United States gubernatorial elections, 2010

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United States gubernatorial elections, 2010
United States
2009 ←
November 2, 2010
→ 2011

37 Governorships
(including a special election in Utah)
 Majority partyMinority party
 Haley Barbour by Gage Skidmore.jpgJack Markell.jpg
LeaderHaley BarbourJack Markell
PartyRepublicanDemocratic
Last election24 governorships26 governorships
Seats before23[1]26
Seats after2920
Seat changeIncrease6Decrease6
Popular vote33,851,797 [2]33,331,319
Percentage47.75%47.02%

2010 gubernatorial election results.svg

  Democratic hold
  Democratic pickups
  Independent pickup
  Republican pickups
  Republican hold
 
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United States gubernatorial elections, 2010
United States
2009 ←
November 2, 2010
→ 2011

37 Governorships
(including a special election in Utah)
 Majority partyMinority party
 Haley Barbour by Gage Skidmore.jpgJack Markell.jpg
LeaderHaley BarbourJack Markell
PartyRepublicanDemocratic
Last election24 governorships26 governorships
Seats before23[1]26
Seats after2920
Seat changeIncrease6Decrease6
Popular vote33,851,797 [2]33,331,319
Percentage47.75%47.02%

2010 gubernatorial election results.svg

  Democratic hold
  Democratic pickups
  Independent pickup
  Republican pickups
  Republican hold

The United States gubernatorial elections were held on Tuesday, November 2, 2010 in 37 states (36 were regularly scheduled while a special election was held in Utah). As in most midterm elections,[citation needed] the party controlling the White House lost ground. While Democrats did take five governorships from the Republicans (California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, and Vermont), Republicans took 11 governorships from the Democrats (Iowa, Kansas, Ohio, Oklahoma, Maine, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Wisconsin, and Wyoming). An independent won one governorship previously held by Republicans (in Rhode Island), while Republicans won one governorship previously held by an independent (in Florida). Thus, Republicans held a majority of governorships for the first time since before the 2006 elections. One state, Louisiana, had no election for governor, but did feature a special election for lieutenant governor.

Most gains were made in races where no incumbent was running (either due to term limits or voluntary retirement). Only two sitting governors were defeated for reelection— Democrats Ted Strickland and Chet Culver of Ohio and Iowa respectively.

These elections coincided with the elections for the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives as well as other state and local elections.

Contents

Summary of contests[edit]

Source: http://elections.nytimes.com/2010/results/governor

StateIncumbentPartyStatusCandidates
AlabamaBob RileyRepublicanTerm-limited, Republican victoryBentley, RobertRobert Bentley (R), 57.9%

Sparks, RonRon Sparks (D), 42.1%

AlaskaParnell, SeanSean ParnellRepublicanElected to full term, 58.9%Berkowitz, EthanEthan Berkowitz (D), 38.3%
ArizonaBrewer, JanJan BrewerRepublicanElected to full term, 54.7%Goddard, TerryTerry Goddard (D), 42.2%
ArkansasBeebe, MikeMike BeebeDemocraticRe-elected, 64.5%Keet, JimJim Keet (R), 33.6%
CaliforniaArnold SchwarzeneggerRepublicanTerm-limited, Democratic victoryBrown, JerryJerry Brown (D), 53.1%

Whitman, MegMeg Whitman (R), 41.7%

ColoradoBill RitterDemocraticRetired, Democratic victoryHickenlooper, JohnJohn Hickenlooper (D), 50.7%

Tancredo, TomTom Tancredo (Am.C.), 36.8%
Maes, DanDan Maes (R), 11.1%

ConnecticutJodi RellRepublicanRetired, Democratic victoryMalloy, DanDan Malloy (D), 49.6%

Foley, Thomas C.Thomas C. Foley (R), 48.9%

FloridaCharlie CristIndependentRetired, Republican victoryScott, RickRick Scott (R), 48.9%

Sink, AlexAlex Sink (D), 47.7%

GeorgiaSonny PerdueRepublicanTerm-limited, Republican victoryDeal, NathanNathan Deal (R), 52.9%

Barnes, RoyRoy Barnes (D), 43.1%

HawaiiLinda LingleRepublicanTerm-limited, Democratic victoryAbercrombie, NeilNeil Abercrombie (D), 58.2%

Aiona Jr., J.R.J.R. Aiona Jr. (R), 41.1%

IdahoOtter, ButchButch OtterRepublicanRe-elected, 59.1%Allred, KeithKeith Allred (D), 32.9%

Kemp, JanaJana Kemp (I), 5.9%

IllinoisQuinn, PatPat QuinnDemocraticElected to full term, 46.6%Brady, BillBill Brady (R), 46.1%
IowaCulver, ChetChet CulverDemocraticDefeated, 43.3%Branstad, TerryTerry Branstad (R), 53.0%
KansasMark ParkinsonDemocraticRetired, Republican victoryBrownback, SamSam Brownback (R), 63.4%

Holland, TomTom Holland (D), 32.1%

MaineJohn BaldacciDemocraticTerm-limited, Republican victoryLePage, PaulPaul LePage (R), 38.3%

Cutler, EliotEliot Cutler (I), 36.5%
Mitchell, LibbyLibby Mitchell (D), 19.1%

MarylandO'Malley, MartinMartin O'MalleyDemocraticRe-elected, 55.8%Ehrlich, RobertRobert Ehrlich (R), 42.3%
MassachusettsPatrick, DevalDeval PatrickDemocraticRe-elected, 48.4%Baker, CharlieCharlie Baker (R), 42.1%

Tim Cahill (I), 8.0%

MichiganJennifer GranholmDemocraticTerm-limited, Republican victorySnyder, RickRick Snyder (R), 58.1%

Bernero, VirgVirg Bernero (D), 39.9%

MinnesotaTim PawlentyRepublicanRetired, Democratic victoryDayton, MarkMark Dayton (D), 43.7%

Emmer, TomTom Emmer (R), 43.2%
Horner, TomTom Horner (I), 11.9%

NebraskaHeineman, DaveDave HeinemanRepublicanRe-elected, 74.3%Meister, MikeMike Meister (D), 25.7%
NevadaJim GibbonsRepublicanDefeated in primary, Republican victorySandoval, BrianBrian Sandoval (R), 53.4%

Reid, RoryRory Reid (D), 41.6%

New HampshireLynch, JohnJohn LynchDemocraticRe-elected, 52.6%Stephen, JohnJohn Stephen (R), 45.1%
New MexicoBill RichardsonDemocraticTerm-limited, Republican victoryMartinez, SusanaSusana Martinez (R), 53.6%

Denish, DianeDiane Denish (D), 46.4%

New YorkDavid PatersonDemocraticWithdrew from primary, Democratic victoryCuomo, AndrewAndrew Cuomo (D), 61.4%

Paladino, CarlCarl Paladino (R), 34.1%

OhioStrickland, TedTed StricklandDemocraticDefeated, 46.7%Kasich, JohnJohn Kasich (R), 49.4%
OklahomaBrad HenryDemocraticTerm-limited, Republican victoryFallin, MaryMary Fallin (R), 60.1%

Askins, JariJari Askins (D), 39.9%

OregonTed KulongoskiDemocraticTerm-limited, Democratic victoryKitzhaber, JohnJohn Kitzhaber (D), 49.2%

Dudley, ChrisChris Dudley (R), 48.1%

PennsylvaniaEd RendellDemocraticTerm-limited, Republican victoryCorbett, TomTom Corbett (R), 54.5%

Onorato, DanDan Onorato (D), 45.5%

Rhode IslandDonald CarcieriRepublicanTerm-limited, Independent victoryChafee, LincolnLincoln Chafee (I), 36.1%

Robitaille, JohnJohn Robitaille (R), 33.6%
Caprio, FrankFrank Caprio (D), 23.0%

South CarolinaMark SanfordRepublicanTerm-limited, Republican victoryHaley, NikkiNikki Haley (R), 51.4%

Sheheen, VincentVincent Sheheen (D), 47.1%

South DakotaMike RoundsRepublicanTerm-limited, Republican victoryDaugaard, DennisDennis Daugaard (R), 61.5%

Heidepriem, ScottScott Heidepriem (D), 38.5%

TennesseePhil BredesenDemocraticTerm-limited, Republican victoryHaslam, BillBill Haslam (R), 65.0%

McWherter, MikeMike McWherter (D), 33.1%

TexasPerry, RickRick PerryRepublicanRe-elected, 55.1%White, BillBill White (D), 42.3%
UtahHerbert, GaryGary HerbertRepublicanElected to finish term, 64.2%Corroon, PeterPeter Corroon (D), 31.8%
VermontJim DouglasRepublicanRetired, Democratic victoryShumlin, PeterPeter Shumlin (D), 49.6%

Dubie, BrianBrian Dubie (R), 47.8%

WisconsinJim DoyleDemocraticRetired, Republican victoryWalker, ScottScott Walker (R), 52.3%

Barrett, TomTom Barrett (D), 46.6%

WyomingDave FreudenthalDemocraticTerm-limited, Republican victoryMead, MattMatt Mead (R), 71.6%

Petersen, LeslieLeslie Petersen (D), 25.1%

Predictions[edit]

The following seats are considered safe in all current predictions:

Democratic: None
Republican: Nebraska, Wyoming
SourceSafe DemocraticLikely DemocraticLeans DemocraticTossupLeans RepublicanLikely RepublicanSafe Republican
Real Clear Politics
(updates)
as of October 20, 2010
Arkansas
New Hampshire
New York
Colorado
Maryland
Connecticut
Minnesota
California
Florida
Hawaii
Illinois
Maine
Massachusetts
Oregon
Rhode Island
Vermont
Georgia
New Mexico
Ohio
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Texas
Wisconsin
Alaska
Arizona
Iowa
Michigan
Nevada
Alabama
Idaho
Kansas
Oklahoma
Tennessee
South Dakota
Utah
Rasmussen Reports
(updates)
as of October 20, 2010
New Hampshire
New York
California
Arkansas
Maryland
Massachusetts
Connecticut
Hawaii
Minnesota
Colorado
Maine
Ohio
Oregon
Rhode Island
Vermont
Florida
Illinois
New Mexico
Wisconsin
Georgia
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Idaho
Nevada
South Carolina
South Dakota
Texas
Utah
Iowa
Illinois
Kansas
Maine
Michigan
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
fivethirtyeight
(updates)
as of September 25, 2010
Arkansas
New York
Connecticut
Hawaii
Colorado
Maine
New Hampshire
Oregon
California
Florida
Georgia
Minnesota
Illinois
Maryland
Massachusetts
New Mexico
Ohio
Rhode Island
Texas
Vermont
Wisconsin
Alabama
Arizona
Michigan
Iowa
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Nevada
South Carolina
Alaska
Idaho
Kansas
South Dakota
Utah
Larry Sabato's Crystal Ball
(updates)
as of September 30, 2010
Arkansas
Colorado
New York
Hawaii
Connecticut
Maryland
NewHampshire
California
Georgia
Florida
Maine
Massachusetts
Ohio
Minnesota
Rhode Island
Vermont
Illinois
New Mexico
Oregon
South Carolina
Texas
Wisconsin
Alabama
Arizona
Idaho
Nevada
South Dakota
Iowa
Michigan
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Tennessee
Alaska
Kansas
Utah
The Cook Political Report
(updates)
as of October 1, 2010
Arkansas
New York
Colorado
Hawaii
California
Connecticut
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
New Hampshire
Minnesota
Nevada
New Mexico
Ohio
Oregon
Rhode Island
Texas
Vermont
Wisconsin
Alabama
Michigan
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
Arizona
South Carolina
South Dakota
Iowa
Tennessee
Alaska
Idaho
Kansas
Utah
The Rothenberg Political Report
(updates)
as of September 24, 2010
Arkansas
New York
ColoradoConnecticut
Hawaii
New Hampshire
California
Georgia
Florida
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Minnesota
New Mexico
Ohio
Oregon
Wisconsin
Rhode Island
Texas
Vermont
Arizona
Illinois
Iowa
Michigan
Pennsylvania
Alabama
Alaska
Idaho
Nevada
South Carolina
South Dakota
Utah
Kansas
Oklahoma
Tennessee
CQ Politics
(updates)
as of April 7, 2010
Hawaii
New Hampshire
New Mexico
New York
California
Illinois
Maine
Maryland
Oregon
Colorado
Connecticut
Florida
Iowa
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Nevada
Ohio
Rhode Island
Vermont
Wisconsin
Alabama
Arizona
Georgia
Oklahoma
Pennsylvania
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Alaska
Idaho

Kansas
South Dakota
Utah
The Swing State Project
(updates)
as of September 22, 2010
Colorado
New Hampshire
New York
Connecticut
Hawaii
California
Florida
Georgia
Maryland
Massachusetts
Ohio
Oregon

Minnesota
Rhode Island
Vermont
Arizona
Iowa
Illinois
Maine
New Mexico
Pennsylvania
Wisconsin
Texas
Alabama
Idaho
Nevada
South Carolina
South Dakota
Utah
Kansas
Michigan
Oklahoma
Tennessee
Alaska

Election summaries[edit]

Vote by county (click image for more details)

Sixteen governors are prohibited from seeking re-election in 2010 due to term limits. Additional open seats are possible if any of the governors listed below dies, resigns, retires, or is denied re-nomination in his or her party's primary election.

Retiring or term-limited Democratic governors[edit]

Bill Ritter (Colorado)[edit]

Governor Bill Ritter did not seek re-election for a second term.[3] He had been elected with 57% of the vote in 2006. Following Ritter's announcement, Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper announced his candidacy.[4] Hickenlooper faced no opposition in the Democratic primary.[5]

Businessman Dan Maes became the Republican nominee by winning the August 10 primary election.[6]

Former Congressman Tom Tancredo ran under the banner of the American Constitution Party.[7]

In the general, Hickenlooper decisively defeated Tancredo and Maes. Maes won only 11.6% of the vote, nearly reducing the Republican Party to minor-party status in Colorado.[8]

Mark Parkinson (Kansas)[edit]

Governor Kathleen Sebelius was term-limited in 2010.[9] President Barack Obama nominated Sebelius as Secretary of Health and Human Services[10] Mark Parkinson, her replacement, did not seek a full term, and Republican Senator Sam Brownback defeated Democratic state Senator Tom Holland in the general election.

John Baldacci (Maine)[edit]

Governor John Baldacci is term-limited in 2010.

At the gubernatorial primary election on June 8, Maine Democrats chose State Senator Elizabeth "Libby" Mitchell as their nominee,[11] while Waterville Mayor Paul LePage was chosen by the Republicans.[12]

Three independent candidates were on the November 2 ballot: Eliot Cutler, lawyer, former staff member for U.S. Senator Edmund Muskie, and former adviser to President Jimmy Carter;[13] Shawn Moody, business owner;[14] and Kevin Scott, business owner.[15]

The Maine Green Independent Party did not have a candidate on the ballot this year.[16]

With 94% of precincts reporting on the day after the general election, the Bangor Daily News declared LePage the winner, carrying 38.1% of the votes.[17] Cutler was in second place with 36.7% of the votes (less than 7,500 votes behind LePage), while Mitchell was a distant third with 19%.[17] Moody and Scott had 5% and 1%, respectively.[17]

Jennifer Granholm (Michigan)[edit]

Governor Jennifer Granholm is term-limited in 2010.[18]

The party primaries on August 3 had five Republicans and two Democrats on the ballot.

On the Republican side, businessman Rick Snyder defeated Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox, Oakland County Sheriff Mike Bouchard, Michigan State Senator Tom George and U.S. Representative Peter Hoekstra for the GOP nomination.[19]

On the Democratic side, Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero easily defeated state House Speaker Andy Dillon for the party nomination.[20]

In the general election Rick Snyder defeated Virg Bernero in a landslide.

Bill Richardson (New Mexico)[edit]

Governor Bill Richardson is term-limited in 2010.[9]

Lieutenant Governor Diane Denish (D) obtained the Democratic Party nomination by winning the June 1, 2010 primary without opposition.[21]

Doña Ana County District Attorney Susana Martinez[22] won the Republican nominee for Governor of New Mexico by winning the June 1, 2010 primary with 51% of the vote against four other candidates. Martinez is the first Latina woman nominated by a major party for governor anywhere in the United States.[23][24] Martinez defeated: PR Firm owner Doug Turner,[25] Pete Domenici, Jr. (son of the former U.S. Senator Pete Domenici), State Representative Janice Arnold-Jones,[26] and former Republican party state chairman Allen Weh.[27] The election will result in New Mexico's first female governor.[28] Martinez defeated Denish and became the nation's first Latina governor

David Paterson (New York)[edit]

Governor David Paterson originally announced he would seek a first full term in 2010.[29] Paterson became Governor of New York when Eliot Spitzer resigned amid a prostitution scandal on March 17, 2008. He was likely to face a tough primary challenge from Attorney General Andrew Cuomo, who leads him (and all other opponents) in polling. Paterson announced on February 26, 2010, that he would not be a candidate in the Democratic primary; Cuomo entered the race on May 24 of the same year. Businessman Carl Paladino defeated former Congressman Rick Lazio for the Republican nomination in a primary election, drawing heavily on support from upstate New York.[30] Cuomo soundly defeated Paladino in the general election.

Brad Henry (Oklahoma)[edit]

Democratic Governor Brad Henry is term-limited in 2010.[9]

Two Democrats have announced their candidacies: state Attorney General Drew Edmondson,[31] and Lieutenant Governor Jari Askins, who would be Oklahoma's first female governor.[32]

Two Republicans have announced their candidacies: Congresswoman and former lieutenant governor Mary Fallin,[33] who would also be Oklahoma's first female Governor, and state Senator Randy Brogdon.[34] Oklahoma which tilts Republican in party affiliation is considered a strong pickup opportunity for the GOP. Either outcome would have resulted in Oklahoma's first female governor, as both Fallin and Askins won their primaries; Fallin defeated Askins in the general election.

Ted Kulongoski (Oregon)[edit]

Governor Ted Kulongoski is term-limited in 2010.[9] Former two-term Governor John Kitzhaber was the Democratic nominee and former Portland Trail Blazers basketball player Chris Dudley was his Republican opponent. In the primaries, Kitzhaber defeated former state Secretary of State Bill Bradbury, and Dudley won a plurality among a large field of candidates which included former Oregon State Treasurer candidate Allen Alley and former state Representative John Lim.[35] Greg Kord of the Constitution Party and Wes Wagner of the Libertarian Party are also running.[36] Kitzhaber defeated Dudley in the general election; his election marked the first time in Oregon that a person had been elected to three terms as governor.

Ed Rendell (Pennsylvania)[edit]

Governor Ed Rendell is term-limited in 2010.[9]

Republican Attorney General Tom Corbett was the Republican nominee for Governor. Republican Congressman Jim Gerlach had formed an exploratory committee and initiated a campaign in 2009, however, he eventually dropped out of the race in early 2010 in order to run for re-election to his seat in the House.[37] The Democratic nominee was Allegheny County Executive Dan Onorato. Corbett was considered the marginal favorite in a competitive election, and defeated Onorato.

Phil Bredesen (Tennessee)[edit]

Democratic Governor Phil Bredesen is term-limited in 2010.[9]

On the Republican side, Congressman Zach Wamp of the state's 3rd District,[38] Knoxville Mayor Bill Haslam,[39] and military veteran, internet sensation, and activist Basil Marceaux and Lieutenant Governor Ron Ramsey announced their candidacies.[40] Bill Haslam was the Republican nominee for Governor.

On the Democratic side, businessman Mike McWherter (son of a former Tennessee governor) is running for the Democratic nomination.[41]

There are several independent candidates as well, including Toni K. Hall, a college Economics instructor.

Several non-partisan sources determined that the race was leaning Republican, and Haslam soundly defeated McWherter.

Jim Doyle (Wisconsin)[edit]

Governor Jim Doyle did not seek a third term in 2010. He was re-elected with 53% of the vote in 2006. The resignation of his legal counsel as well as dipping poll numbers may have contributed to his decision to not seek re-election.[42]

Democratic Lt. Governor Barbara Lawton said in a statement on October 26, 2009 that she will not seek the Democratic nomination for Governor. Milwaukee mayor Tom Barrett[43] and Jared Gary Christiansen both filed to run as Democrats.[44]

On April 28, 2009, Milwaukee County Executive Scott Walker announced that he would seek the Republican nomination for Governor. Additionally, former Congressman Mark Neumann indicated that he too would enter the Republican primary by Fall 2009. A third candidate, Appleton businessman, Mark Todd, filed as well.[45]

Raymond L. Ertl ran as an Independent. He ran a grassroots campaign, and is based out of Milwaukee's East Side.

On November 2, 2010, in the general election, Republican Scott Walker defeated Democrat Tom Barrett to become the 45th Governor of Wisconsin. Walker was inaugurated as Governor on January 3, 2011.

Dave Freudenthal (Wyoming)[edit]

Governor Dave Freudenthal is term-limited in 2010, but a recent Wyoming Supreme Court ruling invalidated legislative term-limits. Freudenthal announced on March 4, 2010, that he would not seek a third term.[46][47]

Former U.S. Attorney Matt Mead, a Republican, defeated former state Democratic Party Chairwoman Leslie Petersen in a landslide.

Retiring or term-limited Republican governors[edit]

Bob Riley (Alabama)[edit]

Governor Bob Riley is term-limited in 2010.

Businessman and 2002 Republican gubernatorial primary candidate Timothy James, State Representative Robert Bentley,[48] Chancellor Bradley Byrne,[49] and Former state Supreme Court chief justice Roy Moore, were all major contenders for the Republican nomination. In the June 1 primary, Byrne finished in first place with 28.9% followed by Robert J. Bentley who won 25.2% of the vote. Due to state law, the two were forced into a July runoff election where Bentley defeated Byrne by a margin of 56.1 to 43.9% to win the Republican Nomination.[50]

For the Democratic side, State Agriculture Commissioner Ron Sparks easily defeated Congressman Artur Davis of Alabama's 7th congressional district in the June 1 primary.[51]

In the general election, Bentley defeated Sparks.

Arnold Schwarzenegger (California)[edit]

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger is term-limited in 2010.[9]

Former eBay CEO Meg Whitman was the Republican nominee for the Gubernatorial election,[52] defeating state Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner in the California Republican Party primary.

Former Governor and current Attorney General Jerry Brown was the Democratic nominee.[53] [54] [55]

Brown defeated Whitman in the general election.

Jodi Rell (Connecticut)[edit]

On November 9, 2009, popular incumbent Governor Jodi Rell announced she would not seek a second full term in 2010.[56] She was elected to a full term in 2006 with 63% of the vote.

The Republican nomination was won by Former United States Ambassador to Ireland Thomas C. Foley, who defeated Lt. Governor Michael Fedele.

The Democratic nominee is Stamford Mayor Dan Malloy, who defeated businessman and 2006 Democratic Senatorial nominee Ned Lamont.[57]

Sonny Perdue (Georgia)[edit]

Governor Sonny Perdue is term-limited in 2010.[58]

On the Republican side, former Secretary of State Karen Handel, and former Congressman Nathan Deal will face each other in a runoff, defeating other candidates including state Insurance Commissioner John Oxendine in the July 20 primary. Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle had established an exploratory committee in September 2008[59] but dropped out of the race on April 15, 2009 because of health problems.[58]

On the Democratic side, former Governor Roy Barnes, whom Perdue unseated in 2002 won the July 20 primary against former state Secretary of State David Poythress, state Attorney General Thurbert Baker, and state House Minority Leader DuBose Porter are running.[60]

The Libertarian Party will field as its candidate John Monds, who serves as president of the Grady County NAACP and was the first Libertarian candidate in U.S. history to receive more than one million votes, when he ran for the Georgia Public Service Commission in 2008.

Felix Camacho (Guam)[edit]

Governor Felix Camacho is term-limited in 2010. Lieutenant Governor Michael W. Cruz, a surgeon who is a veteran of the Gulf War and Iraq War, is running for the Republican nomination against Senator Eddie B. Calvo. On the Democratic side, former governor Carl Gutierrez has announced that he will run. Attorney Mike Phillips is also considering a bid for the governorship.

Linda Lingle (Hawaii)[edit]

Governor Linda Lingle is term-limited in 2010.[9]

Republican Lieutenant Governor James Aiona is running.[61]

Democratic Congressman Neil Abercrombie has announced he will run.[62] Another possible Democratic candidate is Honolulu mayor Mufi Hannemann.[62]

Tim Pawlenty (Minnesota)[edit]

Governor Tim Pawlenty would have been eligible to seek a third term in 2010, but decided not to run.[63] He won re-election by 1% in 2006, with 46.7% of the vote.[64]

For Republicans, potential candidates have included former U.S. Senator Norm Coleman, former House Minority Leader Marty Seifert, State Representative Tom Emmer, State Senator David Hann, and several other less prominent politicians, such as former State Representative Bill Haas. Former Minnesota State Auditor Patricia Anderson also sought the endorsement briefly, but later withdrew in order to again run for state auditor.[65] As the campaign season progressed, Coleman, Hann and Haas withdrew from the contest.

Among Democrats, former U.S. Senator Mark Dayton, state senator John Marty, former State Representative Matt Entenza, former State Senator Steve Kelley, State Representative Paul Thissen, Minnesota House Speaker Margaret Anderson Kelliher, Ramsey County Attorney Susan Gaertner, State Representative Tom Rukavina, and Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak have all announced their candidacies. State Senator Tom Bakk withdrew from the race in March 2010.[66] Saint Paul Mayor Chris Coleman has announced he will not run.[58]

Minnesota House Speaker Margaret Anderson Kelliher won the endorsement of the Minnesota DFL Party, but still faced Mark Dayton and Matt Entenza in the August 10 Primary. The Republican Party endorsed State Representative Tom Emmer.

In the August 10 primary, Mark Dayton won a narrow victory over DFL-endorsed candidate Margaret Anderson Kelliher. Republican-endorsed candidate Tom Emmer easily won the GOP primary. Independence Party candidate Tom Horner also won his party's primary.

Donald Carcieri (Rhode Island)[edit]

Governor Donald Carcieri is term-limited in 2010.[9]

State Representative Joe Trillo is a potential Republican candidate.[67]

On the Democratic side, State General Treasurer Frank Caprio is the defacto nominee with Attorney General Patrick C. Lynch dropping out of the race for governor.[67]

Former Republican Senator Lincoln D. Chafee has formed an exploratory committee for a potential campaign as an independent.[68] After deciding to run, Senator Chafee went on to win the election.

Mark Sanford (South Carolina)[edit]

Governor Mark Sanford is term-limited in 2010.[9]

On the Republican side, State Senator Nikki Haley ran, defeating Congressman Gresham Barrett in a June 22, 2010 run-off election.[69] She's entering into the race with the potential to become the state's first female governor as well as its first Indian governor.

On the Democratic side, Vincent Sheheen is the candidate, having defeated all other candidates in the primary election.[70]

Mike Rounds (South Dakota)[edit]

Governor Mike Rounds is term-limited in 2010.[9]

On the Republican side, State Senators Dave Knudson and Gordon Howie,[71] Lieutenant Governor Dennis Daugaard,[72] Brookings Mayor Scott Munsterman,[72][73] and rancher Ken Knuppe[74] have announced they are running.

On the Democratic side, the only candidate thus far is state Senator Scott Heidepriem who announced his candidacy in July, 2009.[75] United States Representative Stephanie Herseth Sandlin who represents the state at-large in the United States House of Representatives has announced that she will run for re-election rather than for Governor or the Senate seat currently held by incumbent John Thune in 2010.[75]

Jim Douglas (Vermont)[edit]

Governor Jim Douglas will not seek a fifth two-year term in 2010.[76] (The governors of Vermont and New Hampshire serve two-year terms.) Douglas was re-elected in 2008 with 53% of the vote. Republican Lieutenant Governor Brian Dubie has announced his candidacy.[77] Former State Auditor and current State Senator Randy Brock who is African-American is rumored as possible Republican candidate.[78]

Peter Shumlin won the Democratic primary according to the uncertified tabulation of statewide votes released by the Office of the Secretary of State on August 27, 2010, by 197 votes over Doug Racine, who requested a recount.[79]

Retiring Independent governor[edit]

Charlie Crist (Florida)[edit]

First-term Governor Charlie Crist is eligible to seek re-election, but decided instead to run for the United States Senate seat currently held by George LeMieux.[80] After a tough primary challenge the Republican Party chose businessman Rick Scott over Florida Attorney General Bill McCollum. The Democratic Party nominated Florida CFO Alex Sink.

Crist was elected as a Republican, but left the party and became an independent during his Senate campaign.

Republican governors defeated in Primary Nomination[edit]

Jim Gibbons (Nevada)[edit]

Governor Jim Gibbons sought a second term in 2010. He was elected in 2006 with 48% of the vote. Gibbons, who had low approval ratings in 2009, had two announced challengers before the end of the year from within his own party. Former State Senator Joe Heck and former North Las Vegas Mayor Mike Montandon have both announced that they will challenge Gibbons in the Republican primary.[81] Former federal judge Brian Sandoval announced his candidacy for governor in September 2009.[82] On June 8, 2010 Gibbons was defeated in the Republican primary by Sandoval.

The Democratic candidate is Rory Reid, Clark County Commissioner and the son of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.[83]

The Libertarian candidate is Arthur Forest Lampitt, Jr. Before running for office, Forest was an IT management consultant and small business owner.[84]

The Green candidate is David Scott Curtis. He is a residential designer and public artist.[84]

Democratic governors who are seeking re-election or election[edit]

Mike Beebe (Arkansas)[edit]

Governor Mike Beebe is seeking a second term in 2010.[9] He was elected with 55% of the vote in 2006.[85] In March 2009 Beebe's approval rating was 68%, according to Public Policy Polling.[86] Jim Keet, a former State Senator, is the Republican nominee.

Pat Quinn (Illinois)[edit]

Governor Pat Quinn is seeking a full term in 2010. On January 29, 2009, by succession, Quinn became Governor when Governor Rod Blagojevich was impeached, convicted and removed from office by the Illinois State Senate.[87] Quinn was challenged for the Democratic nomination by State Comptroller Dan Hynes.[88] On February 2, Quinn defeated Hynes by a narrow margin in a 50-50 split in the statewide primary. Despite trailing by only a few thousand votes, Hynes declined a recount and conceded the election to Quinn.[89]

The six-man Republican primary wasn't decided until March 5, 2010 when the final tally was announced. Only 193 votes (two-thousandths of one-percent) separated State Senator Bill Brady leading State Senator and former gubernatorial Chief of Staff Kirk Dillard, out of more than 750,000 votes. Dillard said he would not challenge the results for financial and political reasons. Political experts ABC talked with said, "unless Dillard had evidence of specific miscounting or fraud, it's not worth asking for a recount. And it's certainly better for party unity."[90]

Chet Culver (Iowa)[edit]

Governor Chet Culver is seeking a second term in 2010. He was elected with 54% of the vote in 2006.

Former Governor Terry Branstad, whose four terms in the governor's mansion made him the longest-serving governor in Iowa history, has formed an exploratory committee for the race.[91] Republican Congressman Steve King was the subject of some early speculation but announced that he would run for re-election to the House in August 2009.[92] Businessman Bob Vander Plaats, who was the Republican nominee for lieutenant governor in 2006, is running[93] considered an early front-runner in the Republican primary.[94] Other Republicans seeking their party's nomination include State Representatives Christopher Rants[93] and businessman Christian Fong.[95] Branstad is the favorite for Republican nomination and leads incumbent Democratic Governor Chet Culver in aggregate polling.[96]

Martin O'Malley (Maryland)[edit]

Governor Martin O'Malley is beginning to fundraise for a reelection campaign, but an official announcement is not expected until 2010.[97] He was elected with 53% of the vote in 2006.

Former Republican Governor Bob Ehrlich on March 30, 2010 announced he will run.[98] In the last election, in 2006, O'Malley narrowly defeated Ehrlich, who ran as an incumbent. In the primary Ehrlich will face business owner Brian Murphy.[99][100]

Deval Patrick (Massachusetts)[edit]

Incumbent first-term Governor Deval Patrick, a Democrat, will be seeking re-election.[101] He was elected with 56% of the vote in 2006.

Charles D. Baker, Jr. is the Republican candidate, while Jill Stein is the candidate of the Green-Rainbow Party.[102]

Tim Cahill, Treasurer of Massachusetts will run as an Independent. If Cahill was elected, he would be the first independent candidate to win statewide in the Commonwealth.[103]

John Lynch (New Hampshire)[edit]

Governor John Lynch has announced that he will seek a fourth two-year term in 2010. (The governors of New Hampshire and Vermont serve two-year terms.) He was re-elected with 70% of the vote in 2008.

Ted Strickland (Ohio)[edit]

Governor Ted Strickland sought a second term in 2010. He was elected with 60% of the vote in 2006.

John Kasich, a former congressman from Ohio's 12th congressional district and Chairman of the United States House Committee on the Budget is the Republican nominee.[104] Recent Polling has shown this race to be competitive with Rasmussen Reports polling in August 2010 showing John Kasich ahead of incumbent Governor Strickland by a 47 to 39% margin.[105] A survey from Public Policy Polling from the same month found similar results with Governor Strickland trailing former Congressman Kasich by a 50 to 40% margin.[106]

John de Jongh (United States Virgin Islands)[edit]

Incumbent Governor John de Jongh is seeking re-election for a second term in 2010. He was elected with 57% of the vote (in a runoff) in 2006 over Kenneth Mapp.

On September 11, 2010, Governor John de Jongh won the Democratic primary election with 53% of the vote.[107] De Jongh defeated Senator Adlah Donastorg, former Lt. Governor Gerard Luz James and James O'Bryan Jr. with more votes than all three of his Democratic challengers combined.[107]

De Jongh will now face independent candidate Kenneth Mapp, a former Lieutenant Governor of the United States Virgin Islands, in the general election on November 2, 2010.[107]

Republican governors who sought re-election or election[edit]

Sean Parnell (Alaska)[edit]

Governor Sarah Palin was elected in 2006 with 48% of the vote and was eligible to seek reelection in 2010. On July 3, 2009, Palin announced that she will not run for reelection and resigned on July 26, 2009. On July 26, Lt. Gov. Sean Parnell became the 12th Governor of Alaska.[108] Parnell has officially announced he will be running for a first full-term in 2010 and in August 2010 he won the Republican nomination for Governor.

Parnell will now face former State Representative and 2008 congressional nominee Ethan Berkowitz, won the Democratic nomination against State Senator Hollis French, in the November election.[109]

Jan Brewer (Arizona)[edit]

Democratic Governor Janet Napolitano was nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the United States Senate as Secretary of Homeland Security in early 2009. Republican Secretary of State Jan Brewer was first in the state's gubernatorial line of succession and became governor upon Napolitano's subsequent resignation. Brewer is seeking a full term in 2010.[110] She will face a primary challenge from former state Senator Karen Johnson,[111] Tucson attorney John Munger,[112] and State Treasurer Dean Martin.[113]

The announced Democratic candidate is Arizona Attorney General Terry Goddard. A potential Democratic candidate is Phoenix mayor Phil Gordon.[114]

Jan Brewer won the Republican primary election and Terry Goddard won the Democratic primary election.

Butch Otter (Idaho)[edit]

Governor Butch Otter is seeking a second term in 2010. A former state legislator, lieutenant governor and Congressman, Otter was elected in 2006 with 52 percent of the vote but has struggled to implement many of his policies despite an overwhelmingly Republican Idaho Legislature.[115] In May 2010 Otter brushed aside primary challenges from Ada County commissioner Sharon Ullman[116] and conservative activist Rex Rammell, who ran for U.S. Senate in 2008 as an independent.[117]

Democratic primary candidates included activist and mediator Keith G. Allred,[115] and Franklin County laborer Lon Chaney, who unsuccessfully contested the Democratic nomination in 2006.[118] Allred easily defeated Chaney for the Democratic nomination.

Former Republican state representative Jana Kemp is an announced independent candidate.[119]

Dave Heineman (Nebraska)[edit]

Governor Dave Heineman succeeded Mike Johanns upon Johanns's confirmation as United States Secretary of Agriculture. Heineman won election in 2006 against David Hahn with 73% of the vote and is eligible for a second full term in 2010.[120]

Rick Perry (Texas)[edit]

Texas Governor Rick Perry won the GOP gubernatorial primary with 51% of the vote on March 2, 2010.[121] Perry, who is seeking a third full term, is the longest serving governor in the history of Texas. U.S. Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison challenged Perry in the Republican primary.[121] On December 4, 2008, Hutchison filed papers to set up an exploratory committee[122] and confirmed in July 2009 that she would be making her official entry into the race in August. Perry led in primary and general election match ups according to aggregate polling.[123] Dedra Medina also challenged Perry and Hutchison for Republican nomination.[124][125]

Outgoing Houston Mayor Bill White won the Texas Democratic primary, beating Houston businessman Farouk Shami.[121]

Gary Herbert (Utah)[edit]

Governor Jon Huntsman, Jr. was nominated by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the Senate as the United States Ambassador to China. Lt. Governor Gary Herbert became governor on August 11, 2009. Utah law requires that a special election be held in 2010 to fill the remainder of the term, which expires in January 2013. Herbert has said he plans to run in the election and is favored to win in the general election in this conservative state.

The Democratic nominee is Salt Lake County Mayor Peter Corroon, who won his party's nomination unopposed at the Democratic Party Convention.

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External links[edit]