Wait Till Your Father Gets Home

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Wait Till Your Father Gets Home
GenreAnimated sitcom,Adult animation
Voices ofTom Bosley
Joan Gerber
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes48 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)William Hanna
Joseph Barbera
Running time22 minutes
Production company(s)Hanna-Barbera
Broadcast
Original channelSyndication
Original run1972 – 1974
 
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Wait Till Your Father Gets Home
GenreAnimated sitcom,Adult animation
Voices ofTom Bosley
Joan Gerber
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons3
No. of episodes48 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)William Hanna
Joseph Barbera
Running time22 minutes
Production company(s)Hanna-Barbera
Broadcast
Original channelSyndication
Original run1972 – 1974

Wait Till Your Father Gets Home is an animated sitcom produced by Hanna-Barbera that aired in first-run syndication in the United States from 1972 to 1974 (airing on most NBC stations on Sunday nights at 10:30, except for the ones who had moved their late-night news to that slot). The show originated in a one-time segment on Love, American Style called "Love and the Old-Fashioned Father." The same pilot was later produced with a live cast (starring Van Johnson), but with no success.

The show was the first primetime animated sitcom to run for more than a single season since The Flintstones more than 10 years earlier and would be the only one until The Simpsons 15 years later. The show was inspired by All in the Family.[1]

Premise[edit]

The 48 episodes feature Tom Bosley as Harry Boyle, a long-suffering suburban everyman dad and restaurant equipment dealer. The Boyle family consists of father Harry; wife Irma (voiced by Joan Gerber); teenage feminist daughter Alice who is overweight but usually okay with her figure rather than trying to lose weight; lazy and perpetually unemployed long-haired young adult son Chet; and precocious, if rather mercenary, younger son Jamie. Harry often bickers with the more liberal Alice and Chet over various social issues of the day, with Irma endeavoring to remain neutral while Jamie is more sympathetic to his father's beliefs. Despite it all, Harry loves his family, and usually tries to support them.

Despite Harry's conservatism, it pales against his neighbor Ralph Kane, who is a John Birch-like ultra-right-winger who is fanatically anti-communist and obsessed with every absurd conspiracy theory. Following Ralph with his cause is senior citizen Sara Whittaker, whom he addresses as "Sergeant". They have both turned one end of the block into, basically, an armed camp. Although Harry considers Ralph a close friend, he is annoyed at Ralph's extreme attitudes and rarely hesitates to dispute his opinions or preempt his more threatening ambitions.

Many of the stories revolve around the generation gap between Harry and his children, in which the series' sympathy is typically on his side, leading the character to usually win his arguments. During the 1972-73 season, the DePatie-Freleng studio had an animated Saturday morning series called The Barkleys with a very similar family, only they were all dogs. Joan Gerber was also the voice of the "mom" on that show, Agnes. The Barkleys had married couple Arnie and Agnes, teenage kids Terry and Roger, and pre-teen Chester.

Like many animated series created by Hanna-Barbera in the 1970s, the show contained a laugh track created by the studio.[2] For this show, the studio added a third belly laugh to add a little more "variety" (the only TV series made by Hanna-Barbera to have this added laugh). In addition, the laugh track was also slowed considerably.[2]

Voice cast[edit]

Guest stars[edit]

Other "guests" on the series included thinly disguised versions of celebrities who did not provide their own voices, such as guru Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. When a crooked car dealer on another episode was perceived by real-life Los Angeles-area car salesman Cal Worthington as being a send-up of him, he sued the studio (Hanna-Barbera), the sponsors (Chevrolet) and the five NBC-owned stations that carried the show Sundays at 10.30 p.m. EST.[3]

Credits[edit]

DVD release[edit]

On June 5, 2007 Warner Home Video released Season 1 of Wait Till Your Father Gets Home on DVD in Region 1 for the H-B classics collection. Warner Bros. still has yet to release the remaining 24 episodes from seasons two and three on an upcoming DVD set.

DVD NameEp #Release Date
Season 124June 5, 2007

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ TV Guide: Wait Till Your Father Gets Home
  2. ^ a b Iverson, Paul: "The Advent of the Laugh Track" Hofstra University archives; February 1994
  3. ^ Erickson, Syndicated Television, McFarland, 1988

External links[edit]