True Detective (TV series)

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True Detective
True Detective 2014 Intertitle.jpg
Genre
Created byNic Pizzolatto
Written byNic Pizzolatto
Directed byCary Joji Fukunaga
Starring
Opening theme"Far from Any Road" by The Handsome Family
Composer(s)T Bone Burnett
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes8 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Producer(s)Carol Cuddy
Editor(s)
  • Alex Hall
  • Alfonso Gonçalves
  • Meg Reticker
Location(s)
CinematographyAdam Arkapaw
Running time60 minutes
Production company(s)
  • Anonymous Content
  • Parliament of Owls
  • Passenger
  • Neon Black
  • Lee Caplin / Picture Entertainment
Broadcast
Original channelHBO
Original runJanuary 12, 2014 (2014-01-12) – present
External links
Official website
 
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True Detective
True Detective 2014 Intertitle.jpg
Genre
Created byNic Pizzolatto
Written byNic Pizzolatto
Directed byCary Joji Fukunaga
Starring
Opening theme"Far from Any Road" by The Handsome Family
Composer(s)T Bone Burnett
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes8 (List of episodes)
Production
Executive producer(s)
Producer(s)Carol Cuddy
Editor(s)
  • Alex Hall
  • Alfonso Gonçalves
  • Meg Reticker
Location(s)
CinematographyAdam Arkapaw
Running time60 minutes
Production company(s)
  • Anonymous Content
  • Parliament of Owls
  • Passenger
  • Neon Black
  • Lee Caplin / Picture Entertainment
Broadcast
Original channelHBO
Original runJanuary 12, 2014 (2014-01-12) – present
External links
Official website

True Detective is an American television crime drama series on HBO created and written by Nic Pizzolatto, with the first season directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga. Season one stars Matthew McConaughey, Woody Harrelson (both executive producers of the series), Michelle Monaghan, Michael Potts, and Tory Kittles, and uses multiple timelines to trace two Louisiana State Police Criminal Investigations Division homicide detectives' hunt for a serial killer in Louisiana across seventeen years. The series premiered on January 12, 2014, and consisted of eight episodes which concluded on March 9, 2014. The series has received widespread critical acclaim.

Development and production[edit]

In April 2012, HBO picked up the series with an order of eight episodes. The series was created by Nic Pizzolatto, who wrote all the episodes, while all the first season episodes are directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga; both also serve as executive producers, with Pizzolatto as showrunner.[1] The series' title is a reference to the "true detective" genre of pulp fiction, particularly the 20th-century magazine True Detective.[2][3][4] Season one is set along the coastal plain of South Louisiana, where it was also filmed.[5]

Format[edit]

The series was pitched as an anthology format, with each season featuring a different cast of characters and story.[6]

Cast[edit]

Season 1[edit]

Main[edit]

Recurring[edit]

Season 2[edit]

Nic Pizzolatto stated that the second season will feature three new lead characters.[10] Pizzolatto also stated that the season will take place in California but will exclude Los Angeles in favor of a lesser-known region of the state.[11] While unconfirmed, the season is expected to contain eight episodes, with Pizzolatto again writing every episode; unlike the first season, each episode will be directed by a different director.[11] William Friedkin is in talks to direct some episodes.[12]

Episodes[edit]

SeasonEpisodesOriginally airedDVD and Blu-ray release dates
Season premiereSeason finaleRegion 1Region 2Region 4
18January 12, 2014 (2014-01-12)March 9, 2014 (2014-03-09)June 10, 2014 (2014-06-10)[13]June 9, 2014 (2014-06-09)[14]June 25, 2014 (2014-06-25)[15]
No.TitleDirected byWritten byOriginal air dateU.S. viewers
(millions)
1"The Long Bright Dark"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoJanuary 12, 2014 (2014-01-12)2.33[16]

Vermilion Parish, Louisiana, 1995. Detectives Martin Hart (Woody Harrelson) and Rustin Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) investigate the ritualistic murder of former prostitute Dora Kelly Lange, found in a still smoking field of burned crops, with a symbol painted on her back and wearing a "crown" of deer antlers, blindfolded and posed as if praying to a large solitary tree. Numerous twig latticeworks, like Cajun bird traps, are found with her body in and around the field. Cohle is convinced that this is not the killer's first victim, but Hart is skeptical. Cohle is a new addition to CID and his aloofness and mysterious background make the other detectives distrustful and hostile towards him, nearly leading to a fight with detective Geraci (Michael Harney). Their investigation brings up the case of Marie Fontenot, a little girl whose disappearance five years earlier was not investigated. Another report is brought up of a child who claimed to be chased through the woods by a "green-eared spaghetti monster." Hart invites Cohle over for dinner, unaware that it is Cohle's deceased daughter's birthday. Cohle reluctantly accepts, but, as a result of his alcoholism, turns up drunk. Hart and Cohle follow up on the Fontenot disappearance with a visit to Marie's uncle Danny. In a dilapidated playhouse, Cohle finds another twig latticework.


Seventeen years later, Cohle and Hart are interviewed separately, five days apart, about Dora Kelly Lange by detectives Thomas Papania (Tory Kittles) and Maynard Gilbough (Michael Potts). Hart and Cohle have not spoken since a falling-out in 2002. Cohle is shown a photograph of another girl whose body has been found posed in similar fashion to Lange. Papania and Gilbough want to know how the killer could have struck again if he was caught in 1995.
2"Seeing Things"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoJanuary 19, 2014 (2014-01-19)1.67[17]

In 1995, Cohle and Hart continue to investigate the murder of Dora Lange, and learn she was attending church prior to her disappearance. Cohle deduces that Hart is cheating on his wife, Maggie (Michelle Monaghan), with court reporter Lisa Tragnetti (Alexandra Daddario), creating friction between the two. Cohle is also experiencing hallucinatory synesthetic side effects to his drug consumption and is contemptuous of Reverend Billy Lee Tuttle's (Jay O. Sanders) lobbying for a special task force focusing on "anti-Christian crimes" to assist in the investigation. While buying drugs from a young prostitute, Cohle is pointed towards a remote "ranch" harboring runaway girls as prostitutes. They interview underage prostitute Beth (Lili Simmons), find Lange's diary and learn the location of the church, which was destroyed in a fire, and that Lange came under the influence of a man she called the "King in Yellow" in a place called "Carcosa." While searching through the wreckage of the church, they find a wall painting depicting the nightmarish image of a woman with deer antlers on her head.


In 2012, Papania and Gilbough continue their interviews of Cohle and Hart. Hart is divorced, and Cohle confides that his daughter died after being involved in a car accident, leading to the collapse of his marriage and the beginning of his addiction. To avoid prosecution for killing a meth user who had injected his own infant child with the drug, Cohle's superiors compelled him to be a "floating" drug undercover officer for four years, until he was hospitalized in a psychiatric institution after shooting three cartel members and being wounded in the gunfight. After his release, Cohle's request for another job resulted in his becoming a homicide detective with CID, where he was partnered with Hart.
3"The Locked Room"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoJanuary 26, 2014 (2014-01-26)1.93[18]

In 1995, Hart and Cohle locate the pastor of the burnt-down church, evangelist Joel Theriot (Shea Whigham), learning that Dora Lange was often seen with a tall man with facial scarring, and begin searching for him while being pressured to turn the case over to the task force. Hart begins to reconnect with Maggie despite her fascination with Cohle, and assaults Lisa's new boyfriend out of jealousy, questioning his own morality. Cohle goes through dead body files in search of cases similar to Lange and learns of Rianne Olivier, a supposed accidental death that shared elements with Lange's murder. They learn through Olivier's grandfather that she attended Light of Way Academy, a defunct religious school owned by Reverend Tuttle, before running off with her boyfriend Reggie Ledoux (Charles Halford). The detectives follow their lead to the school, where Cohle starts to interview a caretaker on a riding lawnmower. Before he can investigate further, Hart receives a records check that reveals that Ledoux has skipped parole and was a former cellmate of Lange's ex-husband, Charlie. They immediately head out to question Charlie Lange again. The episode closes with Hart and Cohle putting out an APB on Ledoux, while elsewhere a tall man wearing only underwear and a gas mask is seen wandering a remote bayou compound wielding a machete.


In 2012, the Papania and Gilbough interviews of Hart and Cohle identify their character flaws, particularly Hart's hypocritical views on morality and Cohle's nihilistic view of the world. Hart reflects that he is now divorced from Maggie.
4"Who Goes There"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoFebruary 9, 2014 (2014-02-09)1.99[19]

In 1995, Hart and Cohle interrogate Charlie Lange again for information about Ledoux, his former cellmate. Lange informs them that he showed pictures of Dora to Ledoux and identifies a known associate, Tyrone Weem, as a lead. Lange also tells the detectives that Ledoux told him about a group of rich men who would get together for "devil worship" involving sacrifices of women and children. Hart tracks down Weem at a warehouse rave and forces him to name the East Texas biker gang Ledoux is now cooking meth for, the Iron Crusaders. Cohle, who previously worked with the gang while undercover, takes "sick leave" to infiltrate the gang, giving the excuse that he needs to visit his dying father. Meanwhile, Lisa spitefully tells Maggie everything about her affair with Hart, who returns home to find his family gone and his bags packed. He tries to talk to Maggie at her workplace and is confronted by security officers before Cohle arrives to take him away. Cohle hits the Iron Crusaders hangout masquerading as former security for a Mexican cartel breaking away on his own, using high-grade cocaine taken from the police evidence room to back up his claim. He negotiates with his contact Ginger (Joseph Sikora) that if given a commitment to back a deal with the gang's meth producer, Cohle will help Ginger rob a stash house in the projects. Disguised as police, they rob the stash house, shooting one of the residents, and stir up the neighborhood's inhabitants in the process, resulting in an outbreak of gunfire and chaos. With the actual police on their way, Cohle holds Ginger at gunpoint as they escape the house and make their way through the projects. Cohle contacts Hart who collects them from the scene as the police arrive.


In 2012, doubts in the investigation start to come forth as Papania and Gilbough question Cohle's sick leave, claiming that there are no hospital records of his father. Cohle tells the detectives about his father while Hart feigns ignorance.
5"The Secret Fate of All Life"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoFebruary 16, 2014 (2014-02-16)2.25[20]

In 1995, Ginger and Cohle (still undercover) meet with DeWall Ledoux, Reggie's cousin and cook partner, in a roadside bar. DeWall refuses to do a drug deal with Cohle, but after DeWall leaves, Hart follows him. Hart radios his location to Cohle and the pair meet up near the hidden meth lab in the bayou, where Cohle leads the way through brush, avoiding hidden explosive booby traps rigged to kill unwary intruders. The pair descend on the house where Hart apprehends Reggie and handcuffs him. Cohle draws down on DeWall, who has just stepped out of the meth lab, as Hart is searching the premises, coming across two kidnapped and abused children, one of them dead. Enraged, Hart executes Reggie Ledoux with a shot to the head. DeWall panics and flees but is killed when he detonates one of the booby traps. Hart removes the handcuffs from the dead Ledoux, and Cohle sprays the yard with bullets from an AK to give the appearance that a shootout had taken place. In their 2012 interviews (voiced over the actual events) and later before a shooting board, the pair separately relate identical concocted stories of surviving a chaotic firefight in which Hart managed to kill Ledoux. Hart and Cohle are hailed back at the station and in the press as heroes, with both receiving commendations and promotions.


By 2002, Hart is reconciled with his wife and kids, while Cohle has a doctor girlfriend. Hart's daughter Audrey has begun acting out and tensions rise once again in the household. Cohle, a renowned interrogator, is brought in to get a confession out of a robber accused of murdering two people in a store while high on PCP. After confessing, the prisoner begs for a deal from Cohle, declaring that Ledoux wasn't the killer of the missing girls--the real killer was never caught and is still killing. He claims he himself met the "Yellow King," information withheld from the public in the Dora Lange case, and that people high up know about the killer. Cohle beats the man, demanding "a name," but is restrained by other detectives. He returns later with Hart to find that the prisoner has killed himself in his cell after receiving a phone call (purportedly from his lawyer) made from a public pay phone out in the middle of nowhere. Cohle returns to the abandoned religious school, where he finds dozens of stick sculptures, and drawings and black stars on the walls.


In 2012, Papania and Gilbough tell Hart that they suspect that Cohle, who they allege conveniently led Hart to every clue or lead in the case, has been behind the killings all along; Cohle has been spotted among the bystanders at the scene of the recent killing in Lake Charles that is similar to the Dora Lange case. Cohle has also been a person of interest in the suspicious death of Reverend Tuttle two years before. Cohle walks out of his interview after the detectives accuse him, ridiculing them to get a warrant, while Hart is asked in his interview to explain what exactly happened between him and Cohle in 2002.
6"Haunted Houses"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoFebruary 23, 2014 (2014-02-23)2.64[21]

In 2002, Cohle investigates on his own a series of old missing persons cases, linking the victims to the Tuttle schools. He seeks out Theriot, who has since quit the ministry and become a drunk, to ask about Wellspring, a defunct foundation that financed the rural schools while Theriot was a seminarian at the college Tuttle established. Theriot claims that Wellspring covered up child molestation scandals and implies that he was intimidated into silence after being questioned in 1995. Cohle tries to interview Kelly, Ledoux's surviving victim in 1995 and institutionalized with regressive catatonia, to ask her if a third man was involved with her abduction. She describes a giant man with scars, and begins screaming when Cohle asks about the man's face. Despite being ordered to stop his investigations, Cohle meets with Tuttle, ostensibly seeking the names of former Wellspring employees but actually fishing for reactions from him. Tuttle complains to the department, misrepresenting the nature of the meeting. Cohle cites this as proof of Tuttle's culpability, but is suspended from duty anyway. Hart runs into Beth, a former underage prostitute he interviewed during the Dora Lange investigation, and starts an affair with her. A suspicious Maggie checks Hart's cell and finds a picture of Beth. Maggie then goes to Cohle's apartment and seduces him; Cohle, disgusted and infuriated when she tells him she had sex to get rid of Hart, kicks her out. Maggie tells Hart anyway, who attacks Cohle in the department parking lot. Cohle quits immediately after.


In 2012, Papania and Gilbough interview Maggie, now remarried. She is scornful of their motives and denies that the divorce from Hart had anything to do with Cohle. Asked to characterize Cohle, she describes him as a good man with integrity. Hart abruptly walks out on his interview when Papania and Gilbrough again suggest that Cohle may have killed Tuttle in 2010 and been responsible for all the other murders. Cohle follows Hart and initiates their first contact since the fight. Cohle asks Hart to buy him a beer, saying they should talk, to which Hart agrees, but after Cohle turns away, arms himself with a revolver.
7"After You've Gone"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoMarch 2, 2014 (2014-03-02)2.34[22]
In 2012, Cohle prods a disinclined Hart to assist him in finding the man with the facial scars by reminding Hart that he, in addition to Cohle, owes a moral debt for what actually took place in 1995. He takes Hart to a self storage facility where he convinces him of the existence of a cult that mixes elements of the courir de Mardi Gras, santería and voudon in its rites and shows him evidence he has compiled linking Tuttle and possibly others in the disappearances of dozens of women and children going back to the 1980s. Cohle admits burgling Tuttle's homes to obtain proof of his complicity, including photographs and a videotape of the ritualistic sacrifice of Marie Fontenot years ago. However he denies killing Tuttle, speculating that others believed Tuttle was going to be blackmailed over the videotape and killed him to prevent it. Hart finds a Ledoux relative who confirms that Reggie and DeWall were connected to the man with scars, and locates a former domestic who worked for Tuttle's father Sam when they still lived in Vermilion Parish. She recalls a scarred boy who was one of Sam Tuttle's illegitimate grandchildren from his "other" family, named Childress. Hart also discovers that the Vermilion Parish deputy originally handling the Fontenot disappearance was Hart's old friend (and Cohle's antagonist) Steve Geraci, who concealed the fact in 1995 and has since gone on to become a parish sheriff. Feeling out Geraci, Hart concludes that a coverup of Marie Fontenot's abduction was engineered by then-Vermilion Parish Sheriff Ted Childress. Hart and Cohle kidnap Geraci to coerce the details from him. Meanwhile, Gilbough and Papania are lost trying to locate a rural church Cohle mentioned in his interview and ask directions from a caretaker on a riding lawnmower in a parish cemetery. Impressed by his local knowledge, Papania nonetheless fails to notice his badly scarred lower face before driving away. The man thinks aloud: "My family's been here a long, long time."
8"Form and Void"Cary Joji FukunagaNic PizzolattoMarch 9, 2014 (2014-03-09)3.52[23]
The scarred killer is shown in his home, a large, messy house. He lives and has sex with his mentally challenged half-sister, spouts his philosophies in a variety of voices and accents, and keeps his father in a shed out back which is covered in arcane paintings. His father is chained to a bed, gaunt and barely living with his mouth sewn shut. He is also shown painting a school building, where he watches two girls spinning in circles and uneasily makes eye contact with a young boy. Cohle and Hart interrogate Geraci, getting him to talk by showing him the cultists' tape of the Fontenot sacrifice. They learn that the sheriff at the time of Fontenot's disappearance was named Childress, and covered up her disappearance. They hit another dead end in the investigation, until Hart notes the significance of the Erath "spaghetti monster"'s green ears, and the possibility that the green may have come from paint. Searching through photos they took in 1995 while trying to find Marie Fontenot, they find one home that was painted green by a small business called "Childress and Son", which employed a man with scars on his face. Driving to the home of William Childress, the owner of the business, Cohle instinctively recognizes it as the home of their killer. Errol Childress, the scarred man, flees and is pursued by Cohle into a large overgrown labyrinthine structure in the woods - Carcosa. Hart bursts into the home and corners Childress' half-sister, and forces her to show him where their telephone is located, as there is no cell phone service in the area. In the innermost chamber of Carcosa, and after observing several dozen corpses in various states of decay, Cohle hallucinates (or really sees) a spiraling vortex on the ceiling, similar to the black spiral symbol used by the Tuttle family and their followers. Suddenly he is attacked by Childress, who stabs him in the stomach and lifts him off of the ground. Cohle manages to headbutt Errol, and in doing so frees himself. Hart arrives and shoots Errol, wounding him but not enough to keep the serial killer from throwing a hatchet into Hart's chest. As Errol is about to deliver a death blow to Hart with the hatchet, Cohle shoots Childress in the head, killing him. Papania and Gilbough, who were called to the scene by Hart, arrive with backup and find the half-sister handcuffed in the house, and Hart clinging to the unconscious, critically wounded Cohle, in Carcosa. After a long stay in the hospital, both men manage to recover from their wounds. The police have been able to find enough evidence to connect Errol to the murder of Dora Lange and dozens of others, including the modern day murders. However, they are unable to find anything linking Errol and Carcosa to the Tuttles, who escape prosecution. Hart and Cohle accept that they'll never catch the rest, but that they still got their man. Hart sees his whole family for the first time in years and breaks down in tears. Hart wheels Cohle out of the hospital one night and they talk in the parking lot. Cohle reveals that when he was comatose, he felt the presence of his daughter and father, and has come out of the experience with a significantly more hopeful outlook on life. Cohle describes a universal battle between light and dark. Based on the night sky, Hart notes that the dark has much more territory. Cohle responds, "Once there was only dark. You ask me, the light's winning." The two leave the hospital together.

Reception[edit]

Critical response[edit]

True Detective was highly acclaimed by critics. It holds an 84 percent "Certified Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes, with an average score of 8.4 out of 10, based on 60 reviews. The site's consensus states: "In True Detective, performances by Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey reel the viewer in, while the style, vision and direction make it hard to turn away."[24] On Metacritic, it has a rating of 87 out of 100 based on 41 reviews, indicating "Universal acclaim".[25]

David Wiegand of San Francisco Chronicle wrote "The dialogue is rich, colorful and provocative, adding to the gothic sensibilities of the series. Director Cary Joji Fukunaga makes great use of the Louisiana location, giving it as much importance to the story as the characters of Cohle and Hart. All the performances are superb, but those of McConaughey and Harrelson are in a class by themselves."[26] Robert Lloyd of the Los Angeles Times praised the series' format, writing "We are seeing the return of the miniseries, reborn out of the seasonal long arc of the 8-to-13-hour dramatic serial. With no hurry to get to the end, there is time for slow, detailed storytelling with lots of room for conversation and for silence."[27] Alan Sepinwall of HitFix praised the performances and dialogue, writing "The two central performances are so powerful, the dialogue so evocative, the look so intense, that they speak to the value of the hybrid anthology format Pizzolatto is using here—points to a potentially fascinating shift in dramatic series television."[28]

After the fourth episode aired, Christopher Orr of The Atlantic called the series "the best show on TV."[29] In particular, the six-minute long take featured at the end of the fourth episode received much critical praise.[30] Erik Adams of The A.V. Club wrote about the scene, "we might not see another sequence of such sustained tension on our TVs in 2014. This is the crowning achievement of Cary Fukunaga's True Detective direction thus far."[31] James Poniewozik of Time called it a "tour-de-force" and that "it was one of the most amazing scenes you're likely to see on TV all year."[32] Sean T. Collins of Rolling Stone wrote that the "climactic gunfight was the best TV action sequence since the 'Blackwater' episode of Game of Thrones."[33]

Ben Lawrence, writing for The Telegraph, praised True Detective for skillfully linking Louisiana's post-Katrina coastal landscape to its distinctive inhabitants. It then uses its characters to create "a fully realised sense of place, from the muscular proselytizing of its evangelists to the insularity of its bayou-dwellers". Matthew McConaughey is strangely alien stemming from being a Texan, being from a world outside the local Louisiana culture and thus creating "the off-kilter consequences of having a Texan in town."[34]

Marian St. Laurent wrote a speculative and interpretive analysis for Sensitive Skin Magazine, "America as Afterimage in True Detective," in which she argues that Marty represents the dying middle class, while Rust Cohle is his nocturnal opposite, a symbol of the deterioration and chaos of post-collapse America.[35]

Emily Nussbaum, writing for The New Yorker, praised the show's style, saying that True Detective "offers up shiver-inducing cable intoxicants, from an over-the-top action sequence so liquid it rivals a Scorsese flick to piquant scenes of rural degradation, filmed on location in Louisiana, a setting that has become a bit of an HBO specialty." Nussbaum panned what she describes as 'paper thin' female characters and the 'reek' of macho nonsense.[36]

Accolades[edit]

For the 30th TCA Awards, True Detective won for Outstanding Achievement in Movies, Miniseries, and Specials and received nominations for Outstanding New Program and Program of the Year; and Matthew McConaughey won for Outstanding Individual Achievement in Drama.[37] For the 4th Critics' Choice Television Awards, the series was nominated for Best Drama Series and Best Actor in a Drama Series (McConaughey), winning the latter.[38] For the 66th Primetime Emmy Awards, the series is nominated for Outstanding Drama Series, Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey are both nominated for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series, Nic Pizzolatto is nominated for Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series for "The Secret Fate of All Life", and Cary Joji Fukunaga is nominated for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series for "Who Goes There".[39]

Influences[edit]

In addition to being influenced and inspired by pulp detective fiction, True Detective incorporates elements and themes from the weird supernatural horror genre. This includes quotations from and direct references to Robert W. Chambers' classic 1895 book The King in Yellow and dialogue directly inspired by the works of modern-day cult horror author Thomas Ligotti. The series' writer and showrunner, Nic Pizzolatto, has acknowledged these influences in an interview given to The Wall Street Journal.[40] In the same article Pizzolatto recommends modern-day horror authors Karl Edward Wagner, Laird Barron, John Langan, Simon Strantzas and the recent anthology A Season in Carcosa. Pizzolatto also mentions as influences the nihilistic philosophies in the books Confessions of an Antinatalist by Jim Crawford, Nihil Unbound by Ray Brassier, In The Dust of This Planet by Eugene Thacker, and Better Never to Have Been by David Benatar. Wall Street Journal writer Michael Calia has offered some commentary and analysis on these influences,[41] as has the website io9.[42]

Interest in the Chambers connection resulted in The King in Yellow shooting up into Amazon.com's top ten bestseller list in February 2014.[43] There has also been some discussion of the influence of comic book writers Alan Moore and Grant Morrison on the plot and philosophy of the series, as analyzed by Sam Adams at Indiewire[44] as well as Adam and Mark Stewart at ComicsAlliance[45] initially stemming from a quote that Pizzolatto gave to The Courier-Journal in 2010.[46] Alan Moore's influence on Pizzolatto is evident in the striking similarity between the ending of True Detective season one and that of Moore's graphic novel, "Top 10".[47]

The show's director, Cary Fukunaga, also expressed interest in filmmaker David Lynch, and cited Lynch's process filming Twin Peaks as an influence.[48]

Home media release[edit]

On June 10, 2014, HBO Home Entertainment released the first season of True Detective in both DVD and Blu-ray Disc formats. Both formats include all eight episodes as well as bonus material such as exclusive interviews with Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson, a discussion between series creator Nic Pizzolatto and composer T Bone Burnett about the development of the show and the series' music, "Inside the Episode" featurettes, two audio commentaries, and deleted scenes from the season.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Andreeva, Nellie (April 30, 2012). "HBO Picks Up Matthew-Woody Series 'True Detective' With Eight-Episode Orders". Deadline.com. Retrieved February 2, 2013. 
  2. ^ Jensen, Jeff (January 12, 2014). "'True Detective' post-mortem: Unraveling the mysteries". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  3. ^ Smith, Russel (February 20, 2014). "Decoding the secrets of True Detective". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  4. ^ Seitz, Matt Zoller (January 10, 2014). "TV Review: HBO's True Detective". Vulture. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  5. ^ Walker, Dave (June 12, 2013). "HBO 'True Detective' teaser signals coming boom of New Orleans-shot TV". The Times-Picayune. Retrieved November 15, 2013. 
  6. ^ Goldberg, Lesley (April 30, 2013). "HBO Lands Matthew McConaughey, Woody Harrelson Cop Drama". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved September 9, 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d e Andreeva, Nellie (January 14, 2013). "'Texas Chainsaw's Alexandra Daddario, 'Twilight Saga's Elizabeth Reaser, 2 'Wire' Alums Join New HBO Series 'True Detective'". Deadline.com. Retrieved February 3, 2013. 
  8. ^ Andreeva, Nellie (February 1, 2013). "Kevin Dunn Joins HBO Series 'True Detective', CBS Pilot 'Mom' Adds Regular". Deadline.com. Retrieved February 3, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b c Levine, Stuart (January 30, 2013). "Simmons added to HBO's 'True Detective' cast". Variety. Retrieved February 3, 2013. 
  10. ^ Roots, Kimberly (May 27, 2014). "True Detective Creator: HBO Drama's Season 2 Will Feature Three Leads". TVLine. Retrieved May 27, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b Hibberd, James (May 27, 2014). "'True Detective' season 2 scoop: Trio of leads, California setting". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved May 27, 2014. 
  12. ^ Rife, Katie (July 10, 2014). "William Friedkin says he’s had meetings about directing True Detective". The A.V. Club. Retrieved July 10, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b Lambert, David (March 26, 2014). "True Detective - HBO Video's Official Press Release for 'The Complete 1st Season'". TVShowsOnDVD.com. Retrieved March 30, 2014. 
  14. ^ "True Detective - Season 1 [DVD]". Amazon.co.uk. Retrieved May 5, 2014. 
  15. ^ "True Detective: Season 1". Ezy DVD. Retrieved April 2, 2014. 
  16. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (January 14, 2014). "Sunday Cable Ratings: 'Real Housewives of Atlanta' Wins Night, 'True Detective', 'Ax Men', 'Shameless' & More". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved January 14, 2014. 
  17. ^ Bibel, Sara (January 22, 2014). "Sunday Cable Ratings: 'Real Housewives of Atlanta' Wins Night, 'Keeping Up With the Kardashians', 'Shameless', 'True Detective', 'Girls' & More". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved January 22, 2014. 
  18. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (January 28, 2014). "Sunday Cable Ratings: 'Real Housewives of Atlanta' Wins Night + 'Live From the Red Carpet', 'Curse of Oak Island', 'Sister Wives' & More". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved January 28, 2014. 
  19. ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (February 11, 2014). "Sunday Cable Ratings: 'The Walking Dead' Tops Night + 'Real Housewives of Atlanta', 'Keeping Up With the Kardashians' & More". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved February 11, 2014. 
  20. ^ Bibel, Sara (February 19, 2014). "Sunday Cable Ratings: 'The Walking Dead' Wins Night, NBA All Star Game, 'Real Housewives of Atlanta', 'True Detective', 'Shameless' & More". TV by the Numbers. Retrieved February 19, 2014. 
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