Tripping the Rift

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Tripping the Rift
Tripping the Rift Logo.png
Title Card
FormatAnimated series, Science fiction, Sitcom, Black comedy, Blue comedy, Sex comedy
Created byChris Moeller, Chuck Austen
Directed byBernie Denk
StarringStephen Root
Carmen Electra
Maurice LaMarche
Jenny McCarthy
Gina Gershon
Country of originCanada
No. of episodes39
Production
Producer(s)Andrew Makarewicz
Running time20 minutes
Production company(s)CineGroupe
Film Roman
Broadcast
Original channelSci Fi Channel
Space
Teletoon
Original runMarch 4, 2004 (2004-03-04) – 2007
 
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Tripping the Rift
Tripping the Rift Logo.png
Title Card
FormatAnimated series, Science fiction, Sitcom, Black comedy, Blue comedy, Sex comedy
Created byChris Moeller, Chuck Austen
Directed byBernie Denk
StarringStephen Root
Carmen Electra
Maurice LaMarche
Jenny McCarthy
Gina Gershon
Country of originCanada
No. of episodes39
Production
Producer(s)Andrew Makarewicz
Running time20 minutes
Production company(s)CineGroupe
Film Roman
Broadcast
Original channelSci Fi Channel
Space
Teletoon
Original runMarch 4, 2004 (2004-03-04) – 2007

Tripping the Rift is a CGI science fiction comedy television series. It is based on two short animations published on the Internet by Chris Moeller and Chuck Austen. The series was produced by CineGroupe in association with the Sci Fi Channel. It did very well in ratings; however, because Sci Fi didn't have a major 18-34 demographic coming to the network regularly and Sci Fi was not seen as a source of comedy programming, the network decided to postpone ordering more episodes. CineGroupe continued producing the series for the other North American and International broadcasters.[1] The series aired on the Canadian speciality channel Space in 2004. Canada's cartoon network Teletoon has been airing the series since August 2006. The third season aired on Teletoon in 2007, and a feature-length movie version was released on DVD in 2008. Its main character is Chode McBlob.

Many episodes parody or allude to movies, television shows or novels. For example, "23½" makes reference to the series 24 and Snakes on a Plane. In fact, the opening of each of the series' episodes pays homage to three specific science fiction shows and movies; Star Trek (Whip's remote toy), Star Wars (Gus' vacuum), and 2001: A Space Odyssey (the back of T'Nuk's chair).

Origins[edit]

In 1997, Chris Moeller, who was working on King of the Hill and who had been producing animation shorts with Dark Bunny Productions, met Chuck Austen and pitched their idea for a science fiction comedy to animation studio Film Roman. In early 1998 they launched the first pilot Love and Darph on the Internet. The Chode character first appeared in the 1994 short, Wisconsin.[2] In 2001 Film Roman released the Oh Brother teaser for episode 2, and Chris claimed the full version was made, but its release was left up to Film Roman.[3]

Production[edit]

In 2002, CinéGroupe acquired the rights to the five minute short Love and Darph and approached animator Bernie Denk to direct the series, which was produced in association with Sci Fi US. Bernie Denk's team worked in Montreal on preproduction (character design, modeling and textures) while both Montreal and Malaysian teams worked on animation, lighting and compositing. Keyframe animation was chosen for its quality and animating control capabilities.[4]

Setting[edit]

The universe is modeled largely after the Star Trek universe, with references to 'warp drive' and 'transporter' beam technology, occasional time travel, the Federation and the Vulcans. The series also includes elements borrowed from other sources such as Star Wars, 2001: A Space Odyssey and Battlestar Galactica.

The general setting is that known space is politically divided between two superpowers: the Confederation (led by Humans, and a parody of the Federation from Star Trek) and the Dark Clown Empire (a parody of the Galactic Empire from Star Wars). The Dark Clown Empire is a totalitarian, tyrannical police state, led by the evil Darph Bobo. In contrast, the Confederation is technically a democratic and free society, but in practice, is dominated by mega-corporations and bloated bureaucracies. Ultimately, both superpowers end up exploiting and restricting their inhabitants, albeit in different ways. For example, the value placed on life is so commercialized in the Confederation that clearly sentient robots and androids are reduced to essentially slave-status. The Dark Clown Empire practices actual slavery, and while the Confederation does not, most of its inhabitants (including the Human ones) are openly described as living in wage slavery. The only place that anyone can truly be free is in the border region between the two superpowers, which is directly controlled by neither. This borderland is known as "the Rift", hence those outlaws on the fringes of society who cling to their freedom by moving back and forth around the Confederation/Dark Clown Empire border to evade detection are said to be "Tripping the Rift". The series follows one such group of outlaws led by Chode aboard the Spaceship Bob, taking odd-jobs and usually pursuing various get-rich-quick schemes.

Characters[edit]

Episodes[edit]

Pilot[edit]

Season 1[edit]

  1. "God is Our Pilot"
  2. "Mutilation Ball"
  3. "Miss Galaxy 5000"
  4. "Sidewalk Soiler"
  5. "The Devil and a Guy Named Webster"
  6. "Totally Recalled"
  7. "2001 Space Idiocies"
  8. "Power to the Peephole"
  9. "Nature vs. Nurture"
  10. "Aliens, Guns & A Monkey"
  11. "Emasculating Chode"
  12. "Love Conquers All...Almost"
  13. "Android Love"

Season 2[edit]

  1. "Cool Whip"
  2. "You Wanna Put That Where?"
  3. "Honey, I Shrunk the Crew"
  4. "Ghost Ship"
  5. "Benito's Revenge"
  6. "All for None"
  7. "Extreme Chode"
  8. "Roswell"
  9. "Santa Clownza"
  10. "Chode and Bobo's High School Reunion"
  11. "Creaturepalooza"
  12. "Chode's Near-Death Experience"
  13. "Six, Lies and Videotape"

Season 3[edit]

  1. "Chode Eraser"
  2. "Skankenstein"
  3. "To eBay or Not to eBay"
  4. "23 12"
  5. "The Need for Greed"
  6. "Chuckles Bites the Dust"
  7. "Hollow Chode"
  8. "Raiders of the Lost Crock of */@?#!"
  9. "Witness Protection"
  10. "The Son Also Rises"
  11. "Extreme Take-over"
  12. "Battle of the Bulge"
  13. "Tragically Whip"

International broadcasting[edit]

The show aired on Space in Canada and the Sci Fi Channel in the United States in March 2004. Sky One began airing the show in the United Kingdom in early 2005. Space and the Sci Fi Channel aired the second season in the fall of 2005. In Latin America it appeared on Adultswim. In Australia the show appears on the Sci Fi Channel. Re-runs of the show air in Canada on SPACE. In Russia, a music television channel Muz TV aired season 1 & 2 in 2007, and season 3 in early 2008. Currently episode airs on channel 2x2. In Germany, DMAX (TV channel) is showing season 1 & 2 starting in March 2009. In Bulgaria, PRO BG is airing season 1 & 2 starting in September 2009 and season 3 in October 2009. Other major territories include France, Italy, Belgium, Portugal, Sweden, Spain, and Central Europe.[7]

The Movie[edit]

Anchor Bay released the 75 minute unrated Tripping the Rift: The Movie on DVD on March 25, 2008.[8] The story revolves around Chode's birthday party and the events that occur during and after it, all of which prompt his arch nemesis Darph Bobo to dispatch a time-traveling killer clown android to dispatch Chode.

The movie consists of footage from the season three episodes "Chode Eraser", "Skankenstein", "Raiders of the Lost Crock of *@#?!" and "Witness Protection" with new bits of additional footage stitching them together into a loosely cohesive whole.

While the movie was promoted as uncensored, only dialogue was left uncensored, with nudity still obscured by "censored" balloons.

The main DVD extra is "Captain's Log: Making of Tripping the Rift: The Movie".

DVD releases[edit]

All three seasons and the movie are currently available on DVD in North America. Neither version of the original short film has, to date, been officially released to DVD.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Deadbolt interview with president of SyFy David Howe
  2. ^ A chronological history Chris Moeller, Dark Bunny Productions
  3. ^ Dark Bunny blog Chris Moeller, 2002-11-23
  4. ^ Tripping the Rift: Interviews: Director Bernie Denk SadGeezer.com, 2004-04-24
  5. ^ Official website
  6. ^ [1] Urban Dictionary
  7. ^ Official links page to broadcasters
  8. ^ "Tripping the Rift: The Movie". Anchor Bay Entertainment. Archived from the original on 2008-03-03. Retrieved 2008-03-29. 

External links[edit]