United States twenty-dollar bill

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Twenty dollars
(United States)
Value$20
Width155.956 mm
Height66.294 mm
WeightApprox. 1 g
Paper type75% cotton
25% linen
Years of printing1861-present
Obverse
US $20 Series 2006 Obverse.jpg
DesignAndrew Jackson
Design date2003
Reverse
US $20 Series 2006 Reverse.jpg
DesignWhite House
Design date2003
 
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Twenty dollars
(United States)
Value$20
Width155.956 mm
Height66.294 mm
WeightApprox. 1 g
Paper type75% cotton
25% linen
Years of printing1861-present
Obverse
US $20 Series 2006 Obverse.jpg
DesignAndrew Jackson
Design date2003
Reverse
US $20 Series 2006 Reverse.jpg
DesignWhite House
Design date2003

The United States twenty-dollar bill ($20) is a denomination of U.S. currency. The seventh U.S. President (1829–37), Andrew Jackson has been featured on the front side of the bill since 1928, which is why the twenty-dollar bill is often called a "Jackson," while the White House is featured on the reverse side.

The twenty-dollar bill in the past was referred to as a "double-sawbuck" because it is twice the value of a ten-dollar bill, which was nicknamed a "sawbuck" due to the resemblance the Roman numeral for ten (X) bears to the legs of a sawbuck, although this usage had largely fallen out of favor by the 1980s.[1] The twenty-dollar gold coin was known as a "double eagle". Rather than a nickname, this nomenclature was specified by an act of Congress dated March 3, 1849.[specify]

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the average circulation life of a $20 bill is 25 months (2 years) before it is replaced due to wear.[2] Approximately 11% of all notes printed in 2009 were $20 bills.[3] Twenty-dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in violet straps.

Pre-Federal Reserve history[edit]

1863 $20 Legal Tender note


Thomas Sully portrait of Andrew Jackson used for the $20 bill from 1928 onward.
Series 1905 $20 gold certificate

Federal Reserve history[edit]

Series 1914 $20 bill
Series 1929 $20 bill
Series 1995 $20 bill
The security strip in a twenty-dollar bill glows green under a blacklight.

Jackson first appeared on the $20 bill in 1928. It is not clear the reason the bill was switched from Grover Cleveland to Andrew Jackson. According to the U.S. Treasury, "Treasury Department records do not reveal the reason that portraits of these particular statesmen were chosen in preference to those of other persons of equal importance and prominence."[4]

The placement of Jackson on the $20 bill may be a historical irony; as president, he vehemently opposed both the National Bank and paper money and made the goal of his administration the destruction of the National Bank.[5][6] In his farewell address to the nation, he cautioned the public about paper money.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Feldman, David (1990). Who Put the Butter in Butterfly?. New York, N.Y.: Harper & Row, Publishers, Inc. pp. 119–120. ISBN 0-06-091661-3. 
  2. ^ "Circulation Fact Sheet — The New Color of Money: When Will I See It?". U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Retrieved 2007-11-20. [dead link]
  3. ^ "Money Facts". Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 
  4. ^ "Selection of Portraits and Designs Appearing on Paper Currency". U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing. Archived from the original on 2007-09-28. Retrieved 2007-11-20. 
  5. ^ "Jackson as President". CliffsNotes. Retrieved 2007-11-20. 
  6. ^ "Jackson Vetoes Bank Bill — July 10, 1832". Miller Center of Public Affairs, University of Virginia. Retrieved 2007-11-20. 
  7. ^ "JAndrew Jackson's Farewell Address". Wikisource. Retrieved 2007-11-20. 
  8. ^ http://www.savewealth.com/news/9809/new20.html
  9. ^ "Anti-Counterfeiting". Bureau of Engraving and Printing (United States Treasury). 2007. Retrieved 2008-06-11. [dead link]

External links[edit]