Triumph TR4A

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Triumph TR4A
'67 Triumph TR4A (Auto classique Pointe-Claire '11).JPG
Overview
ManufacturerTriumph Motor Company
Production1965–1967
Body and chassis
ClassSports car
Body style2-door roadster
LayoutFR layout
Powertrain
Engine2,138 cc (2.1 L) I4
Transmission4-speed manual[1]
Dimensions
Wheelbase2,235 mm (88.0 in)[1]
Length3,962 mm (156.0 in)[1]
Width1,473 mm (58.0 in)[1]
Height1,207 mm (47.5 in)[1]
Curb weight1,016 kg (2,240 lb)[1]
Chronology
PredecessorTriumph TR4
SuccessorTriumph TR5
 
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Triumph TR4A
'67 Triumph TR4A (Auto classique Pointe-Claire '11).JPG
Overview
ManufacturerTriumph Motor Company
Production1965–1967
Body and chassis
ClassSports car
Body style2-door roadster
LayoutFR layout
Powertrain
Engine2,138 cc (2.1 L) I4
Transmission4-speed manual[1]
Dimensions
Wheelbase2,235 mm (88.0 in)[1]
Length3,962 mm (156.0 in)[1]
Width1,473 mm (58.0 in)[1]
Height1,207 mm (47.5 in)[1]
Curb weight1,016 kg (2,240 lb)[1]
Chronology
PredecessorTriumph TR4
SuccessorTriumph TR5

The Triumph TR4A was built between 1965 and 1968 by the Triumph Motor Company in the United Kingdom.

The TR4A was an evolution of the TR4, updated with a new chassis. It was hoped the new, but more complex independent rear suspension would address the buying public's desire for more comfortable riding sports cars. This version has an "IRS" badge on the rear. It has been estimated that 75 percent of TR4A were built with IRS.[citation needed] In 1965 the TR4A IRS sold in the UK for approximately £968, with wire wheels being another £36, overdrive £51, heater £13 and seat belts £4each;[2] it sold for just under $2500 in the US.

In response to dealer requests, about 25 percent of TR4As were produced with a solid rear axle option (also called a live axle), similar to the earlier TR4. The TR4A was the first vehicle to offer an option for axle type.[citation needed]

The new suspension eventually proved itself with the buying public and in racing, with three TR4A IRS models posting a team win and finishing 1st, 2nd and 3rd in class at the Sebring 12-hour race of 1966.

In 1968 the TR4A was replaced by the 6-cylinder TR5 (European model with fuel injection) and TR250 (US model with twin carburetors), both of which used the same body design.

In Q1 2011 there were approximately 789 licensed and 153 SORN TR4A's registered with the DVLA.[3][4]

Coachwork[edit]

Like the TR4, the TR4A was also available with the "Surrey Top" hard top system; a weather protection system with rigid rear section including the rear window and removable fabric section over the driver's and passenger's heads. This aesthetically foreshadowed the silhouette of Targa top cars.

Specifications[edit]

Fuel tank: 53.4 L (11.75 imp gal; 14.11 US gal)
Engine sump: 6.2 L (1.36 imp gal; 1.64 US gal)
Gearbox: 0.85 L (0.19 imp gal; 0.22 US gal)
30 to 50 mph (48 to 80 km/h): 8 s
40 to 60 mph (64 to 97 km/h): 8 s
60 to 80 mph (97 to 130 km/h): 11 s

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "1965 Triumph TR4A". carfolio.com. Retrieved 2008-01-01. 
  2. ^ Autocar Magazine, 28 May 1965
  3. ^ "How Many Left web site". www.howmanyleft.co.uk. Retrieved 2011-07-17. 
  4. ^ "Vehicle licensing statistics". Department of Transport. Retrieved 2011-07-17.