United States five-dollar bill

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Five dollars
(United States)
Value$5
Width155.956 mm
Height66.294 mm
WeightApprox. 1 g
Paper type75% cotton
25% linen
Obverse
New five dollar bill.jpg
DesignAbraham Lincoln
Design date2006
Reverse
Series2006 NoteBack 5.jpg
DesignLincoln Memorial
Design date2006
 
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Five dollars
(United States)
Value$5
Width155.956 mm
Height66.294 mm
WeightApprox. 1 g
Paper type75% cotton
25% linen
Obverse
New five dollar bill.jpg
DesignAbraham Lincoln
Design date2006
Reverse
Series2006 NoteBack 5.jpg
DesignLincoln Memorial
Design date2006

The United States five-dollar bill ($5) is a denomination of United States currency. The current $5 bill features the 16th U.S. President (1861–65), Abraham Lincoln's portrait on the front and the Lincoln Memorial on the back. All $5 bills issued today are Federal Reserve Notes. Five dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in red straps of 100 bills each.

The $5 bill is sometimes nicknamed a "fin". The term has German/Yiddish roots and is remotely related to the English "five", but it is far less common today than it was in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the average life of a $5 bill in circulation is 3.8 years before it is replaced due to wear.[1] Approximately 6% of all paper currency produced by the U.S. Treasury's Bureau of Engraving and Printing in 2009 were $5 bills.[2]

21st century design[edit]

Mathew Brady portrait of Lincoln taken on February 9, 1864, used for the $5 bill from 1928 to 1995.This photo was also used for the large sized five dollar bills from 1914 to 1928

The redesigned $5 bill was unveiled on September 20, 2007, and was issued on March 13, 2008 during a ceremony at President Lincoln's Cottage. New and enhanced security features make it easier to check the new $5 bill and more difficult for potential counterfeiters to reproduce. The redesigned $5 bill has:

Design features[edit]

The new $10 bills remain the same size and use the same—but enhanced—portraits and historical images. The most noticeable difference is the light-purple coloring of the center of the bill, which blends into gray near the edges.

Similar to the recently redesigned $10, $20 and $50 bills, the new $5 bill features an American symbol of freedom printed in the background: The Great Seal of the United States, featuring an eagle and shield, is printed in purple to the right of the portrait and an arc of purple stars surround both it and the portrait.

When the Lincoln Memorial was constructed the names of 48 states were engraved on it. The picture of the Lincoln Memorial on the $5 bill only contains the names of 26 states. These are the 26 states that can be seen on the front side of the Lincoln memorial which is what is pictured on the $5 bill..

Additional design elements[edit]

Other features[edit]

Large size note history[edit]

1862 $5 Legal Tender note
1880 $5 Legal Tender
1891 $5 Silver Certificate depicting Ulysses S. Grant.
1896 $5 Silver Certificate from the ”Educational Series”.

(approximately 7.4218 × 3.125 in ≅ 189 × 79 mm)

Small size note history[edit]

(6.14 × 2.61 in ≅ 156 × 66 mm)

The first small-size $5 United States Note printed (Smithsonian).
The first 1953 $5 Silver Certificate printed (Smithsonian)

Reverse[edit]

The reverse of the five-dollar bill has two rectangular strips that are blanked out when viewed in the infrared spectrum, as seen in this image taken by an infrared camera

The back of the five-dollar bill features sections of the bill that are blanked out when viewed in the infrared spectrum. This is consistent with other high-value US bills ($5 and up), which all feature patterns of infrared-visible stripes unique to the given denomination. Bills of other world currencies, such as the Euro, also feature unique patterns visible only when viewed in this spectrum.

See also[edit]

Where's George? marked five-dollar bill

References[edit]

  1. ^ "How long is the life span of U.S. paper money?". Federal Reserve. 
  2. ^ "Money Facts". Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 
  3. ^ "Newmoney.gov - The Redesigned $5 Note". US Treasury. 

External links[edit]