Waddy Thompson, Jr.

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Waddy Thompson, Jr.
Waddy Thompson Jr.svg
United States Minister to Mexico
In office
February 10, 1842 – March 9, 1844
Appointed byJohn Tyler
Preceded byHenry E. Lawrence (as Special Diplomatic Agent)
Succeeded byMoses Yale Beach (as Special Diplomatic Agent)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 6th district
In office
September 10, 1835 – March 3, 1841
Preceded byWarren R. Davis
Succeeded byWilliam Butler
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives
In office
1826 – 1829
Personal details
Born(1798-01-08)January 8, 1798
Pickensville, Ninety-Six District, South Carolina
DiedNovember 23, 1868(1868-11-23) (aged 70)
Tallahassee, Florida
Resting placeTallahassee, Florida
Political partyAnti-Jacksonian (1835 – 1837)
Whig (1837 – onward)
Professionattorney, judge, diplomat
Signature
Military service
Service/branchSouth Carolina State Militia
Years of service1832
Rankbrigadier general
 
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Waddy Thompson, Jr.
Waddy Thompson Jr.svg
United States Minister to Mexico
In office
February 10, 1842 – March 9, 1844
Appointed byJohn Tyler
Preceded byHenry E. Lawrence (as Special Diplomatic Agent)
Succeeded byMoses Yale Beach (as Special Diplomatic Agent)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 6th district
In office
September 10, 1835 – March 3, 1841
Preceded byWarren R. Davis
Succeeded byWilliam Butler
Member of the South Carolina House of Representatives
In office
1826 – 1829
Personal details
Born(1798-01-08)January 8, 1798
Pickensville, Ninety-Six District, South Carolina
DiedNovember 23, 1868(1868-11-23) (aged 70)
Tallahassee, Florida
Resting placeTallahassee, Florida
Political partyAnti-Jacksonian (1835 – 1837)
Whig (1837 – onward)
Professionattorney, judge, diplomat
Signature
Military service
Service/branchSouth Carolina State Militia
Years of service1832
Rankbrigadier general

Waddy Thompson, Jr. (January 8, 1798 - November 23, 1868) was a U.S. Representative from South Carolina.

Born in Pickensville (now in Pickens County), Ninety-Six District, South Carolina. Thompson moved to Greenville with his parents in his infancy. He received his early education in neighboring schools, and was graduated from South Carolina College in 1814.

He studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1819, beginning practice in Edgefield, South Carolina. He moved to Greenville, South Carolina, and continued the practice of law. He served as member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1826 to 1829. Thompson was elected solicitor of the western circuit in 1830.

He was appointed brigadier general of militia in 1832.

Thompson was elected as an Anti-Jacksonian to the 24th United States Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Warren R. Davis. He was reelected as a Whig to the 25th and 26th Congresses and served from September 10, 1835, to March 3, 1841.

He served as chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs (26th Congress). He was not a candidate for renomination in 1840.

He was appointed Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary to Mexico and served from February 10, 1842, to March 9, 1844.

He moved to Madison, Florida, and engaged in cotton planting. He was appointed solicitor general of a circuit in 1868.

He died while on a visit to Tallahassee, Florida, November 23, 1868 and interred in St. John's Episcopal Church Cemetery in Tallahassee.

Source[edit]

Further reading[edit]

William Lee Miller (1996), Arguing about Slavery: The Great Battle in the United States Congress, New York: Knopf.

External links[edit]

Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Henry E. Lawrence (as Special Diplomatic Agent)
United States Minister to Mexico
1842 – 1844
Succeeded by
Moses Yale Beach (as Special Diplomatic Agent)
Political offices
Preceded by
Warren R. Davis
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from South Carolina's 6th congressional district

1835 – 1841
Succeeded by
William Butler