghouse Electric (1886)

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Westinghouse Electric Corporation
Former typePublic
FateDissolved
SuccessorsWestinghouse Electric Company, Westinghouse Licensing Corporation, Viacom
FoundedPittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. (January 8, 1886 (1886-01-08))
FoundersGeorge Westinghouse
Defunct1999 (1999)
HeadquartersMonroeville, Pennsylvania, United States
Area servedworldwide
SubsidiariesCBS
 
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This article is about the defunct Westinghouse Electric Corporation founded in 1886, renamed CBS Corporation in 1997, and purchased by Viacom in 1999. For the present-day industrial company, see Westinghouse Electric Company. For other uses of the term "Westinghouse" including modern incarnations and recent licensing deals, see Westinghouse (disambiguation).
Westinghouse Electric Corporation
Former typePublic
FateDissolved
SuccessorsWestinghouse Electric Company, Westinghouse Licensing Corporation, Viacom
FoundedPittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S. (January 8, 1886 (1886-01-08))
FoundersGeorge Westinghouse
Defunct1999 (1999)
HeadquartersMonroeville, Pennsylvania, United States
Area servedworldwide
SubsidiariesCBS

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation was an American manufacturing company. It was founded on January 8, 1886, as Westinghouse Electric Company and later renamed Westinghouse Electric Corporation by George Westinghouse. George Westinghouse had previously founded the Westinghouse Air Brake Company. The company purchased CBS in 1995 and became CBS Corporation in 1997.

In 1998, CBS established a brand licensing subsidiary Westinghouse Licensing Corporation (Westinghouse Electric Corporation). A year later, CBS sold all of its nuclear power businesses to British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL). Soon after, BNFL gained license rights on the Westinghouse trademarks and they used those to reorganize their acquired assets as Westinghouse Electric Company. That company was sold to Toshiba in 2007.

History[edit]

Westinghouse Electric was founded by George Westinghouse in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1886. The firm became active in helping to bring electricity throughout the United States. The company's largest factories were located in East Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where they made turbines and coils for electricity.[1] In addition to George Westinghouse, engineers working for the company included William Stanley, Nikola Tesla, Vladimir Zworykin, Oliver B. Shallenberger, Stephen Timoshenko, Benjamin Garver Lamme and his sister Bertha Lamme. The company was historically the rival to General Electric which was founded by George Westinghouse's arch-rival, Thomas Edison (see War of the Currents).

Products and sponsorships[edit]

The company pioneered long-distance power transmission and high-voltage alternating-current transmission, unveiling the technology for lighting in Great Barrington, Massachusetts.[citation needed]

The company is also known for its time capsule contributions during the 1939 New York World's Fair and 1964 New York World's Fair.[citation needed] They also participated in the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904. They sponsored the Westinghouse Auditorium at the fair, where they showed films documenting Westinghouse products and company plants.[1]

Westinghouse produced the first operational American turbojet, but fumbled on the disastrous J40 project. It not only severely hampered a generation of U.S. Navy jets when the project had to be abandoned, but led to leaving the aircraft engine business in the 1950s.

Timeline of company evolution[edit]

George Westinghouse
Pittsburgh Plant (before 1888)

1880s[edit]

Starting years

1890s[edit]

Alternating currents promoter

1900s to 1920s[edit]

Growth and change

1930s and 1940s[edit]

Close up of Westinghouse logo on historic kitchen stove at John & Mable Ringling Museum, Sarasota

1950s to 1970s[edit]

Pittsburgh Westinghouse Sign, 1967.

1980s[edit]

1990s to 2000s[edit]

CEOs[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Steam Hammer, Westinghouse Works, 1904". World Digital Library. 1904-05. Retrieved 2013-07-28.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ John W. Klooster, Icons of Invention: The Makers of the Modern World from Gutenberg to Gates, page 305. Books.google.com. 30 July 2009. Retrieved 10 September 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s "Westinghouse: Chronology". Ketupa.net. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  4. ^ Westinghouse Company Enters Wireless Field (1920). Earlyradiohistory.us (1920-10-16). Retrieved on 2013-11-02.
  5. ^ "Westinghouse Electric Corporation". ExplorePaHistory.com. 
  6. ^ Feurer R (2006). Radical Unionism in the Midwest, 1900–1950. University of Illinois Press. 
  7. ^ "Heartland of UE Struggle". UE. September 2002. Retrieved 2008-04-20. 
  8. ^ "Westinghouse Sign". Pittsburgh Press. 16 January 1968. p. 49. 
  9. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=sclaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=c2wDAAAAIBAJ&dq=westinghouse%20bay%20area&pg=5072%2C1046464
  10. ^ "Three Decades of Wall Street's Muzak Fixation - Ray Gustini". The Atlantic Wire. March 24, 2011. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  11. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=gtVRAAAAIBAJ&sjid=RG4DAAAAIBAJ&pg=4275%2C2365340
  12. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Who Killed Westinghouse? - In the beginning". Old.post-gazette.com. March 12, 1914. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  13. ^ http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=PuUcAAAAIBAJ&sjid=H5YEAAAAIBAJ&pg=7171%2C299791
  14. ^ Gwilym A. Price, 89, a high school dropout who became... - Orlando Sentinel. Articles.orlandosentinel.com (1985-06-04). Retrieved on 2013-08-18.
  15. ^ http://www.marspapers.org/papers/Shirk_2011_contrib.pdf
  16. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Who Killed Westinghouse? - Chapter 1: Doing Well by Doing Good". Old.post-gazette.com. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  17. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Who Killed Westinghouse? - Chapter 2: Sue Me, Sue You Blues". Old.post-gazette.com. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  18. ^ Douglas Danforth: Executive Profile & Biography - Businessweek. Investing.businessweek.com. Retrieved on 2013-11-02.
  19. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Who Killed Westinghouse? - Chapter 3: Money, It's a Hit". Old.post-gazette.com. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  20. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Who Killed Westinghouse? - Chapter 4: Big Money and Bad Choices". Old.post-gazette.com. June 29, 1990. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  21. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Who Killed Westinghouse? - Chapter 5: Coming Apart at the Seams". Old.post-gazette.com. January 15, 1991. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Who Killed Westinghouse? - Chapter 6: Free at Last". Old.post-gazette.com. Retrieved April 20, 2013. 

External links[edit]