United States ten-dollar bill

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Ten Dollars
(United States)
Value:10 United States dollars
Width:155.956 mm
Height:66.294 mm
Weight:Approx. 1 g
Security Features:Security thread, EURion constellation, Watermark, Color shifting ink, Microprinting
Paper Type:Cotton-linen
Years of Printing:2006–present
Obverse
Obverse
Design:Alexander Hamilton
Design Date:2006
Reverse
Reverse
Design:U.S. Treasury
Design Date:2006
 
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Ten Dollars
(United States)
Value:10 United States dollars
Width:155.956 mm
Height:66.294 mm
Weight:Approx. 1 g
Security Features:Security thread, EURion constellation, Watermark, Color shifting ink, Microprinting
Paper Type:Cotton-linen
Years of Printing:2006–present
Obverse
Obverse
Design:Alexander Hamilton
Design Date:2006
Reverse
Reverse
Design:U.S. Treasury
Design Date:2006

The United States ten-dollar bill ($10) is a denomination of United States currency. The first U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, Alexander Hamilton, is currently featured on the obverse of the bill, while the U.S. Treasury is featured on the reverse. (Hamilton is one of two non-presidents featured on currently issued U.S. bills. The other is Benjamin Franklin, on the $100 bill. In addition to this, Hamilton is one of only two persons featured on U.S. currency who was not born in the continental United States, as he was from the West Indies. The other, Kamehameha I, appears on the 2008 Hawaii state quarter.) All $10 bills issued today are Federal Reserve Notes.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the average life of a $10 bill in circulation is 18 months before it is replaced due to wear. Approximately 6% of all US banknotes printed in 2009 were $10 bills.[1] Ten dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in yellow straps.

The source of the face on the $10 bill is John Trumbull’s 1805 portrait of Hamilton that belongs to the portrait collection of New York City Hall. The $10 bill is the only U.S. paper currency in circulation in which the portrait faces to the left (the $100,000 bill featured a portrait of Woodrow Wilson facing to the left, but was used only for intra-government transactions).

Contents

Large size note history

(approximately 7.4218 × 3.125 in ≅ 189 × 79 mm)

Famous 1901 American Bison $10 bill

Small size note history

(6.14 × 2.61 in ≅ 156 × 66 mm)

Series 1928 $10 Gold Certificate
A Series 1934 A US $10 Note
The back side of a Series 1934 Note. The car is not a model-T but a composite of the cars used during that period
Special Issue Hawaii overprint $10 bill
The portrait on the bill is based on this portrait by John Trumbull.

Nicknames

The $10 bill has several nicknames, including:

References

  1. ^ "Money Facts". Bureau of Engraving and Printing. http://www.moneyfactory.gov/document.cfm/18/2230.
  2. ^ Fodor's Washington DC. Random House. 1991. pp. 76. "American Security Bank likes to boast in its commercials that it's "Right on the money"—"the money" in this case being a $10 dollar bill. If you look on the back of one you'll see the Treasury Building and to its right the tiny American Security bank building."
  3. ^ "Trademark search details for "Right on the money"". Boliven. http://www.boliven.com/trademark/73254939. Retrieved January 22, 2010.

External links