United States fifty-dollar bill

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Fifty dollars
(United States)
Value$50
Width155.956 mm
Height66.294 mm
WeightApprox. 1 g
Security featuresWatermark, Security thread, EURion constellation, Color-shifting ink, Micro-printing
Paper type75% cotton
25% linen
Years of printing1861–present (Small size)
Obverse
50 USD Series 2004 Note Front.jpg
DesignUlysses S. Grant
Design date2004
Reverse
50 USD Series 2004 Note Back.jpg
DesignUnited States Capitol
Design date2004
 
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Fifty dollars
(United States)
Value$50
Width155.956 mm
Height66.294 mm
WeightApprox. 1 g
Security featuresWatermark, Security thread, EURion constellation, Color-shifting ink, Micro-printing
Paper type75% cotton
25% linen
Years of printing1861–present (Small size)
Obverse
50 USD Series 2004 Note Front.jpg
DesignUlysses S. Grant
Design date2004
Reverse
50 USD Series 2004 Note Back.jpg
DesignUnited States Capitol
Design date2004
1862 $50 Legal Tender note
1880 $50 Legal Tender, depicting Benjamin Franklin
1891 Silver Certificate
1914 Federal Reserve Note

The United States fifty-dollar bill ($50) is a denomination of United States currency. The 18th U.S. President (1869–77), Ulysses S. Grant, is featured on the obverse, while the U.S. Capitol is featured on the reverse. All current-issue $50 bills are Federal Reserve Notes.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the average life of a $50 bill in circulation is 55 months before it is replaced due to wear. Approximately 6% of all notes printed in 2009 were $50 bills.[1] They are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in brown straps.

A fifty dollar bill is sometimes called a Grant, based on the use of Ulysses S. Grant's portrait on the bill.[citation needed]

Large size note history[edit]

(approximately 7.4218 × 3.125 in ≅ 189 × 79 mm)

Small size note history[edit]

(6.14 × 2.61 in ≅ 156 × 66 mm)

Proposals to honor Reagan[edit]

In 2005, a proposal to put Ronald Reagan on the $50 bill was put forward, but never went beyond the House Financial Services Committee, even though Republicans controlled the House. In 2010, North Carolina Republican Patrick McHenry introduced another bill to put Reagan's picture on the $50 bill.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Money Facts". Bureau of Engraving and Printing. 
  2. ^ Simon, Richard (2010-03-03). "Proposal would put Ronald Reagan's face on the $50 bill". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-03-03. 

External links[edit]