Weehawken Port Imperial

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Port Imperial
8.24.09PortImperialByLuigiNovi1.jpg
The Port Imperial Hudson–Bergen Light Rail platform, which also contains a pedestrian bridge to the Ferry Terminal to Midtown and Lower Manhattan
Station statistics
AddressPort Imperial Boulevard
Weehawken, New Jersey
Coordinates40°46′33″N 74°00′46″W / 40.7759°N 74.0129°W / 40.7759; -74.0129Coordinates: 40°46′33″N 74°00′46″W / 40.7759°N 74.0129°W / 40.7759; -74.0129
Line(s)
ConnectionsNJT Bus NJT Bus: 23, 156R, 158, and 159R
BSicon BOOT.svg New York Waterway
Platforms1 island platform
Tracks2
Other information
OpenedOctober 29, 2005
Electrified750 V (DC) overhead catenary
AccessibleHandicapped/disabled access
Owned byNew Jersey Transit
Fare zone1
Traffic
Passengers (2006)76,440 Steady 0%
Services
Preceding station Hudson–Bergen Light Rail Following station
West Side–Tonnelle
toward Hoboken
Hoboken–Tonnelle
 
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Weehawken Port Imperial from Hudson Palisades

Weehawken Port Imperial is an intermodal transit hub on the Weehawken, New Jersey waterfront of the Hudson River across from Midtown Manhattan served by New York Waterway ferries and buses, Hudson–Bergen Light Rail, and NJT buses. The district lies under and at the foot of Pershing Road, a thoroughfare which travels along the face of the Hudson Palisades, which rise to its west. The Hudson River Waterfront Walkway runs along the shoreline and is abutted by recently constructed residential neighborboods, Lincoln Harbor to the south and Bulls Ferry to the north.

History[edit]

Extensive yards lined the shore

Early ferries and railroads[edit]

The North Hudson waterfront is located north of Weehawken Cove on a long narrow strip of land between the Hudson River and Hudson Palisades. On April 18, 1670 the government of the Province of New Jersey confirmed a grant to Maryn Adriaensen for a parcel of land called Wiehacken in the jurisdiction of Bergen on Hobooken Creek, 50 morgen Dutch measure originally given on May 11, 1647. Sporadic ferry service began and in 1700 a royal patent was given by Richard Coote, 1st Earl of Bellomont[1] which led to the naming of Weehawken Street at the landing across the river in today's West Village. Later called Slough's Meadow, the waterfront has in the last centuries been transformed from an tidal marsh[2] to an extensive rail and shipping port and, since the 1980s, redeveloped for commercial, residential, recreational, and transportation uses. Many duels, including the nation's most famous between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr in 1804, took place on a site later obliterated by rail infrastructure of the West Shore Railroad (also used by (New York, Ontario and Western) and the Erie Railroad[3][4] Erie's Pier D and Piershed is a remnant of the rail era listed on the New Jersey Register of Historic Places in 1984.[5]

The turn of the 20th century saw the growth of the railyards, carfloats, ferry slips, and passenger station of Weehawken Terminal. The main ferry ran to 42nd Street and for short time was a component of the transcontinental Lincoln Highway. The highway and the trolleys of North Hudson County Railway and later the Public Service Railway ascended Pershing Road. The Weehawken was the last ferry to the West Shore Terminal on March 25, 1959 at 1:10 am.[6] and train service was discontinued. The right of way (originally part of the NYC's New Jersey Junction Railroad) was later used by the Penn Central River Division [7] and the Conrail River Line before being abandoned. The United Fruit Company once maintained the largest banana warehouse in the United States adjacent to its berths.[8][9][10] As with much of the traditional harbor of the Port of New York and New Jersey, the infrastructure became obsolete as passenger and freight transport patterns changed.

Post-industrial era[edit]

The restoration of rail and ferry services is of a much smaller scale. In 1981 Arthur Edward Imperatore, Sr., trucking magnate, purchased a 2.5 miles (4.0 km) length of the Weehawken Yard from the bankrupt Penn Central for $7.5 million, his surname an inspiration for Port Imperial. New York Waterway was established in 1986.[11] Service was originally provided from a converted ferry moored at the shore next to the marina south of the current terminal.[12][13] NJT contracted the extensive renovation and waterproofing of the Weehawken Tunnel under Bergen Hill which had been built in 1861.[14][15][16] The new ferry terminal, built and owned by New Jersey Transit and leased by NY Waterway,[17] opened in May 2006.[18][19][20][21] The HBLR Station opened for weekend service in November 2005[22] and full-time service on October 29, 2006.[23] The construction and maintenance of stairways from atop the cliffs at Boulevard East to the station and the bridge from the station to the ferry slips have been a source of contention and controversy. The area, still under ≠≠≠≠≠development,[24] is considered to be too oriented to automobiles, rather than pedestrians.[25] While there has been some integration in the wider public transportation system, some transportation is geared within the development site, including parking lots.[26][27][28]

In 2009, New York Waterway was instrumental in the rescue of passengers on US Airways Flight 1549, which made an emergency landing on the Hudson River near Port Imperial.[29] A memorial to the September 11 attacks was unveiled on the event's 10th anniversary.[30]

The district along the Hudson Waterfront has expanded to become a commercial, residential, and recreational neighborhood.[31] In June 2011, ground was broken on 850-space garage and retail space building, across from the ferry terminal.[32][33] In October 2011, the hub was announced as the site of the Port Imperial Street Circuit, a motorsport venue hosting the Grand Prix of America, a round of the Formula One World Championship.[34] The start-finish line and pit facilities for the event will be directly opposite the ferry terminal, and the area is being further redeveloped for the race.[35] In June 2013, a long-awaited bridge connecting the ferry terminal and loght right station was open.[36][37]

Service[edit]

Ferry terminal as seen from the Palisades

In June 2012, NJT and NY Waterway began a fare-sharing program for riders transferring between the light rail and ferries for ten-trip and monthly tickets holders.[38] in a program called Surf and Turf[39] In May 2013 NY Waterway initiated afternoon bus service along the NJT bus routes 158, and 159R, which travel north to Fort Lee, and 156R, with continuing service to Englewood Cliffs.[40][41]

Port Imperial
8.24.09PortImperialByLuigiNovi1.jpg
The Port Imperial Hudson–Bergen Light Rail platform, which also contains a pedestrian bridge to the Ferry Terminal to Midtown and Lower Manhattan
Station statistics
AddressPort Imperial Boulevard
Weehawken, New Jersey
Coordinates40°46′33″N 74°00′46″W / 40.7759°N 74.0129°W / 40.7759; -74.0129Coordinates: 40°46′33″N 74°00′46″W / 40.7759°N 74.0129°W / 40.7759; -74.0129
Line(s)
ConnectionsNJT Bus NJT Bus: 23, 156R, 158, and 159R
BSicon BOOT.svg New York Waterway
Platforms1 island platform
Tracks2
Other information
OpenedOctober 29, 2005
Electrified750 V (DC) overhead catenary
AccessibleHandicapped/disabled access
Owned byNew Jersey Transit
Fare zone1
Traffic
Passengers (2006)76,440 Steady 0%
Services
Preceding station Hudson–Bergen Light Rail Following station
West Side–Tonnelle
toward Hoboken
Hoboken–Tonnelle
Stairways to station

Ferry[edit]

destinationlocationtransfer
West Midtown Ferry Terminal[42]
Midtown Manhattan
Pier 79
West Side Highway-West 39th St
Javits Convention Center
free transfer to Manhattan "loop" buses
Battery Park City Ferry Terminal
at World Financial Center[43]
Hudson River Park at Vesey Street
Battery Park City
paid transfer to Liberty Water Taxi & NY Waterway routes
Pier 11 at Wall Street[44]South Street
south of Wall Street & South Street Seaport
paid transfer to New York Water Taxi,
NY Waterway, and SeaStreak routes

Light rail[edit]

Destinationroutetransfers
Tonnelle
westbound
BergenlineAt Bergenline:
NJT buses and guaguas
Hoboken Terminal
southbound
Lincoln Harbor
Hoboken
At Hoboken Terminal:
PATH to Midtown Manhattan
NJT/MTA Rail
Hudson Place bus station
West Side
Jersey City
southbound
Lincoln Harbor
Hoboken
Downtown Jersey City
At Exchange Place:
PATH to WTC, Journal Square, Newark Penn Station
NJT buses
BayonneGreenville and Bayonne require transfer at stations between Pavonia-Newport and Liberty State Park.

Bus[edit]

Routedestinationmajor pointsnotes
River Road
northbound
WNY[45]
Edgewater LandingBulls Ferry
Shadyside
Edgewater
AM and PM rush hour service for ferry passengers
23/123
northbound
NJT[46]
Nungessers
AM and PM rush hour service
Boulevard EastNJT-NY Waterway fare-sharing[47][48]
156R
northbound
NJT[49]
GWB Plaza
Englewood Cliffs
Bulls Ferry
Shadyside
Edgewater
Palisade Avenue
via Gorge Road
no Sunday service
156R

southbound
NJT[50]
Port Authority Bus Terminal
42nd Street (Manhattan)
Lincoln Harbor
Lincoln Tunnel
no Sunday service
158
northbound
NJT[51]
GWB Plaza
Fort Lee
Bulls Ferry
Shadyside
Edgewater Commoms
Edgewater Landing
158

southbound
NJT[52]
Port Authority Bus Terminal
42nd Street (Manhattan)
Lincoln Harbor
Lincoln Tunnel
159R

northbound
NJT[53]
GWB Plaza
Fort Lee
Bulls Ferry
Shadyside
Edgewater
Palisade Avenue
via Gorge Road
no weekend service
159R

southbound
NJT[53]
Port Authority Bus Terminal
42nd Street (Manhattan)
Lincoln Harbor
Lincoln Tunnel
bus stop at top of public stairway
Boulevard East

northbound
NJT 128, 165, 166, 168 to Nungessers & Bergen County
Boulevard East

southbound
NJT 128, 165, 166, 168 to Port Authority Bus Terminal

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ History of the Hudson River Ferries
  2. ^ New York Historical Society (1995). Jackson, Kenneth T., ed. The Encyclopedia of New York City. New Haven: Yale University Press. pp. 398–400. ISBN 0-300-05536-6. 
  3. ^ North Hudson 1884 map
  4. ^ Erie Railroad Weehawken facilities
  5. ^ New Jersey Register of Historic Places in Hudson County
  6. ^ Adams, Arthur G. (1996). The Hudson Through the Years. Fordham University Press. ISBN 978-0-8232-1676-5. 
  7. ^ Penn Central Rivier Division map
  8. ^ McCarten, John (July 4, 1959). "Harbor Display". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2011-01-27. 
  9. ^ Banana Building site
  10. ^ EPA-IMPACT 2000
  11. ^ Carroll, Timothy J. (October 11, 2009). "20 years crossing the Hudson". The Jersey City Reporter (Hoboken: Hudson Reporter). pp. 7 & 16. Retrieved 2010-05-07. 
  12. ^ Tri-State Transportation Campaign
  13. ^ Hiss, Anthony (December 22, 1986). "Ferryboat Comeback". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  14. ^ [pubsindex.trb.org/view.aspx?id=700173 Weehawken Tunnel]
  15. ^ Weehawken Bergen Tunnel
  16. ^ ROW at western portal
  17. ^ "Weehawken Ferry Terminal Project Unveiled at NJ Transit Board of Directors Meeting" (Press release). New Jersey Transit. July 11, 2001. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  18. ^ "Media Advisory: Port Imperial Ferry Terminal Ribbon Cutting Ceremony in Weehawken on Monday" (Press release). New Jersey Transit. May 19, 2006. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  19. ^ NY Waterway Weehawken Terminal
  20. ^ Weehawken Ferry Terminal description and photo
  21. ^ McGeehan, Patrick (May 23, 2006). "$44 Million Ferry Terminal Is to Open in Weehawken". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  22. ^ Hague, Jim (November 8, 2005). "Light Rail moves up the coast Will offer weekend service through Weehawken; next stop, Union City and North Bergen". Hudson Reporter. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  23. ^ Weehawken Tunnel Photos (The Subway Nut.com)
  24. ^ Port Imperial North and South
  25. ^ Allocca, Sean (August 8, 2010). "Getting pedestrians to the waterfront". Hudson Reporter. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  26. ^ Port imperial local shuttles
  27. ^ Hoboken Reporter
  28. ^ Diaz, Lana Rose (April 25, 2010). "Don’t try this at home". Hudson Reporter. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  29. ^ Applebome, Peter (January 18, 2009). "A Small Town’s Recurring Role as a Rescue Beacon". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-11-28. 
  30. ^ Mestanza, Jean-Pierre (April 20, 2011). "Weehawken breaks ground on 9/11 memorial". The Jersey Journal. Retrieved 2011-07-29. 
  31. ^ Martin, Antoinette (May 28, 2006). "Where Manhattan is the biggest Amenity". The New York Times. Retrieved 2013-10-01. 
  32. ^ "Weehawken Twp. and Roseland Property Company Break Ground on Ferry Parking Garage at Port Imperial". Cahncom Real Estate Round-up. cahnroundup.com. July 7, 2011. Retrieved 2011-12-2011. 
  33. ^ Mestanza, Jean-Paul (June 30, 2011), "Weehawken breaks ground on 850-space garage at ferry terminal", The Jersey Journal, retrieved 2011-12-19 
  34. ^ Elizalde, Pablo (2011-10-25). "New Jersey confirms F1 grand prix from the 2013 season". Autosport.com (Haymarket Press). Archived from the original on 25 October 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-25. 
  35. ^ "Briefs" The Union City Reporter. December 18, 2011. Page 2
  36. ^ Wenik, Ian (June 9, 2013). "Open at last After long wait, pedestrian bridge connects light rail and ferry". Hudson Reporter. Retrieved 2013-07-011. 
  37. ^ Cichowksi, John (June 11, 2013). "Road Warrior: $9.7M footbridge needs more feet". The Record. Retrieved 2013-07-011. 
  38. ^ "NJ TRANSIT & NY WATERWAY JOINT "DISCOUNTED" TICKET". The Star-Ledger (NY Waterway). Retrieved 2013-05-28. 
  39. ^ Frassinelli, Mike (May 31, 2012). "NJ Transit, NY Waterway collaborate for cheaper 'Surf and Turf' pass". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved 2013-05-28. 
  40. ^ Frassinelli, Mike (May 24, 2013). "Ferry commute sidesteps cramped Lincoln Tunnel, Port Authority Bus Terminal". The Star-Ledger. Retrieved 2013-05-28. 
  41. ^ '"Try Cruising Home Tonight" (Press release). New Jersey Transit. Retrieved 2013-05-28. 
  42. ^ Midtown Ferry Terminal
  43. ^ World Financial Center
  44. ^ Pier 11 Wall Street
  45. ^ Edgewater Landing Shuttle
  46. ^ NJT bus 23 schedule
  47. ^ NYWaterway/Blvd bus
  48. ^ http://www.nywaterway.com/UserFiles/Files/JFKBlvdEastBusSchedule.pdf Bus 123
  49. ^ NJT bus 156 schedule
  50. ^ NJT bus 156 schedule
  51. ^ NJT bus 158 schedule
  52. ^ NJT bus 158 schedule
  53. ^ a b NJT bus 159 schedule

External links[edit]