Volkswagen Lupo

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Volkswagen Lupo
Vw lupo v sst.jpg
Overview
ManufacturerVolkswagen
Production1998–2005
AssemblyWolfsburg, Germany[nb 1]
Brussels, Belgium[nb 2]
Body and chassis
ClassCity car
Body style3-door hatchback
LayoutFront-engine, front-wheel-drive
PlatformVolkswagen Group A00 platform
RelatedSEAT Arosa
Powertrain
Engine1.0 L I4 (petrol)
1.4 L I4 (petrol)
1.6 L I4 (petrol)
1.2 L I3 (diesel)
1.4 L I3 (diesel)
1.7 L I4 (diesel)
Transmission5-speed manual
6-speed manual
5-speed semi-automatic
4-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase2,318 mm (91.3 in)
Length3,524 mm (138.7 in)
Width1,640 mm (64.6 in)
Height1,457 mm (57.4 in)
Curb weight975 kg (2,150 lb)
Chronology
SuccessorVolkswagen Fox
 
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Volkswagen Lupo
Vw lupo v sst.jpg
Overview
ManufacturerVolkswagen
Production1998–2005
AssemblyWolfsburg, Germany[nb 1]
Brussels, Belgium[nb 2]
Body and chassis
ClassCity car
Body style3-door hatchback
LayoutFront-engine, front-wheel-drive
PlatformVolkswagen Group A00 platform
RelatedSEAT Arosa
Powertrain
Engine1.0 L I4 (petrol)
1.4 L I4 (petrol)
1.6 L I4 (petrol)
1.2 L I3 (diesel)
1.4 L I3 (diesel)
1.7 L I4 (diesel)
Transmission5-speed manual
6-speed manual
5-speed semi-automatic
4-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase2,318 mm (91.3 in)
Length3,524 mm (138.7 in)
Width1,640 mm (64.6 in)
Height1,457 mm (57.4 in)
Curb weight975 kg (2,150 lb)
Chronology
SuccessorVolkswagen Fox

The Volkswagen Lupo was a city car produced by the German manufacturer Volkswagen from 1998 to 2005.

Model history[edit]

The Lupo was introduced in 1998 to fill a gap at the bottom of the Volkswagen model range caused by the increasing size and weight of the Polo. The 1998 Lupo was a badge-engineered version of the stablemate 1997 SEAT Arosa. Both use the A00 platform which is a shortened version of the Polo/Ibiza A0 platform. Initially only available in two trim variants, the budget E trim and the upgraded S trim; the range later expanded to include a Sport and GTI variant. Petrol engines ranged from 1.0 to 1.4 (1.6 for the GTI) with diesels from 1.2 to 1.7. The differences between the E and S trim included painted door mirrors, door handles and strip, central locking, electric windows, double folding seats and opening rear windows.

Production of the Lupo discontinued in 2005, and was replaced by the Fox.

The Lupo name is Italian, meaning wolf, and is named after its home town of Wolfsburg.[1]

Specifications[edit]

Engines[edit]

NameVolumeTypeOutputTorque0–100 km/hTop speedYears
Petrol engines
1.0 8v997 cc (1 L; 61 cu in)4 cyl.50 PS (37 kW; 49 hp) at 5000 rpm84 N·m (62 lb·ft) at 2750 rpm18.0 s152 km/h (94 mph)1998–2000
1.0 8v999 cc (1 L; 61 cu in)4 cyl50 PS (37 kW; 49 hp) at 5000 rpm86 N·m (63 lb·ft) at 3000–3600 rpm17.7 s152 km/h (94 mph)1998–2005
1.4 8v1,390 cc (1 L; 85 cu in)4 cyl.60 PS (44 kW; 59 hp) at 4700 rpm116 N·m (86 lb·ft) at 3000 rpm14.3 s168 km/h (104 mph)2000–2005
1.4 16v1,390 cc (1 L; 85 cu in)4 cyl.75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 5000 rpm126 N·m (93 lb·ft) at 3800 rpm12.0 s172 km/h (107 mph)1998–2005
1.4 16v Sport1,390 cc (1 L; 85 cu in)4 cyl.100 PS (74 kW; 99 hp) at 6000 rpm126 N·m (93 lb·ft) at 4400 rpm10.0 s188 km/h (117 mph)1999–2005
1.4 16v FSI1,390 cc (1 L; 85 cu in)4 cyl.105 PS (77 kW; 104 hp) at 6200 rpm130 N·m (96 lb·ft) at 4250 rpm11.8 s199 km/h (124 mph)2000–2003
1.6 16v GTI1,598 cc (2 L; 98 cu in)4 cyl.125 PS (92 kW; 123 hp) at 6500 rpm152 N·m (112 lb·ft) at 3000 rpm7.8 s202 km/h (126 mph)2000–2005
Diesel engines
1.2 TDI 3L1,191 cc (1 L; 73 cu in)3 cyl.61 PS (45 kW; 60 hp) at 4000 rpm140 N·m (103 lb·ft) at 1800–2400 rpm14.5 s165 km/h (103 mph)1999–2005
1.4 TDI1,422 cc (1 L; 87 cu in)3 cyl.75 PS (55 kW; 74 hp) at 4000 rpm195 N·m (144 lb·ft) at 2200 rpm12.3 s170 km/h (106 mph)1999–2005
1.7 SDI1,716 cc (2 L; 105 cu in)4 cyl.60 PS (44 kW; 59 hp) at 4200 rpm115 N·m (85 lb·ft) at 2200–3000 rpm16.8 s157 km/h (98 mph)1998–2005

Versions[edit]

Lupo 3L[edit]

Volkswagen Lupo 3L

The Lupo 3L was a special-edition made with the intent of being the world's first car in series production consuming as little as 3 litres of fuel per 100 kilometres (78 miles per US gallon or 94 miles per Imperial gallon). To achieve this the 3L was significantly changed from the standard Lupo to include:

The 3L, along with the GTI and FSI, had a completely different steel body to other Lupos, using thinner but stronger steel sheet. The car had an automated electro-hydraulic manual transmission with a Tiptronic mode on the selector and an automated electro-hydraulic clutch. The car also had an ECO mode. When engaged it limited the power to 41 bhp (31 kW; 42 PS) (excluding kick down) and programmed the transmission to change up at the most economical point. ECO mode also activated the start/stop function, a feature that was new to European cars at the time. To restart, the driver simply takes his foot off the brake and presses the accelerator. In ECO mode, the clutch was disengaged when the accelerator pedal was released for maximum economy, so the car freewheels as much as possible, with the clutch re-engaging as soon as the accelerator pedal or brake pedal is touched. The 3L also has only 4 wheel bolts and alloy brake drums at the rear, along with many aluminum suspension components.

Initially, there were very few options on the 3L, as options added weight which affected fuel consumption. Those available initially were electrically heated and electrically controlled mirrors, fog lights and different paint colours. In order to increase sales, other options were offered including all-electric steering, electric windows and air conditioning. These options however, increased fuel consumption slightly. In 2001, a Japanese economy driver, Dr Miyano, used it to set a new world record for the most frugal circumnavigation of Britain in a standard diesel production car, with an average fuel economy figure of 119.48 mpg. In November 2003, Gerhard Plattner covered a distance of 2,910 miles through 20 European countries in a standard Lupo 3L TDI. He achieved his aim of completing this journey - which started in Oslo, Norway and finished in The Hague in The Netherlands - with just 100 euros worth of fuel. In fact, all he required was 90.94 euros, which corresponds to an average consumption of 2.78 litres per 100 km (101.6 mpg).

According to the Lupo 3L instruction manual, the 3L engine also runs on Rapeseed Methyl Ester (RME) without any changes to the engine.

During the period of series production of the Lupo 3L, Volkswagen also presented the 1L Concept, a prototype made with the objective of proving the capability of producing a roadworthy vehicle consuming only 1 litre of fuel per 100 kilometres (235 miles per US gallon).

The Lupo 3L shared its engine and special gearbox with the Audi A2 1.2 TDI 3L. As a result of this and other changes, this Audi A2 is also capable of reaching the same results as the Lupo 3L.

Lupo FSI[edit]

The Lupo FSI was a 5L/100 km petrol version of the Lupo 3L. It had a similar automated gearbox to the 3L but with different gear ratios. Outwardly it was almost identical to a 3L but with a more standard front grill and lacked the magnesium steering wheel of the 3L. The FSI was only sold in Germany and Austria.

Lupo GTI[edit]

Volkswagen Lupo GTI

The 1.6 L Lupo GTI has been labelled a true successor to the Volkswagen Golf Mk1, one of the first true hot hatches.[citation needed] The GTI can be identified by its fully body-coloured bumpers and twin central exhausts. In 2002, a six-speed gearbox was added, together with improved throttle response, and was suggested as a competitor to the Mini Cooper or the larger Volkswagen Polo GTI.[2] The GTI features much more standard equipment which was not available on any other in the Lupo range, including bi-xenon headlights, 15-inch Bathurst alloy wheels and an off black interior.

With a DOHC 16-valve four-cylinder engine producing 125 PS (123 hp), the GTI had a top speed of 127 mph (204 km/h) and could accelerate 0-60 mph in 7.8 seconds.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Between 1998 and 2005; from 2001, the 3L, GTI models only.
  2. ^ Between 2001 and 2005; except 3L, GTI models.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Auto Express February 2003". Autoexpress.co.uk. 2003-02-04. Retrieved 2011-09-05. 
  2. ^ "Evo March 2002". Evo.co.uk. 2002-03-07. Retrieved 2011-09-05. 

External links[edit]