Upper Manhattan

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The George Washington Bridge, connecting Washington Heights in Upper Manhattan across the Hudson River to Fort Lee, New Jersey, is the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.[1][2]

Upper Manhattan denotes the more northerly region of the New York City Borough of Manhattan. Its southern boundary may be defined anywhere between 59th Street and 125th Street. Between these two extremes lies the most common definition of Upper Manhattan as Manhattan above 96th Street (the southern boundary of Manhattan Valley in the west and Spanish Harlem in the east). This definition of Upper Manhattan takes in the neighborhoods of Marble Hill, Inwood, Washington Heights (including Fort George, Sherman Creek and Hudson Heights), Harlem (including Sugar Hill and Hamilton Heights), and parts of the Upper West Side (Morningside Heights and Manhattan Valley).

In the late 19th century, the IRT Ninth Avenue Line and other elevated railroads brought urban sprawl to the previously rustic Upper Manhattan. Until the late 20th century it was less influenced by the gentrification that had taken place in other parts of New York over the previous 30 years.

Grant's Tomb is a major tourist attraction in Upper Manhattan

Like other residential areas, Upper Manhattan is not a major center of tourism in New York City, although some tourist attractions, such as Grant's Tomb, Riverside Park, the Apollo Theater, Fort Tryon Park, Sylvia's Restaurant, the Hamilton Grange, Morris–Jumel Mansion, Minton's Playhouse, Riverbank State Park, The Cloisters, Sakura Park, Sugar Hill, Riverside Church, and the National Jazz Museum in Harlem lie within it. Tourist maps similarly pay scant attention to the boroughs of the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island.

The Upper West Side is more affluent than its northern neighbors such as Manhattanville, Morningside Heights, Inwood, etc. The Upper East Side is similarly more affluent than its northern neighbor Spanish Harlem. Thus the 96th street definition comes from the East Side as well. Gentrification is occurring at a different pace, rate, and style than Soho, East Village, etc., due to different demographics.

All of Upper Manhattan is contained in the larger area New Yorkers know as Uptown (above 59th Street).

Many diplomatic missions are located in former mansions on the Upper East Side.

Government and infrastructure[edit]

Fire Protection[edit]

The New York City Fire Department currently operates 20 firehouses, organized into 6 Battalions in Midtown Manhattan. The following companies are quartered between 59th Street and the northern tip of Manhattan: Engine 22, Engine 35, Engine 37, Engine 39, Engine 40, Engine 44, Engine 47, Engine 53, Engine 58, Engine 59, Engine 67, Engine 69, Engine 74, Engine 76, Engine 80, Engine 84, Engine 91, Engine 93, Engine 95, Ladder 13, Ladder 14, Ladder 16, Ladder 22, Ladder 23, Ladder 25, Ladder 26, Ladder 28, Ladder 30, Ladder 34, Ladder 35, Ladder 36, Ladder 40, Ladder 43, Ladder 45, and the Chiefs of the 3rd Division, 10th Battalion, 11th Battalion, 12th Battalion, 13th Battalion, and 16th Battalion.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Port Authority of New York and New Jersey - George Washington Bridge". The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ Bod Woodruff, Lana Zak, and Stephanie Wash (November 20, 2012). "GW Bridge Painters: Dangerous Job on Top of the World's Busiest Bridge". ABC News. Retrieved September 13, 2013. 

Coordinates: 40°47′49″N 73°56′56″W / 40.797°N 73.949°W / 40.797; -73.949