Ty Ty, Georgia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Ty Ty, Georgia
—  City  —
Location in Tift County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 31°28′17″N 83°38′56″W / 31.47139°N 83.64889°W / 31.47139; -83.64889Coordinates: 31°28′17″N 83°38′56″W / 31.47139°N 83.64889°W / 31.47139; -83.64889
CountryUnited States
StateGeorgia
CountyTift
Area
 • Total0.8 sq mi (2.1 km2)
 • Land0.8 sq mi (2.1 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation315 ft (96 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total716
 • Density895/sq mi (341/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code31795
Area code(s)229
FIPS code13-78100[1]
GNIS feature ID0333293[2]
 
Jump to: navigation, search
Ty Ty, Georgia
—  City  —
Location in Tift County and the state of Georgia
Coordinates: 31°28′17″N 83°38′56″W / 31.47139°N 83.64889°W / 31.47139; -83.64889Coordinates: 31°28′17″N 83°38′56″W / 31.47139°N 83.64889°W / 31.47139; -83.64889
CountryUnited States
StateGeorgia
CountyTift
Area
 • Total0.8 sq mi (2.1 km2)
 • Land0.8 sq mi (2.1 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation315 ft (96 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total716
 • Density895/sq mi (341/km2)
Time zoneEastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST)EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code31795
Area code(s)229
FIPS code13-78100[1]
GNIS feature ID0333293[2]

Ty Ty is a city in Tift County, Georgia, United States. The population was 716 at the 2000 census. Ty Ty is named from the trees that once lined Ty Ty Creek, which runs through the area. These Ironwood and Buckwheat trees are referred to as white and black titi trees.[3]

Contents

Geography

Ty Ty is located at 31°28′16″N 83°38′56″W / 31.47111°N 83.64889°W / 31.47111; -83.64889 (31.471106, -83.648859)[4].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.8 square miles (2.1 km2), all of it land.

Demographics

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 716 people, 265 households, and 193 families residing in the city. The population density was 897.1 people per square mile (345.6/km²). There were 289 housing units at an average density of 362.1 per square mile (139.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 63.41% White, 32.82% African American, 0.14% Asian, 2.93% from other races, and 0.70% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.63% of the population.

There were 265 households out of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.2% were married couples living together, 17.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.8% were non-families. 21.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the city the population was spread out with 27.5% under the age of 18, 10.8% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 18.4% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 89.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $27,721, and the median income for a family was $30,750. Males had a median income of $23,095 versus $19,821 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,608. About 13.2% of families and 16.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.5% of those under age 18 and 24.5% of those age 65 or over.

Notable residents

Ty Ty is the birthplace and home of Darby Cottle Veazey, a two-time All-American softball player and the only female athlete to have her number retired at Florida State University.[5] Cottle was named the USOC "Best Amateur Softball Player" in the nation in 1981[6] and later won the prestigious Broderick Award.[7]

Ty Ty was also the birthplace of Jim "Big Chief" Wetherington. The following is an excerpt from the Southern Gospel Music Hall of Fame:

One of Southern Gospel's all time great bass singers, James Wetherington is remembered as a man of class and dignity.

He began his career in the late 1940s singing with the Sunny South Quartet and then with the Melody Masters. In 1949, he became the bass singer for the Statesmen Quartet and it would be with that legendary group that his name would be forever etched.

When Wetherington joined the Statesmen, both Hovie Lister and Lee Roy Abernathy suggested he needed a nickname. Paying homage to his Indian heritage, Wetherington became "Big Chief" and a part of Southern Gospel history lore.

A key member of the Statesmen for 24 years, he continued to entertain and delight audiences till his death at the National Quartet Convention in 1973. "Big Chief" Wetherington set the standard by which all other bass singers are still judged.

Ty Ty is also home to Ty Ty First Baptist Church, a regional church which draws members from four counties and reaches across the state, country and world through missions going and giving. The Church is a member of the Georgia Baptist and Southern Baptist Conventions. The church is pastored by Rev. Jim Duggan, author of Jim's Gems. Rev. John Davis serves as Minister of Music and Rev. Brian Puckett as Minister to Students.

References

External links

Ty Ty First Baptist Church

Jim's Gems