Washburn University

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Washburn University
Washburn University logo.png
Mottopurificatus non consumptus
purified, not consumed
Established1865
TypePublic
EndowmentUS$ 152 million[1]
PresidentJerry Farley
Academic staff550
Students7,303
Undergraduates6,446
LocationTopeka, Kansas, USA
39°02′02″N 95°41′56″W / 39.033786°N 95.698975°W / 39.033786; -95.698975Coordinates: 39°02′02″N 95°41′56″W / 39.033786°N 95.698975°W / 39.033786; -95.698975
CampusUrban, 160 acres (0.647 km²)
Colors     Blue
     White
AthleticsNCAA Division II
NicknameIchabods
MascotThe Ichabod
Websitewww.washburn.edu
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Washburn University
Washburn University logo.png
Mottopurificatus non consumptus
purified, not consumed
Established1865
TypePublic
EndowmentUS$ 152 million[1]
PresidentJerry Farley
Academic staff550
Students7,303
Undergraduates6,446
LocationTopeka, Kansas, USA
39°02′02″N 95°41′56″W / 39.033786°N 95.698975°W / 39.033786; -95.698975Coordinates: 39°02′02″N 95°41′56″W / 39.033786°N 95.698975°W / 39.033786; -95.698975
CampusUrban, 160 acres (0.647 km²)
Colors     Blue
     White
AthleticsNCAA Division II
NicknameIchabods
MascotThe Ichabod
Websitewww.washburn.edu

Washburn University (WU) is a co-educational, public institution of higher learning in Topeka, Kansas, USA. It offers undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as professional programs in law and business. Washburn has 550 faculty members, who teach more than 6,400 undergraduate students and nearly 1,000 graduate students. The university's assets include a $152 million endowment.

History[edit]

Washburn University was established in February 1865 as Lincoln College by a charter issued by the State of Kansas and the General Association of Congregational Ministers and Churches of Kansas on land donated by abolitionist John Ritchie. The school was renamed Washburn College in 1868 after Ichabod Washburn pledged $25,000 to the school. Washburn was a church deacon, abolitionist and industrialist who resided in Worcester, Massachusetts.[citation needed]

Washburn University’s mascot, The Ichabods, honors the school’s early benefactor, Ichabod Washburn. The original design of the studious-looking, tailcoat-clad figure was created in 1938 by Bradbury Thompson (B.A. ‘34), who became an internationally acclaimed graphic artist.[citation needed]

In 1913 the medical department of Washburn College closed. Previously the Kansas Medical School had become infamous on December 10, 1895, when it was discovered that some of the bodies used for anatomical study had been stolen from local cemeteries. As the news was being printed (eventually across the country) the governor called out state troops to protect the school in fear of a riot. Three of the doctors, including the Dean of the school, and a janitor/student from the school were arrested as well as one man not a member of the school. Charges against the doctors were discharged, the janitor was convicted but had his conviction reversed on appeal and the final man was convicted but later pardoned.[2]

During World War II, Washburn Municipal University was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.[3]

Formerly a municipal university, the university's primary funding was moved from city property tax to county sales tax sources in 1999, with the school retaining status as a municipal subdivision of the state.[citation needed] Washburn is governed by its own nine-member Board of Regents.[4]

Presidents[edit]

1. Horatio W. Butterfield (1869—1870)[5]
2. Peter McVicar (1871—1895)[5]
3. George M. Herrick (1896—1901)[5]
4. Norman Plass (1902—1908)[5]
5. Frank K. Sanders (1908—1914)[5]
6. Parley P. Womer (1915—1931)[5]
7. Philip C. King (1931—1941)[5]
8. Arthur G. Sellen (1941—1942)[5]
9. Bryan S. Stoffer (1942—1961)[5]
10. Harold E. Sponberg (1961—1965)[5]
11. John W. Henderson (1965—1980)[5]
12. John L. Green (1981—1988)[5]
13. John Duggan (1988)[5]
Interim John L. Burns (1988—1990)[5]
14. Hugh L. Thompson (1990—1997)[5]
15. Dr. Jerry Farley (1997—present)[5]

Academics[edit]

WU provides broadly-based liberal arts and professional education through more than 200 certificate, associate, baccalaureate, master’s and juris doctor programs through the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Law, Business, Nursing and Applied Studies. The university is home to several honor and recognition societies. The most prestigious societies are the Sagamore Society for men and NONOSO for women.[citation needed]

Rankings[edit]

Washburn University is consistently ranked among Midwestern universities as an independent public institution, rated 7th in the Midwest among public Master's level universities in 2010 by U.S. News and World Report. The University's endowment of $100M+ ranks it near the top among Master's degree institutions in endowment per student.[citation needed]

Law School[edit]

Formed in 1903[6] the Washburn School of Law was one of the first in the country to have a legal clinic where students are able to actively practice the legal profession. Today, it is in the minority of law schools to employ a full-time faculty for its law clinic.[who?] The Washburn School of Law had the highest pass rate of the Kansas State Bar Exam of any law school in the state of Kansas.[who?] The Washburn Law Library houses over 380,000 volumes and is the largest in the state.[7] It has been ranked as one of the top 20 law school libraries in the country.[8] Notable alumni include Bob Dole, Dennis Moore, Kim Phillips, Bill Kurtis and Fred Phelps.

Buildings[edit]

The main buildings of Washburn University are all dedicated to someone or of are important part in Washburn's history.[9]

Building nameFunction of building
Living Learning CenterHousing and dining
Memorial UnionConference rooms, Dining services, Ichabod Shop (Bookstore)
Stoffer Science HallDepartments of Biology, Chemistry, Computer Information Sciences, and Physics/Astronomy
Mabee LibraryLibrary, Washburn University Writing Center
Morgan HallDepartments of Mathematics, English, Communication, and Modern Languages
Student Recreation & Wellness CenterRecreation activities
Garvey Fine Arts CenterDepartments of Music, Theatre, Philosophy, and Religious Studies
Petro Allied Health CenterAthletics Department
Bradbury Thompson Alumni CenterAlumni Association
Bennett Computer CenterInformation Technology Department, computer labs
Carnegie HallDepartment of Education, Curriculum Resource Center, Deay Computer Lab
Art BuildingArt Department (painting, sculpting)
Carole ChapelOpen to public, classroom
International HouseInternational programs, and Study Abroad programs
Benton HallLeadership Institution, Center for Community Service, and School of Applied Studies
Henderson Learning Resources CenterSchool of Business, Departments of History, Mass Media, and Sociology
KTWU BuildingKTWU-TV, newspaper
Law School BuildingWashburn University School of Law
Foundation BuildingWashburn University Foundation

Athletics[edit]

The athletic teams are known as the Ichabods. Prior to the 2013–14 season, the women's athletic teams were known as the "Lady Blues". On May 24, 2013, President Farley announce that all athletic teams will be known as the Ichabods for the first time in history.[10] Washburn is a member of the Mid-America Intercollegiate Athletics Association and the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II.

Campus attractions[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Washburn University Annual Report retrieved on 2-3-2010
  2. ^ A Century of the Healing Arts 1850-1950 Shawnee County Historical society
  3. ^ "McDonald, Billy Ray "B.R."". The Dwight D. Eisenhower Foundation. 2000. Retrieved September 29, 2011. 
  4. ^ Board of Regents, Washburn University
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Presidents
  6. ^ Law School History
  7. ^ Washburn Law Library
  8. ^ Washburn Law Library Ranked
  9. ^ Washburn's Campus Map of Buildings
  10. ^ "Lady Blues" nickname dropped as of May 24, 2013

External links[edit]