United States v. Robinson

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United States v. Robinson
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Supreme Court of the United States
Argued October 9, 1973
Decided December 11, 1973
Full case nameUnited States v. Willie Robinson, Jr.
Citations414 U.S. 218 (more)
94 S.Ct. 467, 38 L.Ed.2d 427
Prior historyCertiorari to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
Subsequent history153 U.S.App.D.C. 114, 471 F.2d 1082, reversed
Holding
In the case of a lawful custodial arrest, a full search of the person is not only an exception to the warrant requirement of the Fourth Amendment, but is also a "reasonable" search under that Amendment.
Court membership
Case opinions
MajorityRehnquist, joined by Burger, Stewart, White, Blackmun, Powell
ConcurrencePowell
DissentMarshall, joined by Douglas, Brennan
 
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United States v. Robinson
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Supreme Court of the United States
Argued October 9, 1973
Decided December 11, 1973
Full case nameUnited States v. Willie Robinson, Jr.
Citations414 U.S. 218 (more)
94 S.Ct. 467, 38 L.Ed.2d 427
Prior historyCertiorari to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit
Subsequent history153 U.S.App.D.C. 114, 471 F.2d 1082, reversed
Holding
In the case of a lawful custodial arrest, a full search of the person is not only an exception to the warrant requirement of the Fourth Amendment, but is also a "reasonable" search under that Amendment.
Court membership
Case opinions
MajorityRehnquist, joined by Burger, Stewart, White, Blackmun, Powell
ConcurrencePowell
DissentMarshall, joined by Douglas, Brennan

United States v. Robinson, 414 U.S. 218 (1973), was a case in which the United States Supreme Court held that "in the case of a lawful custodial arrest a full search of the person is not only an exception to the warrant requirement of the 4th Amendment, but is also a reasonable search under that Amendment."

Contents

Facts

A D.C. Metro officer stopped a 1965 Cadillac based on reliable information that the driver's operating license had been revoked. All three occupants exited the car, and the officer arrested the driver, Robinson. (For purposes of the Court's opinion, it was assumed that Robinson's full-custody arrest was valid.) The officer proceeded to search Robinson, and felt a package whose contents the officer could not immediately identify. Upon removing the package—a crumpled cigarette packet—and opening it, the officer discovered "14 gelatin capsules of white powder" that turned out to be heroin.

Issue

Whether the officer's search of the defendant violated the Fourth Amendment?

Holding

No it did not. According to the Robinson Court "in the case of a lawful custodial arrest a full search of the person is not only an exception to the warrant requirement of the 4th Amendment, but is also a reasonable search under that Amendment."

See also

Further reading