United States temperature extremes

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For the United States, the extremes are 134 °F (56.7 °C) in Death Valley, California and −79.8 °F (−62.1 °C) recorded in Prospect Creek, Alaska.

The largest recorded temperature change in one place over a 24-hour period occurred on January 15, 1972 in Loma, Montana, when the temperature rose from −54 to 49 °F (−47.8 to 9.4 °C).

The most dramatic temperature changes occur in North American climates susceptible to Chinook winds. For example, the largest 2-minute temperature change of 49 °F (27.2 °C) occurred in Spearfish, South Dakota, a rise from −4 to 45 °F (−20.0 to 7.2 °C).

Lack of extremes[edit]

Among the U.S. states, Hawaii has both the lowest state maximum of 100 °F (37.8 °C) and the highest state minimum of 12.0 °F (−11.1 °C). Indeed, tropical near-ocean locations such as Hawaii often have the lowest recorded temperature ranges, sometimes with a difference of as little as 62 °F (34.4 °C).[citation needed]

See also[edit]

U.S. state temperature extremes

External links[edit]