Waldorf-Astoria Hotel

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Waldorf-Astoria
Waldorf Astoria Hotel.jpg
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is located in Manhattan
Location301 Park Avenue
New York City, New York
Coordinates40°45′24″N 73°58′27″W / 40.7566°N 73.97413°W / 40.7566; -73.97413Coordinates: 40°45′24″N 73°58′27″W / 40.7566°N 73.97413°W / 40.7566; -73.97413
Opening date1893 (Waldorf Hotel)
1897 (Astoria Hotel)
1931 (Waldorf-Astoria Hotel)
ArchitectSchultze & Weaver
Lee S Jablin, Harman Jablin Architects
ManagementWaldorf Astoria Hotels and Resorts
OwnerHilton Worldwide
Rooms1,508
RestaurantsPeacock Alley
Bull and Bear Steakhouse
Oscar's Brasserie
Floors47
Total height190.5 m (625 ft)
Websitewww.WaldorfNewYork.com
References: [1]2594[2][3]
 
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Waldorf-Astoria
Waldorf Astoria Hotel.jpg
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is located in Manhattan
Location301 Park Avenue
New York City, New York
Coordinates40°45′24″N 73°58′27″W / 40.7566°N 73.97413°W / 40.7566; -73.97413Coordinates: 40°45′24″N 73°58′27″W / 40.7566°N 73.97413°W / 40.7566; -73.97413
Opening date1893 (Waldorf Hotel)
1897 (Astoria Hotel)
1931 (Waldorf-Astoria Hotel)
ArchitectSchultze & Weaver
Lee S Jablin, Harman Jablin Architects
ManagementWaldorf Astoria Hotels and Resorts
OwnerHilton Worldwide
Rooms1,508
RestaurantsPeacock Alley
Bull and Bear Steakhouse
Oscar's Brasserie
Floors47
Total height190.5 m (625 ft)
Websitewww.WaldorfNewYork.com
References: [1]2594[2][3]

The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel is a luxury hotel in New York City. It has been housed in two historic landmark buildings in New York. The first, designed by architect Henry J. Hardenbergh, was on the Fifth Avenue site of the Empire State Building. The present building at 301 Park Avenue in Manhattan is a 47-story, 190.5 m (625 ft) Art Deco landmark, designed by architects Schultze and Weaver and dating from 1931. Lee S Jablin, Harman Jablin Architects, fully renovated and upgraded the historical property to its original grandeur during the mid-1980s through the mid-1990s. The Waldorf Astoria New York is a member of Hilton's Luxury and Lifestyle Brands along with Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts and Conrad Hotels & Resorts.

The Waldorf Astoria was the first hotel to offer room service, making a huge impact for the future of the hotel industry.

The hotel was branded as The Waldorf=Astoria, with a double hyphen, but originally a single hyphen was employed between "Waldorf" and "Astoria," as recalled by a popular expression and song, "Meet Me at the Hyphen." The equal sign was chosen to signify the equality between the Waldorf and Astor families. It also visually represents "Peacock Alley," the hallway between the two hotels that once stood where the Empire State building now stands today. This branding was discontinued shortly after its introduction.

The modern hotel has three American and classic European restaurants, and a beauty parlor located off the main lobby. Several boutiques surround the lobby. A boutique "hotel within a hotel" housed on the upper floors is known as The Waldorf Towers. The hotel has its own railway platform as part of Grand Central Terminal, used by Franklin D. Roosevelt, James Farley, Adlai Stevenson, and Douglas MacArthur, among others. An elevator large enough for Franklin D. Roosevelt's automobile provides access to the platform.[4]

Its name is ultimately derived from Walldorf in Germany and the prominent German-American Astor family that originated there.

Contents

History

The Waldorf-Astoria at the original location, demolished for the erection of the Empire State Building. Rendering by Joseph Pennell, ca. 1904-1908.
The hotel's name with the double hyphen on the awning over the Park Avenue entrance

An Astor family feud contributed to the events which led to the construction of the original Waldorf-Astoria on Fifth Avenue.

It started as two hotels: one owned by William Waldorf Astor, whose 13-story Waldorf Hotel was opened in 1893 and the other owned by his cousin, John Jacob Astor IV, called the Astoria Hotel and opened four years later in 1897, four stories higher.

William Astor, motivated in part by a dispute with his aunt, Caroline Webster Schermerhorn Astor, built the original Waldorf Hotel next door to her house, on the site of his father's mansion and today's Empire State Building. The hotel was built to the specifications of founding proprietor George Boldt; he and his wife Louise had become known as the owners and operators of the Bellevue, an elite boutique hotel in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Broad Street, subsequently expanded and renamed the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel. Boldt continued to own the Bellevue (and, later, the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel) even after his relationship with the Astors blossomed.

Engraved 1916 letterhead of the Bellevue-Stratford Hotel in Philadelphia including vignettes of that hotel as well as those of both the Waldorf and Astoria Hotels in New York all of which were then operating under the management of George Boldt.

William Astor's construction of a hotel next to his aunt's house worsened his feud with her, but, with Boldt's help, John Astor persuaded his mother to move uptown. John Astor then built the Astoria Hotel and leased it to Boldt. The hotels were initially built as two separate structures, but Boldt planned the Astoria so it could be connected to the Waldorf by Peacock Alley. The combined Waldorf-Astoria became the largest hotel in the world at the time, while maintaining the original Waldorf's high standards.[5]

Park Avenue foyer (in 1988)

The Waldorf Astoria is historically significant for transforming the contemporary hotel, then a facility for transients, into a social center of the city as well as a prestigious destination for visitors and a part of popular culture.[5] The Waldorf-Astoria was influential in advancing the status of women, who were admitted singly without escorts. Founding proprietor George C. Boldt became wealthy and prominent internationally, if not so much a popular celebrity as his famous employee, Oscar Tschirky, "Oscar of the Waldorf." Boldt built one of America's most ambitious houses, Boldt Castle, on one of the Thousand Islands. George Boldt's wife, Louise Kehrer Boldt, was influential in evolving the idea of the grand urban hotel as a social center, particularly in making it appealing to women as a venue for social events.

Elevator lobby of the Waldorf Astoria in New York City

When the new Waldorf Astoria skyscraper was built over air rights of the New York State Realty and Terminal Company on Park Avenue, a cast of well reputed furnishers and decorators was assembled to lend the new hotel a grand yet domestic atmosphere. Former Waldorf manager Lucius M. Boomer had retired to Florida after the original Waldorf-Astoria buildings were demolished, but he retained exclusive rights to the name, which he transferred to the new hotel. Boomer died in an airplane crash in 1947 and Conrad Hilton bought The Waldorf Astoria in 1949.[6]

Other Waldorf Astoria Hotels

In 2006, (tipu) Hilton Hotels announced plans to build a second Waldorf Astoria near Walt Disney World in Florida, and in 2007, plans were announced that another Waldorf Astoria would be built in Beverly Hills, where Santa Monica Boulevard and Wilshire Boulevard cross. A combination hotel and condominium Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and Residence Tower was announced by third parties to be developed for Hilton in Chicago, but has been canceled.[7]

a typical Elevator Indicator located the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City NY. This elevator was made by Otis

The Elysian Hotel in Chicago has been renamed the Waldorf Astoria Chicago.[8]

In November 2008, a referendum in Beverly Hills, California was voted on to determine whether developer Oasis West Realty LLC will be allowed to expand the nine-acre site of the Beverly Hilton Hotel, recently owned by the late Merv Griffin, at the intersection of Wilshire and Santa Monica boulevards. Expansion plans include removing some buildings and adding an 8-story condo, a Waldorf-Astoria named 12-story hotel, and another 18-story condo tower. The Beverly Hills City Council had approved the $500 million project by a 3-2 vote. Local resident opponents led by a group called Citizens Right to Decide Committee gathered enough signatures to place the referendum on the November 4, 2008, ballot with the argument "It's Just Too Big." Los Angeles County election officials reported a week after the vote that local Measure H was losing by 68 votes, with provisional ballots yet to be counted. On December 2, 2008, yes on H passed by 129 votes. Yes: 7972. No: 7834.

2012 will see the conversion of the Caledonian Hilton Edinburgh completed with the hotel becoming "The Caledonian - A Waldorf Astoria Hotel."

In 2013, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts will open new properties in Amsterdam, Berlin, Jerusalem and Panama.

Notable residents

Waldorf-Astoria Hotel and Park Avenue with Helmsley Building and Met Life Building in background

Notable events

In popular culture

A simple classic Waldorf Salad

See also

References

  1. ^ Waldorf-Astoria Hotel at Emporis
  2. ^ Waldorf-Astoria Hotel at SkyscraperPage
  3. ^ Waldorf-Astoria Hotel at Structurae
  4. ^ "Waldorf-Astoria's private rail platform forever closed". NewYorkology. 7 February 2006. http://www.newyorkology.com/archives/2006/02/waldorfastorias.php. Retrieved 25 February 2011.
  5. ^ a b c d "Guard shot during robbery attempt at Waldorf-Astoria". CNN. 2008-11-16. http://www.cnn.com/2008/CRIME/11/15/waldorf.shooting.ap/index.html?iref=mpstoryview.[dead link]
  6. ^ Stanley Turkel (1931). "A New Waldorf Against The Sky". Old and Sold. http://www.oldandsold.com/articles08/waldorf-astoria-17.shtml. Retrieved 26 February 2011.
  7. ^ http://skyscraperpage.com/cities/?buildingID=65855
  8. ^ http://waldorfastoria3.hilton.com/en/promotions/waldorfchicago.html
  9. ^ http://www.press.umich.edu/pdf/0472099302-ch10.pdf
  10. ^ Broad, William J. (May 4, 2009). "A Battle to Preserve a Visionary’s Bold Failure". New York Times.
  11. ^ http://marilynmonroecollection.com/TheWaldorfAstoriaInvoice.htm
  12. ^ "United States Mission to the United Nations" "Protocol supports the Permanent Representative and USUN Ambassadors by planning, managing and executing events at the Mission, the residence of the Permanent Representative at the Waldorf=Astoria Towers,..."
  13. ^ [1] Video - WalkAbout NY: Paris Hilton Returns to Her Roots. June 5, 2010. Retrieved June 7, 2010.
  14. ^ Reed, Paula (2012). Fifty Fashion Looks that Changed the 1960s. Design Museum, London: Hachette UK. ISBN 1840916176. http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=T4465PO6Ub8C&pg=PT25&dq=Kenneth+Battelle+Monroe&hl=en&redir_esc=y.
  15. ^ Wong, Aliza Z. (2010). Julie Willett. ed. The American beauty industry encyclopedia: Hairstylists, Celebrity. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood. pp. 151-154. ISBN 9780313359491. http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=CljLw4sH2DMC&pg=PA151&dq#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  16. ^ Collins, Amy Fine (1 June 2003). "It had to be Kenneth.(hairstylist Kenneth Battelle)(Interview)". Vanity Fair. http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-7037828_ITM. Retrieved 3 December 2012.
  17. ^ As quoted in "Owens pierced a myth" by Larry Schwartz in ESPN SportsCentury. (2005)
  18. ^ National Football Foundation. "Awards Dinner". www.footballfoundation.org. http://www.footballfoundation.org/eventDinner.php.
  19. ^ Hospitality Design, July/August 1994, "Presidential Suite, The Waldorf Towers, New York City", Susan Dorn, Pages 31-35.
  20. ^ "Senior Class of 2008 News: Prom Information". The Bronx High School of Science. http://www.bxscience.edu/apps/news/show_news.jsp?REC_ID=57476&id=14. Retrieved 2008-05-06.
  21. ^ Salamone, Gina (2008-05-28). "The $1,000 prom night: New Yorkers dropping average of $1K on big event". New York Daily News. http://www.nydailynews.com/lifestyle/2008/03/25/2008-03-25_the_1000_prom_night_new_yorkers_dropping.html?print=1&page=all. Retrieved 2008-05-06.
  22. ^ Russian Children's Welfare Society
  23. ^ NYU International Hospitality Industry Investment Conference, New York University.
  24. ^ AHN
  25. ^ James Barron, Dear Waldorf, Mummy Stole Your Teapot Back in 1935. So Sorry., New York Times, September 26, 2012
  26. ^ Leah A. Zeldes (7 October 2009). "Eat this! Waldorf Salad, A Apple-licious Fall Favorite". Dining Chicago. http://blog.diningchicago.com/2009/10/07/eat-this-waldorf-salad-an-apple-licious-fall-favorite/. Retrieved 22 February 2011.
  27. ^ About.com
  28. ^ New York Holidays
  29. ^ The Big Sea: An Autobiography by Langston Hughes.

External links