Wendy Davis (politician)

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Wendy Davis
Member of the Texas Senate
from the 10th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
2009
Preceded byKim Brimer
Personal details
Born(1963-05-16) May 16, 1963 (age 49)
Fort Worth, Texas
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
ChildrenAmber, Dru
ResidenceFort Worth
Alma materTexas Christian University, Harvard Law School
OccupationAttorney
CommitteesEducation, Transportation and Homeland Security, Veterans' Affairs and Military Installations, International Relations and Trade, Open Government (Vice-Chair)
WebsiteOfficial website
 
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Wendy Davis
Member of the Texas Senate
from the 10th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
2009
Preceded byKim Brimer
Personal details
Born(1963-05-16) May 16, 1963 (age 49)
Fort Worth, Texas
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
ChildrenAmber, Dru
ResidenceFort Worth
Alma materTexas Christian University, Harvard Law School
OccupationAttorney
CommitteesEducation, Transportation and Homeland Security, Veterans' Affairs and Military Installations, International Relations and Trade, Open Government (Vice-Chair)
WebsiteOfficial website

Wendy Davis is an American politician who represents District 10 in the Texas Senate. She previously served on the Fort Worth city council.

Contents

Early life and education

Wendy Davis was born on May 16, 1963 and grew up in Fort Worth, Texas. Raised by a single mother, Davis began working at age 14 to help support her family. By 19, Davis became a single mother herself. After learning about a two-year paralegal program from a co-worker, Davis enrolled at Tarrant County College and later transferred to Texas Christian University, where she graduated first in her class. After becoming the first person in her family to graduate from college, Davis went on to earn her law degree with honors from Harvard Law School.[1]

Law career

Early in her law career, Davis served in a federal clerkship under U.S. District Judge Jerry Buchmeyer. In 1994, she joined the Fort Worth office of Haynes & Boone and began practicing specialized litigation. She later became part owner of Safeco Title Co. and served as Chief Executive Officer of Republic Title's Fort Worth Division from 2004 to 2009. Davis joined Cantey Hanger in an Of Counsel role and partnered with Brian Newby to open Newby Davis, PLLC in 2010. Her current practice includes federal and local governmental affairs, litigation, economic development, contract compliance and real estate matters.[2]

Political career

City Council

Davis was first elected to the Fort Worth city council in 1999. She was re-elected in 2001, 2003, 2005 and 2007. During her nine-year tenure as a councilmember, Davis focused on transportation, economic development and neighborhood issues. She also spearheaded economic development projects, such as the Montgomery Plaza renovation, the Tower, Pier One and Radio Shack campuses.[2]

State Senate

Davis represents Texas Senate, District 10, which includes portions of Tarrant County, Texas. In 2008, she defeated Republican Kim Brimer for the seat.[3] She was re-elected in 2012, defeating a challenge from Mark Shelton, a Fort Worth pediatrician and Republican member of the Texas House of Representatives.[4]

Davis is the Vice-Chair on the Senate Committee on International Relations and Trade and the Senate Select Committee on Open Government. She is also a Member of the Senate Committee on Education, the Senate Committee on Transportation and Homeland Security, and the Veteran Affairs and Military Installations Committee.[5]

In 2011, Davis launched a filibuster of a budget bill that cut $4 billion from public education in the state, resulting in a special session called by Texas Gov. Rick Perry.[6]

Davis has been honored with many awards and recognitions during her first term in the Texas Legislature, including the "Bold Woman Award" from Girls, Inc., "Freshman of the Year" from AARP, "Champion for Children Award" from the Equity Center, and "Texas Women's Health Champion Award" from the Texas Association of OB-GYNs. In 2009, Texas Monthly named her "Rookie of the Year".[7] She was also chosen by the readers of Fort Worth Weekly as the "Best Servant of the People".[1] Davis was recently listed among "12 State Legislators to Watch in 2012" by Governing Magazine[8] and is mentioned as a possible candidate for state-wide races.[9]

Election history

Davis ran unopposed for city council in 2001 and 2005 and for state senator in the 2008 and 2012 Democratic primaries.

2012 election

Texas general election, 2012: Senate District 10[10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
DemocraticWendy Davis (Incumbent)147,00551.11
RepublicanMark Shelton140,60348.88
Majority6,4022.23
Democratic holdSwing

2008 election

Texas general election, 2008: Senate District 10[10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
RepublicanKim Brimer (Incumbent)140,73747.52-11.73
DemocraticWendy Davis147,83249.94+9.17
LibertarianRichard A. Cross7,5912.56+2.56
Majority7,0952.42
Democratic gain from RepublicanSwing+9.19

Previous elections

2007

Fort Worth City Council general election, 2007: District 9[11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
nonpartisanBernie Scheffler40623.39
nonpartisanWendy Davis1,33076.61+8.4
Majority92453.2216.8

2003

Fort Worth City Council general election, 2003: District 9[12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
nonpartisanWendy R. Davis2,58168.21+17.46
nonpartisanBill Ray1,20331.79
Majority137836.42+22.06

1999

Fort Worth City Council general election, 1999: District 9[13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
nonpartisanWendy R. Davis1,82050.75
nonpartisanDavid Minor1,47141.02
nonpartisanDan Roberts2958.23
Majority3499.73

Arson attempt

On March 20, 2012, a pair of Molotov cocktails were thrown at State Sen. Davis' office in Fort Worth. Davis was not in the office at the time though two of her staffers were. There were no injuries.[14] Cedric Steele, a homeless man with a history of mental illness, was arrested for the attack.[15]

References

  1. ^ a b "Senator Wendy Davis: District 10". Texas State Senate. http://www.davis.senate.state.tx.us/.
  2. ^ a b "Partners - Newby Davis, PLLC". http://www.murraybranding.com/ND/Newby_Davis/Partners.html.
  3. ^ "Wendy Davis Defeats Sen. Kim Brimer". Quorum Report. http://www.quorumreport.com/Quorum_Report_Daily_Buzz_2008/wendy_davis_defeats_sen_kim_brimer_as_dems_continu_buzziid12870.html.
  4. ^ "Wendy Davis Clinches Re-election in SD-10". Texas Tribune. http://www.texastribune.org/texas-politics/2012-legislative-election/wendy-davis-clinches-re-election-sd-10/.
  5. ^ "Texas Tribune - State Sen. Wendy Davis". Texas Tribune. http://www.texastribune.org/directory/wendy-davis/.
  6. ^ "A Filibuster Creates an Overnight Celebrity". New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2011/06/05/us/05ttdavis.html.
  7. ^ "The Best and Worst Legislators 2009". Texas Monthly. http://www.texasmonthly.com/preview/2009-07-01/feature2.
  8. ^ "12 State Legislators to Watch in 2012". Governing Magazine. http://www.governing.com/topics/politics/gov-12-state-legislators-to-watch-in-2012.html.
  9. ^ "Is Sen. Wendy Davis poised for statewide race?". Star-Telegraph. http://www.star-telegram.com/2013/01/19/4560152/is-sen-wendy-davis-poised-for.html.
  10. ^ a b "Election Results". Secretary of State of Texas. https://team1.sos.state.tx.us/enr/results/nov06_164_county219.htm. Retrieved 2012-11-19.
  11. ^ "2007 Cumulative Election Report" (PDF). City of Fort Worth. p. 3. http://www.fortworthgov.org/uploadedFiles/City_Secretary/City_Council/Elections/2007_General_Election/Official%20Results.pdf. Retrieved 2010-10-16.
  12. ^ "2003 Cumulative Election Report". City of Fort Worth. http://www.fortworthgov.org/citysecretary/info/default.aspx?id=5070. Retrieved 2010-10-16.
  13. ^ "1999 Cumulative Election Report". City of Fort Worth. http://www.fortworthgov.org/citysecretary/info/default.aspx?id=5066. Retrieved 2010-10-16.
  14. ^ "Molotov cocktails thrown at Democratic Texas state senator's office". Fox News. 2012-03-20. http://www.foxnews.com/us/2012/03/20/molotov-cocktails-thrown-at-democratic-texas-state-senators-office/.
  15. ^ http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/Family-says-firebomb-suspect-has-a-history-of-mental-illness-143758486.html

External links

Texas Senate
Preceded by
Kim Brimer
Texas State Senator
from District 10 (Fort Worth)

2009 – present
Incumbent