Vancouver International Airport

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Vancouver International Airport
Yvr logo.svg
Vancouver International Airport Aerial.JPG
IATA: YVRICAO: CYVR
WMO: 71892
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerTransport Canada
OperatorVancouver Airport Authority
ServesMetro Vancouver
LocationRichmond, British Columbia, Canada
Hub for
Elevation AMSL14 ft / 4 m
Coordinates49°11′41″N 123°11′02″W / 49.19472°N 123.18389°W / 49.19472; -123.18389Coordinates: 49°11′41″N 123°11′02″W / 49.19472°N 123.18389°W / 49.19472; -123.18389
Websitewww.yvr.ca
Map
CYVR is located in Vancouver
CYVR
Location in Vancouver
Runways
DirectionLengthSurface
ftm
08L/26R9,9403,030Concrete
08R/26L11,5003,505Asphalt/Concrete
12/307,3002,225Asphalt/Concrete
Helipads
NumberLengthSurface
ftm
AUnmarked arrival/departure hover area
B7924Asphalt
C11034Concrete
Statistics (2011)
Aircraft movements296,942
Number of passengers17,032,742
Sources: Canada Flight Supplement[1]
Environment Canada[2]
Movements from Vancouver Airport Authority[3]
Passenger statistics from Vancouver Airport Authority.[3]
 
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Vancouver International Airport
Yvr logo.svg
Vancouver International Airport Aerial.JPG
IATA: YVRICAO: CYVR
WMO: 71892
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerTransport Canada
OperatorVancouver Airport Authority
ServesMetro Vancouver
LocationRichmond, British Columbia, Canada
Hub for
Elevation AMSL14 ft / 4 m
Coordinates49°11′41″N 123°11′02″W / 49.19472°N 123.18389°W / 49.19472; -123.18389Coordinates: 49°11′41″N 123°11′02″W / 49.19472°N 123.18389°W / 49.19472; -123.18389
Websitewww.yvr.ca
Map
CYVR is located in Vancouver
CYVR
Location in Vancouver
Runways
DirectionLengthSurface
ftm
08L/26R9,9403,030Concrete
08R/26L11,5003,505Asphalt/Concrete
12/307,3002,225Asphalt/Concrete
Helipads
NumberLengthSurface
ftm
AUnmarked arrival/departure hover area
B7924Asphalt
C11034Concrete
Statistics (2011)
Aircraft movements296,942
Number of passengers17,032,742
Sources: Canada Flight Supplement[1]
Environment Canada[2]
Movements from Vancouver Airport Authority[3]
Passenger statistics from Vancouver Airport Authority.[3]

Vancouver International Airport (IATA: YVRICAO: CYVR) is located on Sea Island in Richmond, British Columbia, Canada, about 12 km (7.5 mi) from Downtown Vancouver. In 2011 it was the second busiest airport in Canada by aircraft movements (296,942[3]) and passengers (17.0 million[3]), behind Toronto Pearson International Airport, with non-stop flights daily to Asia, Europe, Oceania, the United States, and Mexico, and other airports within Canada. The airport has won several notable international best airport awards; it won the Skytrax Best North American Airport award in 2010, 2011, and 2012 the second, third and fourth time respectively it has received the honour (the first was in 2007).[4][5][6] YVR also retains the distinction of Best Canadian Airport in the regional results.[7] It is a hub for Air Canada, Air Canada Express and Air Transat as well as a focus city for WestJet. Vancouver International Airport is one of eight Canadian airports that have US Border Preclearance facilities. Vancouver International Airport (YVR) has been named, "The Best Airport in North America".[8] The airport also made the list of top 10 airports in the world for the first time in 2012. It is also one of the few big international airports to have a terminal for scheduled floatplanes.

Vancouver International Airport is owned by Transport Canada[9] and is managed by Vancouver Airport Authority,[10] which also manages other airports around the world through its Vancouver Airport Services subsidiary.

Contents

History

In 1927, Charles Lindbergh refused to include Vancouver in his North American tour because of the lack of a proper airport. Two years later, the city purchased land on Sea Island for aviation purposes, replacing the original grass airstrip at Minoru Park. During World War II the airports and its original terminal, now the South Terminal, would be leased to the Federal government, and operated by the Department of National Defence and the Department of Transport. The airport was a base for Royal Canadian Air Force training, the crews and their families housed in a new townsite on the island, named Burkeville after Boeing president Stanley Burke. Funds from the lease were used to purchase additional land for new hangars and a production plant for Boeing Aircraft of Canada.[11]

The present main terminal was completed in 1968, and has since been expanded to include separate domestic and international terminals. A north runway was completed in 1996.

In 2011 the airport announced that it will enact a program aiming to encourage airlines to start more flights between Vancouver and Asia.[12]

Gateway

Due to its proximity to Asia in relation to the rest of Canada, YVR is the major gateway between Canada and Asia. It has more transpacific flights than any other airport in Canada. The sizable number of Asian Canadians living in Metro Vancouver contributes to the large number of flights as well.

On March 1, 2010 the day after the conclusion of the 2010 Winter Olympics, YVR was expected to set a record for daily traffic, with an estimated increase of 39,000 departing passengers, in addition to the 2009 daily average of 22,000 arrivals.

Terminals

Vancouver International Airport has three terminals:

  • the Domestic Terminal, which was constructed in 1968 and recently given a top-to-bottom renovation
  • the International Terminal, which includes a US Preclearance Annex for US-bound flights
  • the South Terminal, which is a portion of the original terminal that is still in use. This is considered to include the floatplane terminal.

The International and Domestic terminals could be considered to be one very large building divided into two sections, while the South terminal is located in a remote part of the airport. The South Terminal serves regional airlines which fly mostly within British Columbia. The International Terminal serves international destinations, with most US-bound flights utilising the US Border Preclearance facilities in the International Terminal.

The South Terminal houses the corporate headquarters of Pacific Coastal Airlines.[13]

YVR is one of eight Canadian airports that has United States border preclearance facilities. The International terminal utilizes glass partitions to physically separate US-bound passengers from others from customs through to boarding. As a result, not all airport retail shops are available to all passengers.

Free high speed Wi-Fi internet access is available in the International and Domestic Terminals.


Architecture

Vancouver International Airport's interior has a uniquely British Columbian theme, featuring one of the most extensive collections of Pacific Northwest Coast Native art in the world, and blues and greens to reflect the colours of the land, sea and sky. The airport uses a great deal of carpet and vast expanses of glass to let in large amounts of natural light. One of the most noticeable places for an arriving passenger is the International arrivals hall, a large area where customs and immigration procedures are completed. Arriving passengers come down escalators leading to a platform across a large waterfall. The YVR aboriginal art collection includes wooden sculptures and totem poles. Bill Reid's sculpture in bronze, "The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, The Jade Canoe", is displayed in the international departures area. The Institute for stained glass in Canada has documented the stained glass at Vancouver International Airport.[14]

Airlines and destinations

Air Canada domestic check-in facilities at the Domestic Terminal.
Much of the official signage in the terminal buildings is trilingual (English, French, and Chinese).
International arrivals hall
US Preclearance Annexe of the International Terminal's check-in hall.
A Canadian Aboriginal wood sculpture, located on the first floor of the domestic terminal.
The Spirit of Haida Gwaii, the Jade Canoe, located on the International departure level
Cathay Pacific Cargo plane taking off on a snowy day
Aerial shot showing Georgia Strait near airport

Scheduled airlines and destinations

AirlinesDestinationsTerminal
Air BerlinSeasonal: DüsseldorfInternational
Air CanadaCalgary, Edmonton, Montréal-Trudeau, Ottawa, Toronto-Pearson, Winnipeg
Seasonal: Kelowna, Whitehorse
Domestic
Air CanadaBeijing-Capital, Hong Kong, Honolulu, Kahului, Las Vegas, London-Heathrow, Los Angeles, Mexico City, Newark, San Francisco, Seoul-Incheon, Shanghai-Pudong, Sydney (Australia), Tokyo-Narita
Seasonal: Anchorage, Kailua-Kona, San Diego, San José del Cabo
International
Air Canada Express operated by Jazz AirCastlegar, Cranbrook, Fort McMurray, Fort St. John, Kamloops, Kelowna, Nanaimo, Penticton, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Regina, Sandspit, Saskatoon, Smithers, Terrace, Victoria, Whitehorse
Seasonal: Calgary
Domestic
Air Canada Express operated by Jazz AirPortland (OR), Seattle/TacomaInternational
Air ChinaBeijing-CapitalInternational
Air New ZealandAucklandInternational
Air NorthWhitehorseDomestic
Alaska AirlinesLos AngelesInternational
Alaska Airlines operated by Horizon AirPortland (OR), Seattle/TacomaInternational
American AirlinesDallas/Fort WorthInternational
British AirwaysLondon-HeathrowInternational
Cathay PacificHong Kong, New York-JFKInternational
Central Mountain AirCampbell River, Comox, Dawson Creek, Quesnel, Williams LakeDomestic
China AirlinesTaipei-TaoyuanInternational
China Eastern AirlinesShanghai-PudongInternational
China Southern AirlinesGuangzhouInternational
Delta Air LinesNew York-JFK [begins June 6, 2013]
Seasonal: Atlanta, Detroit, Minneapolis/St Paul, Salt Lake City
International
Delta Connection operated by Compass AirlinesMinneapolis/St. PaulInternational
Delta Connection operated by SkyWest AirlinesSalt Lake CityInternational
EVA AirTaipei-TaoyuanInternational
First AirSeasonal: Edmonton, YellowknifeSouth
Flair AirlinesKelowna, Comox, Fort Nelson, VictoriaSouth
Harbour AirGanges Harbour, Galiano Island, Miners Bay, Saturna Island, Bedwell Harbour, Victoria/Inner Harbour, NanaimoSouth
HawkairPrince Rupert, Smithers, TerraceDomestic
HeliJetVictoria/Inner HarbourSouth
Island Express AirNanaimo, AbbotsfordSouth
Japan AirlinesTokyo-NaritaInternational
Kelowna Flightcraft Air CharterMasset, Sandspit, KelownaSouth
KD AirQualicum Beach, Gilles Bay/Texada IslandSouth
KLMAmsterdamInternational
Korean AirSeoul-IncheonInternational
LufthansaFrankfurtInternational
Northern Thunderbird AirSmithers, Mackenzie, Prince GeorgeSouth
Orca AirwaysQualicum Beach, Tofino, VictoriaSouth
Pacific Coastal AirlinesAnahim Lake, Bella Coola, Calgary, Campbell River, Comox, Cranbrook, Masset, Port Hardy, Powell River, Trail, Victoria, Williams LakeSouth
Pat Bay AirVictoria/Inner Harbour, Victoria, Cowichan Bay and other parts of Vancouver IslandSouth
Philippine AirlinesLas Vegas [ends January 15, 2013],[15] ManilaInternational
Salt Spring AirGanges Harbour, Maple Bay, VictoriaSouth
San Juan AirlinesAnacortes, Bellingham, Seattle-Boeing Field/King County Airport, Friday HarborSouth
Seair Seaplanes[16]Ganges Harbour, Galiano Island, Miners Bay, Saturna Island, Port Washington, Thetis Island, Nanaimo, Sechelt, Bedwell HarbourSouth
Sichuan AirlinesChengdu, Shenyang[17]International
Tofino AirGabriola Island, SecheltSouth
United AirlinesChicago-O'Hare, Denver, Houston-Intercontinental, San Francisco
Seasonal: Newark
International
United Express operated by SkyWest AirlinesDenver, Los Angeles, San FranciscoInternational
US AirwaysPhoenixInternational
US Airways Express operated by Mesa AirlinesPhoenixInternational
Virgin AtlanticSeasonal: London-HeathrowInternational
West Coast AirNanaimo, Sechelt, Victoria/Inner HarbourSouth
WestJetCalgary, Edmonton, Kelowna, Montréal-Trudeau, Ottawa, Prince George, Toronto-Pearson, Winnipeg, Whitehorse
Seasonal: Regina, Saskatoon
Domestic
WestJetCancún, Chicago-O'Hare, Honolulu, Kahului, Kailua-Kona, Las Vegas, Lihue, Los Angeles, Orange County, Puerto Vallarta, San José del Cabo
Seasonal: Mazatlán, Palm Springs, Phoenix, San Francisco
International
Whistler Air[18]Whistler/Green LakeSouth

Charter airlines and destinations

AirlinesDestinationsTerminal
Air NorthSeasonal: Masset, Sandspit, KelownaSouth
Air TransatSeasonal: Amsterdam, Cancún, Frankfurt, Glasgow-International, London-Gatwick, Manchester, Manzanillo, Paris-Charles de Gaulle, Puerto Vallarta, San José del CaboInternational
Canadian NorthSeasonal: Kelowna, Kamloops, D.N.D. Cadet FlightsSouth
CanJetSeasonal: Cancún, Los Cabos, Puerto VallartaInternational
Condor FlugdienstSeasonal: FrankfurtInternational
Edelweiss AirSeasonal: Zurich[19]International
Miami Air InternationalSeasonal: Anchorage, Nome, MiamiInternational
Sunwing AirlinesSeasonal: Toronto-PearsonDomestic
Sunwing AirlinesCancún, Puerto Vallarta
Seasonal: Huatulco, Los Cabos, Mazatlán, Varadero
International

Cargo

AirlinesDestinations
Antonov AirlinesKiev-Boryspil
Cargojet AirwaysCalgary, Hamilton, Montréal, Winnipeg
Cathay Pacific CargoAnchorage, Hong Kong, Los Angeles
China Southern Airlines CargoLos Angeles, Shanghai-Pudong
DHL Express operated by ABX AirCincinnati/Northern Kentucky, Seattle-Boeing
DHL Express operated by Airpac Airlines[20]Seattle-Boeing
EVA Air CargoAnchorage, Taipei-Taoyuan
FedEx ExpressMemphis
FedEx Feeder operated by Empire AirlinesSeattle, Oakland
FedEx Feeder operated by Morningstar Air ExpressVictoria, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Toronto-Pearson
Purolator Courier operated by Kelowna Flightcraft Air CharterVictoria, Kelowna, Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Hamilton
UPS AirlinesLouisville, Seattle-Boeing
Volga-Dnepr

Green Coat Ambassadors

Vancouver Airport Authority was one of the first airports in North America to institute a volunteer program in 1989.[21] Volunteers in green vest/jacket are deployed around the airport to provide information, customer service and be the 'eyes and ears' for the various partners in the airport community between the hours of 6 am to 10 pm everyday.[22] Volunteers are given basic training in airport operations and undertake many of the similar trainings mandated to airport employees. Each volunteer is required to obtain Transportation Security Clearance and Restricted Area Identification Card for the purposes of accessing the restricted and sterile areas of the terminal.

Cost

In May 2005, the federal government, which owns the land, announced it was cutting rent costs by 54%. The rent reductions will cut the cost of the lease by approximately $840 million CAD between 2006–2020, or $5.0 billion CAD over the term of the lease, which ends in 2052. Currently, the airport authority pays about $80 million CAD each year in rent.

Passengers traveling through YVR are no longer required to pay a separate Airport Improvement Fee; it now is included in the price of a ticket.

Public transit connections

Rapid transit

Construction of the Skytrain Canada Line .

The international and domestic terminals are served by YVR–Airport Station, a terminus station of the Canada Line. A link building ($117 million, completed in 2007) links the international terminal with the domestic terminal, and serves as the arrival and departure area for users of the Canada Line. The Canada Line, one of three existing lines of Metro Vancouver's SkyTrain rapid transit network, opened in August 2009, in advance of the 2010 Winter Olympics in the following February. Vancouver's airport is the only one in Canada with a rail rapid transit connection. Vancouver International Airport contributed $300 million to the Canada Line construction.

Bus

Late at night and during Canada Line service interruptions, the N10 night bus connects the airport's international and domestic terminals to Richmond and downtown Vancouver. The airport's south terminal is served by the C92 bus, which connects to the Canada Line at Bridgeport Station.

Future expansion

YVR recently completed a $1.4-billion, multi-year capital development plan, which included a four-gate expansion to the International Terminal Wing, completed in June 2007. Two of the four new gates are conventional wide-bodied gates, and two are able to accommodate the Airbus A380. The international terminal addition has several examples of beauty in British Columbia, including a stream in a pathway and fish and jellyfish tanks.

Also recently completed was a five-gate and food and retail expansion in the Domestic Terminal's C-Pier, completed in 2009, and the Canada Line rapid transit link between YVR, Richmond and downtown Vancouver, which opened in August 2009.

Vancouver International Airport Authority has developed a 2007-2027 Master Plan and Land Use Plan, a look forward 20 years to ensure YVR will be able to accommodate the passengers it expects. It is asking the community for input and toured local malls with an informational display to elicit feedback. The tour is complete, but the public can still provide feedback through the Master Plan section of the YVR website, where a copy of the draft Master Plan recommendations is also available.[23]

Operation Yellow Ribbon

The airport's reputation as a premier gateway airport between Asia and North America was made evident during Operation Yellow Ribbon on September 11, 2001. With U.S. airspace closed as a result of the terrorist attacks on New York and Washington, there was no choice for Vancouver International Airport but to take part in the operation since it was the only major Canadian airport on the West Coast of Canada that has the capability of handling large aircraft for trans-Pacific flights. The airport handled 34 flights—third highest total of flight that landed at a Canadian airport involved in the operation, behind Halifax and Gander—carrying 8,500 passengers—more passengers than any other Canadian airport—from Asia to destinations on the United States West Coast and points beyond.

The airport won the 2001 Airport Management Award from the B.C. Aviation Council[24] and was cited for overcoming many challenges in a professional and compassionate way.[25]

FBOs

There are several fixed base operators that service aircraft at Vancouver International Airport:

Accidents and incidents

YVR ATC Tower

References

  1. ^ Canada Flight Supplement. Effective 0901Z 20 September 2012 to 0901Z 15 November 2012
  2. ^ Synoptic/Metstat Station Information
  3. ^ a b c d "YVR Facts & Stats". yvr.ca. http://www.yvr.ca/en/about/facts-stats.aspx. Retrieved 2012-09-20.  Follow links for specific data.
  4. ^ "2010 Regional Airport Awards". Skytrax. 2010. http://www.worldairportawards.com/main/Press-APT2010.htm. Retrieved 2010-03-25. 
  5. ^ "2007 Regional Airport Awards". Skytrax. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-08-11. http://web.archive.org/web/20070811175324/http://www.worldairportawards.com/Awards_2007/ResultsFull.htm. Retrieved 2007-08-26. 
  6. ^ Campbell, Alan (April 23, 2012). "YVR wins best airport award again". Vancouver Sun. http://www.vancouversun.com/news/wins+best+airport+award+again/6505528/story.html. Retrieved 2012-05-22. 
  7. ^ "2006 Airport of the Year: Results". Skytrax. 2007. Archived from the original on 2007-03-18. http://web.archive.org/web/20070318032719/http://www.worldairportawards.com/Awards-2006/ResultsFull.htm. Retrieved 2007-04-04. 
  8. ^ "CTV British Columbia - YVR named best airport in North America - CTV News". Ctvbc.ctv.ca. March 24, 2010. http://www.ctvbc.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100324/bc_yvr_award_100324?hub=BritishColumbiaHome. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  9. ^ "Airport Divestiture Status Report". Tc.gc.ca. January 12, 2011. http://www.tc.gc.ca/programs/Airports/Status/menu.htm. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  10. ^ "YVR Leadership". http://www.yvr.ca/en/about/leadership.aspx. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  11. ^ The History of YVR
  12. ^ Hume, Mark. "Vancouver airport launches plan to lure Asia-Pacific traffic." The Globe and Mail. Wednesday January 25, 2012. Updated Friday January 27, 2012. Retrieved 2012-02-09.
  13. ^ "Contact Us." Pacific Coastal Airlines. Retrieved 2011-12-04. "Pacific Coastal Airlines Head Office Vancouver International Airport - South Terminal 4440 Cowley Crescent Unit 204 Richmond BC V7B 1B8"
  14. ^ stained glass at Vancouver International Airport. http://stainedglasscanada.ca/site.php?site=272
  15. ^ http://www.philippineairlines.com/Images/Intl%20Winter%20Timetable%20as%20of%20of%2025Sep2012_tcm61-78765.pdf
  16. ^ "Home". Seair Seaplanes. http://www.seairseaplanes.com/. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  17. ^ Sichuan Airlines opens flight to Vancouver_Local—China Economic Net
  18. ^ "Whistler Air". Whistlerair.ca. http://www.whistlerair.ca/. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  19. ^ The Guardian (London). http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-files/Business/pdf/2009/10/27/Swiss.pdf. 
  20. ^ Airpac Airlines Home
  21. ^ Green Coats Page
  22. ^ Green Coat FAQ
  23. ^ "YVR: Your Airport 2027, 20-Year Master Plan". 2007. http://www.yvr.ca/Libraries/Who_We_Are/yvr_masterplan.sflb.ashx. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  24. ^ "B.C. Aviation Council". Bcaviation.org. http://www.bcaviation.org/. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  25. ^ (PDF) 2001 Annual Report. Vancouver International Airport Authority. http://www.yvr.ca/pdf/authority/annualreport/yvr_annual_report_2001.pdf. Retrieved 2006-09-30. [dead link]
  26. ^ "Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19700301-0. Retrieved 2009-10-08. 
  27. ^ "C-GZOF Accident description". Aviation Safety Network. http://aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19950819-1. Retrieved 2010-06-25. 
  28. ^ "Transportation Safety Board of Canada Report 1995 - A95H0015". Tsb.gc.ca. July 31, 2008. http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/aviation/1995/a95h0015/a95h0015.asp. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  29. ^ "Taser video shows RCMP shocked immigrant within 25 seconds of their arrival". CBC. November 15, 2007. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2007/11/14/bc-taservideo.html. Retrieved 2007-11-15. 
  30. ^ "Wake turbulence blamed for fiery Richmond crash". The Vancouver Sun. May 28, 2011. http://www.canada.com/vancouversun/news/westcoastnews/story.html?id=f159398d-19e0-40b9-8f34-5b146a928463. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  31. ^ "Cathay Pacific statement on CX839 / CX838". Cathaypacific.com. http://www.cathaypacific.com/cpa/en_GB/aboutus/pressroomdetails?refID=0b5ce042c3e98210VgnVCM1000000ad21c39____. Retrieved 2011-03-03. 
  32. ^ "F-18s respond to airline bomb threat". CBC News. May 15, 2010. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2010/05/15/bc-plane-military-escort.html. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  33. ^ "Richmond plane crash leaves pilot dead". CBC News. October 28, 2011. http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2011/10/28/bc-vancouver-plane-crash-injured.html. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 
  34. ^ "GlobalBC TV Twitter". http://twitter.com/globalbc/status/137062379585409024. Retrieved 2012-09-20. 

External links