Vacation

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A vacation or holiday is a specific trip or journey, usually for the purpose of recreation or tourism. People often take a vacation during specific holiday observances, or for specific festivals or celebrations. Vacations are often spent with friends or family.

A person may take a longer break from work, such as a sabbatical, gap year, or career break.

The concept of taking a vacation is a recent invention, and has developed through the last two centuries. Historically, the idea of travel for recreation was a luxury that only wealthy people could afford (see Grand Tour). In the Puritan culture of early America, taking a break from work for reasons other than weekly observance of the Sabbath was frowned upon. However, the modern concept of vacation was led by a later religious movement encouraging spiritual retreat and recreation. The notion of breaking from work periodically took root among the middle and working class. [1]

Etymology[edit]

In the United Kingdom, vacation once specifically referred to the long summer break taken by the law courts and then later the term was applied to universities.[citation needed] The custom was introduced by William the Conqueror from Normandy where it facilitated the grape harvest.[citation needed] In the past, many upper-class families moved to a summer home for part of the year, leaving their usual home vacant.[citation needed]

Impact of Digital Communications[edit]

Recent developments in communication technology: internet, mobile, instant messaging, presence tracking, etc. have begun to change the nature of vacation. Workers may choose to unplug for a portion of a day and thus create the feeling of a "vacation" by simply separating themselves from the demands of constant digital communications. Antithetically, workers may take time out of the office to go on vacation, but remain plugged-in to work-related communications networks. While the remaining plugged-in over vacation may generate short-term business benefits, the long-term psychological impacts of these developments are only beginning to be understood. [2]

Regional meaning[edit]

Vacation, in English-speaking North America, describes recreational travel, such as a short pleasure trip, or a journey abroad. People in Commonwealth countries use the term holiday to describe absence from work as well as to describe a vacation or journey. Vacation can mean either staying home or going somewhere.

Canadians often use vacation and holiday interchangeably referring to a trip away from home or time off work. In Australia and the UK, holiday can refer to a vacation or a public holiday.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=105545388
  2. ^ http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/wired-success/201205/why-it-s-so-hard-unplug-the-digital-world