Wampus cat

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The Wampus cat is a creature in American folklore, variously described as some kind of fearsome variation on a cougar.

Description[edit]

The wampus cat is often compared to the Ewah of Cherokee mythology, in that it was a woman who disguised herself in the skin of a cougar to spy on the men of the tribe, as they sat around the campfire with their wolf brothers, and told sacred stories on a hunting trip. When the woman was discovered, the tribe's medicine man punished her by transforming her into a half-woman, half-cat, who supposedly still haunts the forests of East Tennessee.[1] In folklore, it can be seen as one of a number of fearsome critters. In some sections of rural East Tennessee, the legend of the Wampus Cat takes on a more sinister tone. It is said that the Wampus Cat is a spirit of death and the earth, and when her cry is heard, it means someone is going to die and be buried within the next three days.

Mascot[edit]

The Wampus cat is the mascot of the following:

Other uses[edit]

A musical ensemble who recorded several tracks in 1937 and 1938, and consisting of six or seven string musicians including Oscar "Buddy" Woods, were billed as 'The Wampus Cats'.[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ S E Schlosser (2008-05-24). "The Wampus Cat: A Scary Story from Tennessee Folklore". Retrieved 2010-05-10. 
  2. ^ Clark Fork Junior/Senior High School website Legend written by lifelong Clark Fork resident Shirley Dawson Crawford
  3. ^ Owens, Judy (2008-06-20). "Reporters Looking for Stories, Finding Wampus Cats | Daily Yonder | Keep It Rural". Daily Yonder. Retrieved 2014-05-30. 
  4. ^ "Atoka Alumni Association - Home". Wampuscatalumni.com. Retrieved 2014-05-30. 
  5. ^ [1][dead link]
  6. ^ [2][dead link]
  7. ^ Uncle Dave Lewis. "Buddy Woods". Allmusic. Retrieved November 23, 2011. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]