Troy, Alabama

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Troy
City
The downtown square in Troy.
Location in Pike County and the state of Alabama
Coordinates: 31°48′7″N 85°58′2″W / 31.80194°N 85.96722°W / 31.80194; -85.96722
CountryUnited States
StateAlabama
CountyPike
Founded1838
Incorporated1843
Government
 • TypeMayor-Council
 • MayorJason A. Reeves
Area
 • Total27.627 sq mi (71.55 km2)
 • Land27.5 sq mi (71.3 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.2 km2)
Elevation541 ft (165 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total18,033
 • Density529.8/sq mi (204.3/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes36079, 36081, 36082
Area code(s)334
FIPS code01-76920
GNIS feature ID0153725
Websitehttp://www.troyal.gov
 
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Troy
City
The downtown square in Troy.
Location in Pike County and the state of Alabama
Coordinates: 31°48′7″N 85°58′2″W / 31.80194°N 85.96722°W / 31.80194; -85.96722
CountryUnited States
StateAlabama
CountyPike
Founded1838
Incorporated1843
Government
 • TypeMayor-Council
 • MayorJason A. Reeves
Area
 • Total27.627 sq mi (71.55 km2)
 • Land27.5 sq mi (71.3 km2)
 • Water0.1 sq mi (0.2 km2)
Elevation541 ft (165 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total18,033
 • Density529.8/sq mi (204.3/km2)
Time zoneCentral (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST)CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes36079, 36081, 36082
Area code(s)334
FIPS code01-76920
GNIS feature ID0153725
Websitehttp://www.troyal.gov
IMG 0614.JPG

Troy is a city in Pike County, Alabama, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 18,033.[1] Troy experienced a growth spurt of over 4,000+ people since 2000. The city is the county seat of Pike County.[2]

Troy is a college town and is home to Troy University.

History[edit]

Geography[edit]

Troy is located at 31°48′7″N 85°58′2″W / 31.80194°N 85.96722°W / 31.80194; -85.96722 (31.801960, -85.967317)[3]. It is in the East Gulf Coastal Plains region of the Alabama. It is located along the Troy Cuesta ridge, which runs across the state from east to west and is the boundary that separates the Chunnenuggee Hills and Southern Red Hills geographical boundaries. Elevations commonly reach 400 feet (120 m) in these hills and can reach up to 500 feet (150 m) in some areas. About 40 miles (64 km) north of Troy near the Montgomery area, the Chunnenuggee Hills region ends and the flat "Black Prairie" region begins, commonly known as the Black Belt region. About 60 miles (97 km) south of Troy in the Dothan area, the Southern Red Hills region ends and the "Dougherty Plains" region begins. Map

Much of the region consists of pine forests. Most tree species found in the area are pine, hickory, oak, pecan, and populus. The 231-mile (372 km) long Conecuh River flows at the northern end of Troy. A 45-acre (180,000 m2) lake called Pike County Lake is located at the southern end of Troy.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 26.3 square miles (68 km2), of which, 26.2 square miles (68 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (0.34%) is water.

Climate[edit]

Troy's climate is described as humid subtropical using Köppen climate classification. Troy is typical of areas along the Gulf of Mexico in that it has hot, humid summers and mild winters. (See table below for average temperatures for Troy.)

During the summer and fall, Troy is occasionally affected by tropical storms and hurricanes. The most recent major hurricanes to affect Troy have been Hurricane Opal, Hurricane Ivan, and Hurricane Katrina. Thunderstorms occur throughout the summer, but are most severe in the spring and fall, when destructive winds and tornadoes occasionally occur.

The late winter months will occasionally bring very small sleet/snow showers, with a significant snow storm happening rarely. The last two big snow events to affect Troy were part of the 2010 Southern Snow event and 1993 Storm of the Century.


Climate data for Mobile, Alabama (Mobile Regional Airport, 1971–2000)
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Average high °F (°C)56.6
(13.7)
60.9
(16.1)
69.0
(20.6)
76.6
(24.8)
83.0
(28.3)
88.5
(31.4)
90.0
(32.2)
89.6
(32)
86.1
(30.1)
77.5
(25.3)
68.2
(20.1)
59.9
(15.5)
75.5
(24.2)
Average low °F (°C)34.6
(1.4)
37.0
(2.8)
43.9
(6.6)
51.6
(10.9)
59.3
(15.2)
66.1
(18.9)
69.1
(20.6)
69.1
(20.6)
64.9
(18.3)
53.2
(11.8)
44.2
(6.8)
37.7
(3.2)
52.6
(11.4)
Precipitation inches (mm)4.7
(119)
5.1
(130)
6.2
(157)
4.1
(104)
3.7
(94)
4.4
(112)
5.8
(147)
4.0
(102)
3.4
(86)
2.5
(64)
3.9
(99)
4.9
(124)
52.8
(1,341)
Source: NOAA [4]
Downtown Square in Troy.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
CensusPop.
18701,058
18802,294116.8%
18903,44950.3%
19004,09718.8%
19104,96121.1%
19205,69614.8%
19306,81419.6%
19407,0553.5%
19508,55521.3%
196010,23419.6%
197011,48212.2%
198013,12414.3%
199013,051−0.6%
200013,9356.8%
201018,03329.4%

As of the census[5] of 2010, there were 18,003 people, 7,844 households, and 3,187 families residing in the city. The population density was 531.1 people per square mile (205.0/km²). There were 6,436 housing units at an average density of 245.3 per square mile (94.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 55.00% White, 39.01% Black or African American, 0.40% Native American, 3.36% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.78% from other races, and 1.38% from two or more races. 1.97% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,844 households out of which 20.34% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.6% were married couples living together, 17.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.9% were non-families. 33.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the city the population was spread out with 18.30% under the age of 18, 21.97% from 20 to 24, 12.30% from 25 to 34, 14.04% from 35 to 49, 13.68% who were 50 to 64, and 10.05% 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females there were 86.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.8 males. Of the reported population, 78.2% were born in the state of Alabama. The percentage of foreign-born residents was 2.8% and 16.2% of those individuals were naturalized citizens. [5]

The median income for a household in the city was $25,352, and the median income for a family was $39,601. Males had a median income of $29,190 versus $20,368 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,589. About 17.7% of families and 23.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.5% of those under age 18 and 19.8% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

Major employers[edit]

Employers[edit]

The largest employers in the Troy micropolitan area are Troy University, Lockheed Martin, Sikorsky Aircraft, CGI Group, the Wal-Mart distribution center in nearby Brundidge, Alabama, and the various branches of Sanders Lead, Wiley Sanders Truck Lines, and KW Plastics operations. Troy University's main campus, located in Troy, employs approximately 700 faculty and staff.

Government[edit]

Troy operates under a Mayor-council government system. The city is served by a mayor, who is elected at-large, and a five-member city council which is composed of five single-member districts. Former mayor, Jimmy C. Lunsford, was elected to his first term in 1985. He won re-election each year since until his retirement in 2012, and is the longest serving mayor in Troy history.

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary schools[edit]

Public schools[edit]

Private schools[edit]

Covenant Christian School is a K-6 private school, founded in 1985 as a ministry of the First Presbyterian Church of Troy. New Life Christian Academy is a K3-12 private school that serves students throughout southeast Alabama and utilizes the college-preparatory ABeka curriculum. Pike Liberal Arts School is a K-12 private school in Troy that attracts students not only from the city of Troy, but from throughout Pike County and the surrounding counties.

Hawkins Hall on the Troy University campus.

Higher education[edit]

Media[edit]

Newspaper[edit]

Radio stations[edit]

FM[edit]

AM[edit]

Recreation[edit]

Remnants of the Trojan Oaks Golf Course, which was closed in March 2010 in order to build a new basketball arena for Troy University on the grounds, are still present and are open to the public for practice. The Troy Recreation Center includes one indoor track facility, two racquetball courts, one outdoor 8-lane swimming pool, one indoor heated pool, two high-school size basketball courts, a gymnastics facility, and a sprayground. The Troy Sportsplex features four baseball fields, four softball fields, one soccer field, and a 1.1 mile paved walking trail that winds through the woodlands behind the Sportsplex and Recreation Center. The Lunsford Tennis Complex features twelve lighted tennis courts located on the Troy University campus. Facilities located on University grounds are not open to the public.

Transportation[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Points of interest[edit]

The Johnson Center for the Arts in downtown Troy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.wsfa.com/Global/story.asp?S=14222648
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  4. ^ "Climatography of the United States No. 20 (1971–2000)" (PDF). National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 2004. Retrieved 2010-05-31. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°48′07″N 85°58′02″W / 31.80196°N 85.967317°W / 31.80196; -85.967317