UCLA Bruins men's basketball

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UCLA Bruins
2013–14 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team
UCLA Bruins athletic logo
UniversityUniversity of California, Los Angeles
ConferencePac-12
LocationLos Angeles, CA
Head coachSteve Alford (1st year)
ArenaPauley Pavilion
(Capacity: 13,800)
NicknameBruins
Student sectionThe Den
Colors

True Blue and Gold

            
Uniforms
Kit body thinsidesonwhite.png
Home jersey
Kit shorts blanksides2.png
Team colours
Home
Kit body thinyellowsides.png
Away jersey
Kit shorts yellowsides.png
Team colours
Away
NCAA Tournament champions
1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1995
NCAA Tournament runner up
1980, 2006
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1962, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1980*, 1995, 2006, 2007, 2008
NCAA Tournament appearances
1950, 1952, 1956, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980*, 1981, 1983, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999*, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013
Conference tournament champions
1987, 2006, 2008
Conference regular season champions
1921, 1922, 1923, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1945, 1950, 1952, 1956, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1983, 1987, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2013
 
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UCLA Bruins
2013–14 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team
UCLA Bruins athletic logo
UniversityUniversity of California, Los Angeles
ConferencePac-12
LocationLos Angeles, CA
Head coachSteve Alford (1st year)
ArenaPauley Pavilion
(Capacity: 13,800)
NicknameBruins
Student sectionThe Den
Colors

True Blue and Gold

            
Uniforms
Kit body thinsidesonwhite.png
Home jersey
Kit shorts blanksides2.png
Team colours
Home
Kit body thinyellowsides.png
Away jersey
Kit shorts yellowsides.png
Team colours
Away
NCAA Tournament champions
1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1995
NCAA Tournament runner up
1980, 2006
NCAA Tournament Final Four
1962, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1980*, 1995, 2006, 2007, 2008
NCAA Tournament appearances
1950, 1952, 1956, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980*, 1981, 1983, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999*, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013
Conference tournament champions
1987, 2006, 2008
Conference regular season champions
1921, 1922, 1923, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1945, 1950, 1952, 1956, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1983, 1987, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2013
John Wooden coached 10 national championships.
Alcindor (Abdul-Jabbar) with the reverse two hand dunk.
Bill Walton taking a shot.
UCLA Bruins vs. Oregon State Beavers, January 2013, in the "New Pauley Pavilion"
Russell Westbrook and Kevin Love at a USC game

The UCLA Bruins men's basketball program, established in 1920, owns a record 11 Division I NCAA championships. UCLA teams coached by John Wooden won 10 national titles in 12 seasons from 1964 to 1975, including 7 straight from 1967 to 1973. UCLA went undefeated a record 4 times, in 1964, 1967, 1972, and 1973. Coach Jim Harrick led the team to another NCAA title in 1995. Former coach Ben Howland led UCLA to three consecutive Final Four appearances from 2006–2008.[1] On March 30, 2013, Steve Alford was named the school's 13th head men's basketball coach.[2]

NCAA records[edit]

UCLA men's basketball has set several NCAA records.[3] [4] [5]


* Excludes 1980 tournament results vacated by NCAA

Season-by-season results[edit]

SeasonCoachOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Fred W. Cozens (1919–1921)
1919–20Fred Cozens12–2
1920–21Fred Cozens9–29–01
Fred Cozens:21–49–0
Pierce "Caddy" Works (1921–1939)
1921–22Caddy Works9–19–11
1922–23Caddy Works12–49–11
1923–24Caddy Works8–28–22
1924–25Caddy Works11–69–11
1925–26Caddy Works14–210–01
1926–27Caddy Works12–49–11
1927–28Caddy Works10–55–4
1928–29Caddy Works7–91–8
1929–30Caddy Works14–83–6
1930–31Caddy Works9–64–53 (South)
1931–32Caddy Works9–104–73 (South)
1932–33Caddy Works10–111–104 (South)
1933–34Caddy Works10–132–104 (South)
1934–35Caddy Works11–124–83 (South)
1935–36Caddy Works10–132–104 (South)
1936–37Caddy Works6–142–104 (South)
1937–38Caddy Works4–200–124 (South)
1938–39Caddy Works7–200–124 (South)
Caddy Works:173–15982–108
Wilbur Johns (1939–1948)
1939–40Wilbur Johns8–173–94 (South)
1940–41Wilbur Johns6–202–104 (South)
1941–42Wilbur Johns5–182–104 (South)
1942–43Wilbur Johns14–74–42 (South)
1943–44Wilbur Johns10–103–32 (South)
1944–45Wilbur Johns11–123–11 (South)
1945–46Wilbur Johns8–165–73 (South)
1946–47Wilbur Johns18–79–31 (South)
1947–48Wilbur Johns12–133–93 (South)
Wilbur Johns:93–12034–56
John Wooden (1948–1975)
1948–49John Wooden22–710–21 (South)
1949–50John Wooden24–710–21 (PCC Champion)NCAA Regional 4th Place
1950–51John Wooden19–109–41 (South)
1951–52John Wooden19–128–41 (South)NCAA Regional 4th Place
1952–53John Wooden16–86–63 (South)
1953–54John Wooden18–77–52 (South)
1954–55John Wooden21–511–11 (South)
1955–56John Wooden22–616–01 (PCC Champion)NCAA Regional 3rd Place
1956–57John Wooden22–413–32
1957–58John Wooden16–1010–63
1958–59John Wooden16–910–63
1959–60John Wooden14–127–52
1960–61John Wooden18–87–52
1961–62John Wooden18–1110–21NCAA Fourth Place
1962–63John Wooden20–98–51NCAA Regional 3rd Place
1963–64John Wooden30–015–01NCAA Champion
1964–65John Wooden28–214–01NCAA Champion
1965–66John Wooden18–810–42
1966–67John Wooden30–014–01NCAA Champion
1967–68John Wooden29–114–01NCAA Champion
1968–69John Wooden29–113–11NCAA Champion
1969–70John Wooden28–212–21NCAA Champion
1970–71John Wooden29–114–01NCAA Champion
1971–72John Wooden30–014–01NCAA Champion
1972–73John Wooden30–014–01NCAA Champion
1973–74John Wooden26–412–21NCAA Third Place
1974–75John Wooden28–312–21NCAA Champion
John Wooden:620–147316–67
Gene Bartow (1975–1977)
1975–76Gene Bartow28–413–11NCAA Third Place
1976–77Gene Bartow24–511–31NCAA Sweet Sixteen
Gene Bartow:52–924–4
Gary Cunningham (1977–1979)
1977–78Gary Cunningham25–314–01NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1978–79Gary Cunningham25–515–31NCAA Elite Eight
Gary Cunningham:50–829–3
Larry Brown (1979–1981)
1979–80Larry Brown22–1012–64NCAA Finals*
1980–81Larry Brown20–713–53NCAA Round of 32
Larry Brown:42–1725–11
Larry Farmer (1981–1984)
1981–82Larry Farmer21–614–42
1982–83Larry Farmer23–615–31NCAA Round of 32
1983–84Larry Farmer17–1110–84
Larry Farmer:61–2339–15
Walt Hazzard (1984–1988)
1984–85Walt Hazzard21–1212–63NIT Champion
1985–86Walt Hazzard15–149–94NIT First round
1986–87Walt Hazzard25–714–41NCAA Round of 32
1987–88Walt Hazzard16–1412–62
Walt Hazzard:77–4747–25
Jim Harrick (1988–1996)
1988–89Jim Harrick21–1013–53NCAA Round of 32
1989–90Jim Harrick22–1111–74NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1990–91Jim Harrick23–911–72NCAA Round of 64
1991–92Jim Harrick28–516–21NCAA Elite Eight
1992–93Jim Harrick22–1111–73NCAA Round of 32
1993–94Jim Harrick21–713–52NCAA Round of 64
1994–95Jim Harrick32–117–11NCAA Champion
1995–96Jim Harrick23–816–21NCAA Round of 64
Jim Harrick:192–62108–36
Steve Lavin (1996–2003)
1996–97Steve Lavin24–815–31NCAA Elite Eight
1997–98Steve Lavin24–912–63NCAA Sweet Sixteen
1998–99Steve Lavin22–912–63NCAA Round of 64*
1999–2000Steve Lavin21–1210–84NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2000–01Steve Lavin23–914–43NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2001–02Steve Lavin21–1211–76NCAA Sweet Sixteen
2002–03Steve Lavin10–196–126
Steve Lavin:145–7880–46
Ben Howland (2003–2013)
2003–04Ben Howland11–177–117
2004–05Ben Howland18–1111–73NCAA Round of 64
2005–06Ben Howland32–714–41NCAA Championship Game
2006–07Ben Howland30–615–31NCAA Final Four
2007–08Ben Howland35–416–21NCAA Final Four
2008–09Ben Howland26–913–52NCAA Round of 32
2009–10Ben Howland14–188–105
2010–11Ben Howland23-1113–52NCAA Round of 32
2011–12Ben Howland19-1411-76
2012–13Ben Howland25-1013-51NCAA Round of 64
Ben Howland:233–107121–59
Steve Alford (2013–present)
2013–14Steve Alford8–10–0
Steve Alford:8–10–0
Total:1797–776

      National champion         Conference regular season champion         Conference tournament champion
      Conference regular season and conference tournament champion       Conference division champion

Loss later forfeited by Oregon State. Loss later forfeited by California. *Runner-up finish in 1980 NCAA tournament later vacated due to use of ineligible players. Source: UCLA Bruins men's basketball history

Coaches[edit]

Pauley Pavilion, home court of the Bruins prior to the 2012 renovation

The team has had 12 head coaches in its history, and they have won 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Men's Division I Basketball Championships, the most of any school.[6] John Wooden won 10 national championships between 1964 and 1975, and Jim Harrick won the other in 1995. The New York Times wrote that Wooden "made UCLA the most successful team in college basketball."[7] After Wooden retired, the four coaches that succeeded him resigned, and the following three—Harrick included—were fired. The average tenure of those coaches after Wooden was four years.[8][a] Former coach Ben Howland, led the Bruins to three consecutive Final Four appearances from 2006 to 2008.[9]

By the numbers[edit]


* Excludes 1980 tournament results vacated by NCAA

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame[edit]

UCLA players[edit]

All individuals were (or will be) inducted as players unless otherwise noted.

UCLA coaches[edit]

All individuals were inducted as coaches, though not necessarily for their service at UCLA.

Notable players[edit]

Ed O'Bannon, a member of the 1995 Championship team, was player-of-the-year

The 13 players who have played on three NCAA Division I Championship basketball teams: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Sidney Wicks, Curtis Rowe, Lynn Shackelford, Larry Farmer, Henry Bibby, Steve Patterson, Kenny Heitz, Jon Chapman, John Ecker, Andy Hill, Terry Scholfield, and Bill Sweek.

UCLA became the first school to have a top winner in both basketball and football in the same year with Gary Beban winning the Heisman Trophy and Lew Alcindor (now Kareem Abdul-Jabbar) winning the U.S. Basketball Writers Association player of the year award in 1968.

UCLA has produced the most NBA Most Valuable Player Award winners, six of them by Abdul-Jabbar and one to Walton, who was Abdul-Jabbar's successor.[10] As of the 2013–14 NBA season, 83 former UCLA players have played in the NBA.[12][13][b][c]

Retired numbers[edit]

No.PlayerPos.Career
11Don BarksdaleF1946–47
25Gail GoodrichG1962-65
31Ed O'BannonPF1991-95
Reggie MillerSG1983-87
32Bill WaltonC1971-74
33Kareem Abdul-JabbarC1966–69
35Sidney WicksPF1968-71
42Walt HazzardG1961-64
52Jamaal WilkesSF1971-74
54Marques JohnsonSF1973-77

School records[edit]

Individual career[edit]

RecordPlayerTotalYearsRef
Most pointsMacLean, DonDon MacLean2,6081988–1992[18]
Highest scoring averageAbdul-Jabbar, KareemKareem Abdul-Jabbar26.41966–1969
Most reboundsWalton, BillBill Walton1,3701971–1974
Highest rebounding averageWalton, BillBill Walton15.71971–1974
Most assistsRichardson, PoohPooh Richardson8331985–1989

Team season records[edit]

RecordTotalYear
Field Goals Made11611968
Field Goals %55.51979
Free Throws Made6421956
1991
Free Throw %75.61979
3-pt. Field Goals Made2622009
3-pt. Field Goal %42.61989
Rebounds16701964
Assists6731974
Blocked Shots1992011

Conferences[edit]

YearsConferencesWin–LossPct.
1919–1920None
1920–1927Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC)63–6.913
1927–1959Pacific Coast Conference (PCC)
1959–1968Athletic Association of Western Universities (AAWU)99–21.825
1968–1978Pacific-8 Conference129–11.921
1978–2011Pacific-10 Conference365–166.687
2011–presentPacific-12 Conference

Record vs. Pac-12 opponents[edit]

The UCLA Bruins lead the all-time series vs. all other eleven Pac-12 opponents. No other Pac-12 leads the series against more than nine of its conference opponents.

OpponentWinsLossesPct.Streak
Arizona5237.584UCLA 3
Arizona St.6318.779UCLA 1
Cal134100.573Cal 1
Colorado61.857UCLA 2
Oregon8331.728ORE 4
Oregon St.8834.721UCLA 2
Stanford13791.601UCLA 3
USC133105.559UCLA 1
Utah64.600UCLA 2
Washington9242.687UCLA 3
Wash. St.10215.872WSU 1

Facilities[edit]

The men's basketball team played in the 2000 seat Men's Gym from 1932 to 1965. They played at other venues around Los Angeles including the Pan-Pacific Auditorium and Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena. In 1965, Pauley Pavilion was built on campus and has been the home of Bruin Basketball since that time. During the 2011-12 season, Pauley Pavilion underwent a complete renovation, both inside and out, earning it the nickname of "New Pauley." A new attendance record was set when 13,727 fans watched the Bruins defeating the Arizona Wildcats 74–69 on March 2, 2013.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ There were 28 seasons from 1975–76 to 2002–03 and 7 coaches, an average of 4 years. The Yahoo article said 3.9.
  2. ^ Includes players in the American Basketball Association (ABA), which merged with the NBA in 1976.
  3. ^ basketball-reference.com counts 79 players, but is missing Greg Foster, Corey Gaines, Brett Vroman. Foster, Gaines, and Vroman all transferred from UCLA to another school.[14][15][16][17] The UCLA Media Guide did not count Foster, Gaines, and John Vallely. The Media Guide listed Ray Young, but he is not included here since he did not play a game in the NBA.

References[edit]

  1. ^ UCLA Men's Basketball Team
  2. ^ UCLA Names Steve Alford Head Men's Basketball Coach, UCLABruins.com, March 30, 2013
  3. ^ http://www.ncaa.org/library/records/basketball/m_basketball_records_book/2006/2006_m_basketball_records.pdf
  4. ^ http://www.laalmanac.com/sports/sp10rda.htm
  5. ^ http://prweb.com/releases/2007/2/prweb504690.htm
  6. ^ "Top 10 Colleges to Produce NBA Pros". RealClearSports. June 21, 2011. Archived from the original on March 23, 2012. 
  7. ^ Litsky, Frank (March 18, 2003). "Formality Is Reality As U.C.L.A. Fires Lavin". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. 
  8. ^ Wetzel, Dan (March 29, 2006). "Westwood's new look". yahoo.com (Yahoo! Sports). Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. 
  9. ^ Dwyre, Bill (February 11, 2011). "Ben Howland keeps cool on the UCLA basketball hot seat". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 29, 2011. 
  10. ^ a b Steve Aschburner, School is often out when it comes to picking an MVP, NBA.com, March 25, 2011
  11. ^ a b c d UCLA's Miller Highlights Class Of 2012, Pac-12.org, April 2, 2012
  12. ^ "2013–14 UCLA Men's Basketball Media Guide". UCLA Athletic Department. 2013. pp. 139–142. Archived from the original on November 4, 2013. 
  13. ^ "NBA & ABA Players Who Attended University of California, Los Angeles". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved April 6, 2012. 
  14. ^ Finney, Ryan (2010). "2010–11 UCLA Men's Basketball Media Guide". UCLA Athletic Department. p. 108. Archived from the original on March 10, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Greg Foster NBA & ABA Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 26, 2012.
  16. ^ "Corey Gaines NBA & ABA Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 26, 2012.
  17. ^ "Brett Vroman NBA & ABA Statistics". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved March 26, 2012.
  18. ^ "UCLA Records from 2011–12 UCLA Men's Basketball Media Guide". UCLA Athletic Department. p. 80. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. 

External links[edit]