United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2010

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The 2010 congressional elections in North Carolina were held on November 2, 2010, to determine who would represent the state of North Carolina in the United States House of Representatives. Primary elections, where needed, were held on May 4, and the second primaries, where needed, followed on June 22. Representatives are elected for two-year terms; those elected are serving in the 112th Congress from January 2011 until January 2013.

This was the last election based on apportionments of the 2000 United States Census, which gave North Carolina thirteen seats in the House. Districts for the 2012 elections will be based on the 2010 United States Census.

Overview[edit]

United States House of Representatives elections in North Carolina, 2010[1]
PartyVotesPercentageSeats BeforeSeats After+/–
Republican1,440,91354.1%56+1
Democratic1,204,63545.2%87-1
Libertarian16,5620.62%000
Write-In4390.01%000
Totals2,662,549100.00%1313

Congressional districts[edit]

District 1[edit]

NC-Congress-1.PNG

Both the Democratic and Republican parties had primary elections. The Democratic primary featured incumbent Representative G.K. Butterfield facing business owner Chad Larkins.[2] G.K. Butterfield won the Democratic nomination with 72.93% of the vote.

There was a four-way race for the Republican nomination including family-owned insurance company executive Ashley Woolard, paramedic Jim Miller, assistant pastor and ethics instructor Jerry Grimes, and part-time sales associate John Carter.[3][4] Ashley Woolard won the Republican nomination with 45.24% of the vote.

In the general election, Democratic incumbent G.K. Butterfield defeated Republican nominee Ashley Woolard.

Campaign Finance[edit]

Through December 31, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[5]

Candidate (party)ReceiptsDisbursementsCash on handDebt
G.K. Butterfield (D)$828,117$794,383$173,416$0
Chad Larkins (D)$450$0$450$0
Ashley Woolard (R)$134,394$134,387$5$6,700
Jerry Grimes (R)$13,391$12,396$0$0

Results[edit]

US House of Representatives 1st District Democratic Primary Election 2010[6]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticG.K. Butterfield46,50972.93%
DemocraticChad Larkins17,26227.07%
Totals63,771100.00%
US House of Representatives 1st District Republican Primary Election 2010[7]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanAshley Woolard3,77445.24%
RepublicanJerry Grimes2,22026.61%
RepublicanJim Miller1,25215.01%
RepublicanJohn Carter1,09713.15%
Totals8,343100.00%
US House of Representatives 1st District General Election 2010[8]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticG.K. Butterfield103,29459.31%
RepublicanAshley Woolard70,86740.69%
Totals174,161100.00%

District 2[edit]

NC-Congress-2.PNG

In the primaries, no one filed to challenge incumbent Bob Etheridge, who ran for an eighth term, on the Democratic side and the Libertarian Party nominee Tom Rose had no primary either. The Republican primary, however, featured a three-way race between retired businessman Frank Deatrich, nurse Renee Ellmers and auto dealer Todd Gailas.[9] Renee Ellmers won the primary with 55.11% of the vote.

The general election race heated up after the primaries when Renee Ellmers received an endorsement from Sarah Palin and Bob Etheridge was caught on camera man-handling some bloggers who asked him a question and would not identify themselves.[10] This district proved to be the closest race in the state on Election Day. On November 12, 2010, the State Board of Elections reported that Ellmers had defeated Etheridge by 1,489 votes out of 189,800 votes cast in the race. That was a narrower margin than the first results reported on the night of the election, and was within the margin that allowed Etheridge to ask for a recount.[11] After the recount was complete and showed little change in the vote count, Etheridge conceded to Ellmers.[12]

Polling[edit]

Poll sourceDates administeredBob Etheridge (D)Renee Ellmers (R)Tom Rose (L)Undecided
SurveyUSAOctober 21–24, 201041%45%
Civitas InstituteJune 15–16, 201038%39%13%11%

Campaign Finance[edit]

Through December 31, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[5]

Candidate (party)ReceiptsDisbursementsCash on handDebt
Renee Ellmers (R)$1,139,876$908,108$231,768$40,227
Todd Gailas (R)$2,140$959$1,181$515
Bob Etheridge (D)$1,414,630$1,904,688$226,357$28,750

Results[edit]

US House of Representatives 2nd District Republican Primary Election 2010[13]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRenee Ellmers9,17155.11%
RepublicanFrank Deatrich4,28025.72%
RepublicanTodd Gailas3,19019.17%
Totals16,641100.00%
US House of Representatives 2nd District General Election 2010[14]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanRenee Ellmers93,87649.47%
DemocraticBob Etheridge92,39348.69%
LibertarianTom Rose3,5051.85%
Totals189,774100.00%

District 3[edit]

NC-Congress-3.PNG

In the Republican primary, long-time incumbent Representative Walter B. Jones faced retired Marine and Crystal Coast Tea Party founder Bob Cavanaugh along with third-time candidate and former Democrat Craig Weber.[15] Jones won the nomination with 76.88% of the vote.

Both the Democratic and Libertarian party candidates went on to the general election without facing any primaries.[15]

In the general election, Republican Walter B. Jones faced Democratic political consultant and patient services representative Johnny G. Rouse and Libertarian software developer Darryl Holloman.[16] Jones kept his seat by winning with 71.86% of the vote.

Although Democrats had a 14-point plurality of registered voters, Jones had long been thought to have an unbreakable hold on this district. Much of this area had been part of the 1st prior to 1993, and Jones's father, popular 14-term Democrat Walter Jones, Sr., is still an icon in this region. The district had a CPVI of R+15—a three-way statistical tie for the most Republican district in the state.[citation needed]

Campaign Finance[edit]

Through December 31, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[5]

Candidate (party)ReceiptsDisbursementsCash on handDebt
Walter B. Jones (R)$672,357$577,215$127,699$0
Craig Weber (R)$2,181$2,181$217$0
Johnny Rouse (D)$10,588$11,071$-547$0
Darryl Holloman (L)$355$238$117$0

Results[edit]

US House of Representatives 3rd District Republican Primary Election 2010[17]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanWalter B. Jones21,55176.88%
RepublicanBob Cavanaugh4,22115.06%
RepublicanCraig Weber2,2618.07%
Totals28,033100.00%
US House of Representatives 3rd District General Election 2010[18]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanWalter B. Jones143,22571.86%
DemocraticJohnny G. Rouse51,31725.75%
LibertarianDarryl Holloman4,7622.39%
Totals199,304100.00%

District 4[edit]

NC-Congress-4.PNG

Incumbent Democrat David Price did not face any opposition in the Democratic primary. He went on to face the winner of the four-way race for the Republican nomination which featured businessman David Burnett, Gulf War veteran George Hutchins, physician and software entrepreneur B.J. Lawson, and former currency trader executive Frank Roche.[19] B.J. Lawson won the primary with 45.99% of the vote.

David Price faced B.J. Lawson in the general election which was a re-match of their 2008 campaigns.[20] The election also made headlines when the Lawson campaign released an ad that claimed to use Morgan Freeman's voice-over when it actually had not. The Lawson campaign withdrew the ad saying they were misled by M.E.I. Political who produced the ad.[21] David Price won the election with 57.16% of the vote.

Price has represented the district since 1997 and from 1987 to 1995. Despite a CPVI of only D+5, the influence of the state's three major research universities plus Price's status as an Appropriations subcommittee chairman (or "Cardinal") made Price a heavy favorite.

Campaign Finance[edit]

Through December 31, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[5]

Candidate (party)ReceiptsDisbursementsCash on handDebt
David Price (D)$994,557$1,335,750$10,094$0
B.J. Lawson (R)$472,914$474,716$652$20,000
David Burnett (R)$12,883$12,640$243$0
George Hutchins (R)$47,886$57,888$0$0
Frank Roche (R)$123,711$123,711$0$0


Results[edit]

US House of Representatives 4th District Republican Primary Election 2010[22]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanWilliam (B.J.) Lawson10,44945.99%
RepublicanFrank Roche9,22840.61%
RepublicanDavid Burnett1,9678.66%
RepublicanGeorge Hutchins1,0774.74%
Totals22,721100.00%
US House of Representatives 4th District General Election 2010[23]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticDavid Price155,38457.16%
RepublicanWilliam (B. J.) Lawson116,44842.84%
Totals271,832100.00%

District 5[edit]

NC-Congress-5.PNG

Incumbent Republican Virginia Foxx faced a challenge in the Republican primary from medical-practice management business owner Keith Gardner.[24] Foxx won the primary with 79.84% of the vote.

In the general election, Foxx went on to face Democratic Party nominee Billy Kennedy, a farmer and radio host from Watauga County, who did not face any primary challenge.[25] Foxx defeated Kennedy with 65.89% of the vote.

Campaign finance[edit]

Through December 31, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[5]

Candidate (party)ReceiptsDisbursementsCash on handDebt
Virginia Foxx (R)$853,579$575,301$1,204,438$0
Billy Kennedy (D)$332,361$322,140$10,221$4,800

Results[edit]

US House of Representatives 5th District Republican Primary Election 2010[26]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanVirginia Foxx38,17479.84%
RepublicanKeith Gardner9,63920.16%
Totals47,813100.00%
US House of Representatives 5th District General Election 2010[27]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanVirginia Fox140,52565.89%
DemocraticBilly Kennedy72,76234.11%
Totals213,287100.00%

District 6[edit]

NC-Congress-6.PNG

In his first primary challenge since elected to the House in 1984, incumbent Republican Howard Coble faced a crowded field of primary challengers including Cathy Brewer Hinson, Jon Mangin, Jeff Philips, James Taylor, and Billy Yow. Except for Yow, who is a county commissioner, all the other challengers were political outsiders and range in age from 25 to 78. Coble won the primary with about 64% of the vote.[28] Coble defeated his general election opponent, Democrat Sam Turner, with relative ease.[29]

Campaign finance[edit]

Through December 31, 2010. Source: Federal Election Commission[5]

Candidate (party)ReceiptsDisbursementsCash on handDebt
Howard Coble (R)$503,434$925,991$181,092$0
Jon Mangin (R)$8,090$8,058$30$0
Jeff Phillips (R)$8,648$9,019$-370$7,945
James Taylor (R)$122,990$120,110$2,880$77,000
Billy Yow (R)$64,471$64,370$101$1,740
Sam Turner (D)$3,775$3,722$0$0

Results[edit]

US House of Representatives 6th District Republican Primary Election 2010[30]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanHoward Coble31,66363.48%
RepublicanBilly Yow7,92915.90%
RepublicanJames Taylor7,55315.14%
RepublicanCathy Brewer Hinson1,4682.94%
RepublicanJeff Phillips1,0952.20%
RepublicanJon Mangin1680.34%
Totals49,876100.00%
US House of Representatives 6th District General Election 2010[31]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanHoward Coble156,25275.21%
DemocraticSam Turner51,50724.79%
Totals207,759100.00%

District 7[edit]

NC-Congress-7.PNG

Democratic incumbent Mike McIntyre defeated Republican nominee Ilario Pantano.[32]

In 2008, McIntyre won re-election with 53.68% of the vote, despite the fact that his district is conservative leaning. He has represented the district since 1997.

Polling[edit]

Poll SourceDates AdministeredMike McIntyre (D)Ilario Pantano (R)Undecided
Grove InsightOctober 3–5, 201052%41%
SurveyUSASeptember 24–26, 201045%46%
Public Opinion StrategiesAugust 31 – September 2, 201041%48%

Results[edit]

US House of Representatives 7th District Republican Primary Election 2010[33]
PartyCandidateVotes%
RepublicanIlario Gregory Pantano17,17751.02%
RepublicanWill Breazeale11,62934.54%
RepublicanRandy Crow4,86214.44%
Totals33,668100.00%
US House of Representatives 7th District General Election 2010[34]
PartyCandidateVotes%
DemocraticMike McIntyre113,95753.68%
RepublicanIlario Gregory Pantano98,32846.32%
Totals212,285100.00%

District 8[edit]

NC-Congress-8.PNG

Democratic incumbent Larry Kissell defeated Republican nominee and retired TV sportscaster Harold Johnson.

Johnson defeated Tim D'Annunzio, retired Army Colonel Lou Huddleston, and others in a Republican primary that went to a second round.

Polling[edit]

Poll SourceDates AdministeredLarry Kissell (D)Harold Johnson (R)
Survey USAOctober 1–3, 201046%45%
Public Opinion StrategiesAugust 29–30, 201039%34%
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner ResearchAugust 25–29, 201048%36%
Anzalone Liszt ResearchAugust 19–24, 201049%32%
Public Policy PollingJune 10–13, 201041%35%
Public Policy PollingJanuary 9–11, 201053%39%

District 9[edit]

NC-Congress-9.PNG

Incumbent Republican Sue Myrick defeated Democrat Jeff Doctor. In 2008, she won re-election with 62% of the vote.

District 10[edit]

NC-Congress-10.PNG

Incumbent Patrick McHenry sought reelection.[35] Republicans Vance Patterson, David Boldon, and Iredell County Commissioner Scott Keadle announced they would run against McHenry in the primary.[36] The primary election was unusual in that McHenry was out-raised by not just one, but two of his opponents.[37] Despite being at a financial disadvantage, McHenry easily won the Republican primary on May 4 with 63% of the vote, while political newcomer Jeffrey Dale Gregory[citation needed] narrowly defeated 2004 Democratic nominee Anne Fischer[38] for the Democratic Party's nomination.[39] McHenry easily defeated Gregory.

District 11[edit]

NC-Congress-11.PNG

Democratic incumbent Heath Shuler defeated Republican nominee Jeff Miller (campaign site, PVS).

In 2008, Shuler faced Carl Mumpower and won with 62% of the vote despite the fact that the district is conservative leaning. Shuler was favored, since he did not face opposition from the man he defeated in 2006, former Rep. Charles H. Taylor.

Polling[edit]

Poll SourceDates AdministeredHeath Shuler (D)Jeff L. Miller (R)Undecided
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner ResearchOctober 17–19, 201054%39%
Greenberg Quinlan Rosner ResearchOctober 4–6, 201054%41%
SurveyUSAJuly 22–25, 201045%44%11%
Anzalone Liszt ResearchJuly 8–13, 201051%34%
Public Opinion StrategiesJune 1–3, 201046%34%18%

District 12[edit]

NC-Congress-12.PNG

Incumbent Mel Watt defeated Republican Greg Dority.

District 13[edit]

NC-Congress-13.PNG

Incumbent Democrat Brad Miller sought reelection.[40] Those vying for the opportunity to face Miller included Dan Huffman, a small business owner from Wake Forest; Bernie Reeves, a Raleigh publisher and political commentator; Bill Randall, a retired Navy meteorologist from Rolesville; and Frank Hurley, a retired engineer from Chapel Hill.[41] Randall defeated Reeves in a June 22 primary runoff.[42] Miller defeated Randall in the general election.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Office of the Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives
  2. ^ "Chad Larkins, Shaker native Running for Congress in NC". Call & Post; All Ohio Edition. Retrieved September 16, 2011. 
  3. ^ Clayborne, Jonathan (February 24, 2010). "Four running in District 1 GOP primary". Washington Daily News. Retrieved September 16, 2011. 
  4. ^ Clayborne, Jonathan (April 30, 2010). "Woolard is apparent front-runner in race". Washington Daily News. Retrieved September 16, 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f "Summary Reports Search Results – 2009–2010 Cycle". Federal Election Commission. Retrieved October 18, 2011. 
  6. ^ "NC 1st District Democratic Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  7. ^ "NC 1st District Republican Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  8. ^ "NC 1st District General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  9. ^ Phillips, Gregory (April 21, 2010). "GOP 2nd Congressional District candidates cite unique perspectives". Fayetteville Observer. Retrieved September 20, 2011. 
  10. ^ Cooper, Geoffrey (August 25, 2010). "Palin endorses Ellmers for U.S. House". Rocky Mount Telegram. Retrieved September 20, 2011. 
  11. ^ Robertson, Gary D. (November 12, 2010). "Ellmers lead slightly less in NC Congress race". The Daily Advance. Retrieved September 20, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Dem Rep. Etheridge Concedes to Renee Ellmers". CBS News Politics website. Retrieved September 20, 2011. 
  13. ^ "NC 2nd District Republican Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  14. ^ "NC 2nd District General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  15. ^ a b Hogwood, Ben (April 25, 2010). "Jones faces challengers in GOP race". Carteret News-Times. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  16. ^ Hogwood, Ben (October 20, 2010). "Jones faces challengers for Congressional seat". Carteret News-Times. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  17. ^ "NC 3rd District Republican Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  18. ^ "NC 3rd District General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved September 15, 2011. 
  19. ^ Biesecker, Michael (April 30, 2010). "Four vie to challenge Price". Raleigh News & Observer. Retrieved October 15, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Lawson gets set to face Price again". Raleigh News & Observer. May 5, 2010. Retrieved October 15, 2011. 
  21. ^ Biesecker, Michael (November 2, 2010). "Lawson campaign pulls 'Freeman' ad". Raleigh News & Observer. Retrieved October 15, 2011. 
  22. ^ "NC 4th District Republican Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  23. ^ "NC 4th District General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 14, 2011. 
  24. ^ Reagan, Jason (February 24, 2010). "Gardner plants GOP challenge for Foxx". Watauga Democrat. Retrieved October 16, 2011. 
  25. ^ Burchette, Linda. "Foxx, Kennedy to square off in forum". Jefferson Post. Retrieved October 16, 2011. 
  26. ^ "NC 5th District Republican Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 16, 2011. 
  27. ^ "NC 5th District General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 16, 2011. 
  28. ^ John Krahnert III (May 5, 2010). "Coble Holds Off Challengers in GOP Primary". The Pilot. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 
  29. ^ "Sam Turner for US Congress | Home | NC 6th Congressional District". Samturnerforcongress.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  30. ^ "NC 6th District Republican Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 24, 2011. 
  31. ^ "NC 6th District General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 16, 2011. 
  32. ^ Cadei, Emily (July 28, 2009). "McIntyre Out of North Carolina Senate Race – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  33. ^ "NC 7th District Republican Primary Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved November 24, 2011. 
  34. ^ "NC 7th District General Election Results 2010". NC State Board of Elections. Retrieved October 16, 2011. 
  35. ^ "Patrick McHenry: Campaign Finance/Money – Summary – Congressman 2010". OpenSecrets. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  36. ^ News-Herald: Candidates will challenge McHenry
  37. ^ McArdle, John (February 3, 2010). "Two GOP Challengers Have More Cash Than McHenry – The Eye (CQ Politics)". Blogs.cqpolitics.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. [dead link]
  38. ^ [1][dead link]
  39. ^ Shelby Star: McHenry leads the way for Republicans in 10th Congressional district
  40. ^ "Southern Political Report". Southern Political Report. December 22, 2008. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  41. ^ "Randall to challenge Miller | newsobserver.com projects". Projects.newsobserver.com. Retrieved August 21, 2010. 
  42. ^ State Board of Elections – 2nd primary results

External links[edit]