Twerking

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Twerking (/ˈtwɜrkɪŋ/) is a type of dancing in which an individual, usually a female,[1] dances to popular music in a sexually provocative manner involving thrusting hip movements and a low squatting stance.[2] Though the term seems to be of uncertain origin with common assumptions suggesting it is a contraction of "footwork" and a portmanteau of the words "twist" and "jerk", there is evidence from ethnographic interviews in New Orleans that the term began as street language in New Orleans with the rise of the local hip-hop music known as Bounce.[3] Since the late 1990s, twerking was associated with Bounce music of the Dirty South and was disseminated via mainstream hip hop videos and popular video-sharing sites since the mid 2000s.

Background

Comparisons have been made with traditional African dances,[4] for instance the Mapouka from West Africa which was banned from Ivory Coast's television due to its suggestive nature.[5] Twerking can carry both gendered and racialized connotations.[6] In the United States, twerking was introduced into hip-hop culture by way of the New Orleans bounce music scene. In 1982 the twerk was first performed on live television in the Top of the Pops show by the group Haysi Fantayzee while performing their song John Wayne Is Big Leggy. In 1993, DJ Jubilee recorded the dance tune "Do The Jubilee All" in which he chanted, "Twerk baby, twerk baby, twerk, twerk, twerk."[7] The video for the song increased the popularity of twerking. In 1995 New Orleans-based rapper Cheeky Blakk recorded the song "Twerk Something!" a call-and-response dance song dedicated to twerking. In 1997 DJ Jubilee recorded "Get Ready, Ready" in which he encouraged listeners to "Twerk it!".

Entertainment industry

Twerking first received national recognition in the United States in the early 2000s, when the song "Whistle While You Twurk" (2000) by the hip hop duo Ying Yang Twins peaked at number 17 on the Billboard Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs component chart. It was later referenced in their later track "Say I Yi Yi" (2002), in which the lyrics "she got her hands up on her knees and her elbows on her thighs / she like to twerk and that's for certain I can tell that she fly" are heard. In her track "Check on It" (2005), recording artist Beyoncé Knowles sings "Dip it, pop it, twerk it, stop it, check on me tonight."[8]

In 2006, the song "Pop, Lock & Drop It" by rapper Huey reached number six on the US Billboard Hot 100. Also in 2006, the hit single "Sexy Back", by Justin Timberlake, featuring Timbaland, from the former's second studio album Futuresex/Lovesounds, featured Timbaland rapping the lyrics "Let me see what you're twerking with / Go ahead, be gone with it, Look at those hips". In 2011, a group of female dancers who call themselves the Twerk Team and have posted many videos of themselves twerking on YouTube, were mentioned during the song "Round of Applause" by Waka Flocka Flame featuring Drake, in the line "Bounce that ass, shake that ass like the Twerk Team".[4]

The 2012 single "Bandz A Make Her Dance" by Juicy J contains the lyric "Start twerking when she hear her song",[9] while French Montana questions the ability of a girl to twerk by asking "What you twerkin' with," in his respective 2012 single "Pop That", featuring fellow rappers Drake, Lil Wayne and Rick Ross.[10] The aforementioned songs, along with "Express Yourself" by Nicky Da B and Diplo, "Made twerking the most popular dance move since the Dougie".[11]

In April 2013, rapper Danny Brown released the song "Express Yourself", inspired by music producer Diplo's song of the same name. The song, produced by Trampy, features a fast-paced electronic beat and is a composition about the popular dance craze twerking.[12] Brown dedicated the song "to all the ladies that like to turn up and have fun," in which he raps "Toes on the wall and her ass in the air / And she twerk that thing like she ain't have a care".[13][14]

In June 2013, rapper Busta Rhymes released a Jamaican dancehall-inspired single "Twerk It" featuring Nicki Minaj, who has been featured on several other "twerking songs", including "Shakin' It 4 Daddy" by Robin Thicke, "Dance (A$$)" by Big Sean and "Clappers" by Wale. Minaj can be seen twerking in all four of the aforementioned songs' music videos. In August 2013, the song "Twerk", by Lil Twist, featuring Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber, was leaked online.[15]

In August 2013, Juicy J has announced via Twitter, that he would give out a $50,000 scholarship for the girl who can twerk the best. The competition is inspired by the track "Scholarship" on his third album Stay Trippy, which contains the lyric "Keep twerking baby, might earn you a scholarship."[16] Also in September, "Twerk" from the MTV VMA show was named the Top Television Word of the Year (Teleword) of the 2012-1013 TV season by the Global Language Monitor." In 2013, twerk was added to the Oxford Dictionary Online.[17] The dictionary said the word had been around for 20 years. The word was a runner-up in the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year 2013.[18]

Reaction

In 2013, 33 students from Scripps Ranch High School in San Diego, were suspended for using school equipment to make a twerking video on school grounds that was later uploaded to YouTube.[19][20] In August 2013, recording artist Miley Cyrus generated controversy following a sexually-provocative performance during the 2013 MTV Video Music Awards, in which Cyrus twerked during a medley of her track "We Can't Stop" and "Blurred Lines" and "Give It 2 U" by Robin Thicke.[21]

See also

References

  1. ^ Miller, Matt (2012). Bounce: Rap Music and Local Identity in New Orleans. Boston: Univ of Massachusetts Press. 
  2. ^ "Twerk: Definition of Twerk in Oxford Dictionary - American English (US)". Oxford English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Retrieved December 11, 2013. 
  3. ^ Levy, Megan (December 14, 2012). "Do you know how to twerk? (Or even what it is?)". The Age. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Morgan, Glennisha. "Could ‘Twerking’ Possibly Be a New Way to Stay Fit?". Frugivore Magazine. Retrieved April 12, 2013. 
  5. ^ "Dance Has Africans Shaking Behinds, and Heads", Norimitsu Orishi, The New York Times, May 28, 2000
  6. ^ Megan Anne Todd, 2009 Getting Krump: Reading Choreographies of Cultural Desire Through an Afro-diasporic Dance, Ph.D. dissertation, 2009 University of Arizona. Ann Arbor: ProQuest/UMI, 2009 3357286.
  7. ^ Sarig, Roni (2007). Third Coast: Outkast, Timbaland, and How Hip-Hop Became a Southern Thing. Da Capo. p. 260. ISBN 978-0-306-81647-5. 
  8. ^ "Beyoncé – Check on It Lyrics". Rap Genius. November 11, 2012. Retrieved September 21, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Juicy J – Bands A Make Her Dance (Remix 2) Lyrics". RapGenius. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  10. ^ "French Montana – Pop That Lyrics". RapGenius. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  11. ^ Weiss, Jeff (December 28, 2012). "2012: The Year We All Got Ratchet". MTV Hive. Retrieved January 8, 2013. 
  12. ^ Zeichner, Naomi (April 5, 2013). "Danny Brown, "#ExpressYourself" (Prod. by Trampy) MP3". The Fader. The Fader, Inc. Retrieved April 27, 2013. 
  13. ^ "XDannyXBrownX: https://t.co/oUhH6G3ir2". Twitter. April 4, 2013. Retrieved September 21, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Danny Brown – Express Yourself Lyrics". Rap Genius. August 1, 2013. Retrieved September 21, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber team up for new song called Twerk". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved September 9, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Twerk Hard and Earn a $50,000 College Scholarship Courtesy Of Juicy J". Time. August 29, 2013. Retrieved September 11, 2013. 
  17. ^ "'Twerk,' 'selfie' added to Oxford dictionary". Fox News Channel. Associated Press. August 28, 2013. Retrieved September 14, 2013. 
  18. ^ http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/nov/19/selfie-word-of-the-year-oed-olinguito-twerk
  19. ^ "San Diego high school students suspended over sexually suggestive 'twerking' dance video". Daily News. New York. May 2, 2013. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  20. ^ Butler, Bethonie (May 6, 2013). "Twerking: What is it, and why did it get high school students suspended?". The Washington Post. Retrieved June 25, 2013. 
  21. ^ Lauren Moraski (September 21, 2013). "Miley Cyrus' booty-shaking VMA performance gets quite the reaction". CBS News. CBS. Retrieved December 11, 2013. 

External links