Treasure Island, San Francisco

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Treasure Island
Magic Isle[1]
Landform & neighborhood
Wfm yerba buena treasure islands usgs.jpg
Treasure Island is "5,520 feet long by 3,410 feet wide"[1] and has the Treasure Island Marina on the south near Yerba Buena Island (bottom). Built[when?] southeast into the Bay is a man-made breakwater with rip-rap boulders and palm trees.
Treasure Island is the northernmost area of San Francisco's District 6.
Name origin: Treasure Island (novel)
Coordinates37°49′27″N 122°22′16″W / 37.82417°N 122.37111°W / 37.82417; -122.37111 [citation needed]
Board
State Assembly
Jane Kim (Dist. 6)
ZIP Code94130--0.9 sq mi (2.3 km2)[2]
Area code415
FIPS codetbd
GNIS feature IDs[3]236528 (island)
2624152 (bldg 157)
2506912 (Job Corps ctr)
Wikimedia Commons: Treasure Island, California
Websites:
Treasure Island (SFgov.org)
TreasureIslandSF.com
TreasureIslandOnline.net

Events:
TreasureIslandFestival.com
Reference No.987[4]
 
  (Redirected from Treasure Island, California)
Jump to: navigation, search
Coordinates: 37°49′27″N 122°22′16″W / 37.82417°N 122.37111°W / 37.82417; -122.37111
Treasure Island
Magic Isle[1]
Landform & neighborhood
Wfm yerba buena treasure islands usgs.jpg
Treasure Island is "5,520 feet long by 3,410 feet wide"[1] and has the Treasure Island Marina on the south near Yerba Buena Island (bottom). Built[when?] southeast into the Bay is a man-made breakwater with rip-rap boulders and palm trees.
Treasure Island is the northernmost area of San Francisco's District 6.
Name origin: Treasure Island (novel)
Coordinates37°49′27″N 122°22′16″W / 37.82417°N 122.37111°W / 37.82417; -122.37111 [citation needed]
Board
State Assembly
Jane Kim (Dist. 6)
ZIP Code94130--0.9 sq mi (2.3 km2)[2]
Area code415
FIPS codetbd
GNIS feature IDs[3]236528 (island)
2624152 (bldg 157)
2506912 (Job Corps ctr)
Wikimedia Commons: Treasure Island, California
Websites:
Treasure Island (SFgov.org)
TreasureIslandSF.com
TreasureIslandOnline.net

Events:
TreasureIslandFestival.com
Reference No.987[4]

Treasure Island is a man-made landform in San Francisco Bay and a neighborhood of the City of San Francisco. Built 1936-7 for the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition, the island's World’s Fair site is a California Historical Landmark[4] with buildings having been listed on the NRHP, and the island's historical naval station and auxiliary air facility (for airships, blimps, dirigibles, planes and seaplanes) are designated in the Geographic Names Information System.[3]

Geography[edit]

The San Francisco neighborhood that includes Treasure Island extends far into San Francisco Bay and includes a tip of Alameda Island.[5] Yerba Buena and Treasure islands together have a land area[verification needed] of 576.7 acres (233.4 ha) with a 2010 total population of 2,500.[6] Treasure Island and its 900 ft (270 m) causeway[7] total 535-acre (2.17 km2) connected by roadway (e.g., San Francisco Muni's bus 108: "108 Treasure Island") to Yerba Buena Island which has the Transbay Terminal ramps to the middle of Interstate 80's San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge. The island has a marina and will have a bikeway connecting to the Eastern span replacement of the San Francisco – Oakland Bay Bridge when it is completed. Raised walkways circumscribe nearly the entire island along five streets (Avenue of the Palms, Perimeter Road, Avenue N, Pan American World Airways Esplanade and Clipper Cove Way formerly known as 1st Street). The main waterlines under the causeway are backed up by yellow above-ground emergency manifolds to which blue 6-inch (150 mm) diameter hose can be connected from a large hose spool affixed to a San Francisco Public Utilities Commission / SF Water Dept mobile truck dispatched from the SFWD Newcomb Avenue Yard after an earthquake provided the Bay Bridge from SF to Treasure Island is still operational.

History[edit]

Prior to the island's construction by the federal government of the United States, "Yerba Buena Shoals" of rock[1] north of the transbay island had less than 27 ft (8.2 m) clearance and were a shipping hazard.[7] The 400 acres (1.6 km2) island was constructed by emplacing 287,000 STf (2,550,000 kN) of quarried rock "in the shoals" for the island/causeway perimeter "rock walls" (a freshwater reservoir was quarried in the rock of Yerba Buena Island).[7] Approximately 23 ft (7.0 m) of dredged bay sand filled the interior, was mitigated from salt, and then 50,000 cu yd (38,000 m3) topsoil[7] was used for planting 4,000 trees, 70,000 shrubs, and 700,000 flowering plants.[1] Facility construction had begun by 4 March 1937 when 2 hangars were being built.

"On Monday, February 18, 1939, the “Magic Isle”" opened[1] with a "walled city" of several fair ground courts: a central Court of Honor, a Court of the East, a Port of Trade Winds on the south and on the north: a Court of Pacifica, a 12,000 car parking lot, and the adjacent Gayway of 40 acres (16 ha) with thrill rides and shows.[7] The island had a lagoon ("lake of All Nations"), and structures included the "400-foot Tower of the Sun" (with reflecting pools), the International Building, the $1.5M Federal Building, the Hall of Western States, the $800K administration building, various exhibit halls for industries (e.g., "Machinery, Science, and Vacationland"), and two 335 ft × 78 ft (102 m × 24 m) hangars planned for post-exposition use by Pan Am flying boats (e.g., the China Clipper through 1944[4]) using the Port of Trade Winds Harbor later referred to as Clipper Cove between the 2 islands. In addition to Building 2 (Hangar 2) and Building 3 (Hangar 3), remaining exposition buildings include Building 1 (Streamline Moderne architecture) intended after the expo as the Pan American World Airways terminal. The expo's Magic Carpet Great Lawn also remains.)[8]

Military base[edit]

Naval Station Treasure Island began under a 1941[9] war lease as a United States Navy "reception center"[10] and in 1942, the Navy offered to exchange its Mills Field on the San Francisco Peninsula for the island. "The U.S. Navy seized Treasure Island" on April 17, 1942[9] and instead of an island airport, the city built an airport at Mills Field that became the San Francisco International Airport (the naval station closed in 1997). The station had a Naval Auxiliary Air Facility[3] and a Navy/USMC electronics school.[11] The station was identified by the 1991 Base Realignment and Closure Commission, and remaining military structures include Bldg. 600 on Avenue M and 10th Street (former Naval Firefighting School, now SFFD's Treasure Island Training Facility), Bldg. 157 (Navy firehouse built circa 1942) on Avenue D and 10th Street (now SFFD Station 48), and the 20,000 sq ft (1,900 m2) Bldg. 180 by US Naval Station Way & California Ave (now a winery).[12]

SAC radar station
The Treasure Island Radar Bomb Scoring Site (call sign San Francisco Bomb Plot)[13] was a Strategic Air Command (SAC) automatic tracking radar facility established on the island.[specify] Major Posey was the c. 1948 commander[14] of Detachment B (Capt Carlson on 1 August 1949)[15] which evaluated simulated bombing missions on targets in the San Francisco metropolitan area for maintaining Cold War bomber crews' proficiency. A nearby "Stockton Bomb Plot (Det I)" moved to Charlotte in 1950, and the Treasure Island unit was redesignated Detachment 13 in 1951, the year 3 other SAC detachments used a nearby staging/preparation area for deploying via the bay for Korean War ground-directed bombing (cf. the Sacramento Bomb Plot at a McClellan AFB Annex in 1951.)[14] On 16 October 1951, Treasure Island's Det 13 was assigned under March AFB's 3933rd Radar Bomb Scoring Squadron before moving from the island by 10 August 1954 when the 11th RBS Squadron was activated.
Treasure Island beyond Yerba Buena Island's rooftops and trees, which obscure the causeway and marina. The large curved white building (right of center) is the Administration Building (Building 1) which housed the island's museum[16] 1976-97[17] (the museum association's offices returned in 2008.)[16]

Film stages and settings[edit]

From the late 1980s, Treasure Island's old aircraft Hangar 2 (Building 2) and Hangar 3 (Building 3) served as sound stages for film-making and TV, e.g., The Matrix ("bullet time" visual effect), Rent, and "The Pursuit of Happyness".[citation needed] Treasure Island was a film setting of the 1988 Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (Berlin airport scene), 1995 Copycat (private compound), 1997 Flubber, 1998 What Dreams May Come, 1998 Patch Adams, 1998 The Parent Trap and 1999 Bicentennial Man. An establishing shot of the 1954 The Caine Mutiny shows the island to indicate the location of the 18xx trial. For 3 years Treasure Island served as the site of the Battlebots TV show. The offices and penthouse apartment sets in Nash Bridges were located on the island during the show's production (1996–2001).[18] The island was featured as the base of operations for the prototypers in the 2008 Discovery Channel series Prototype This!. One of the warehouses on Treasure Island served as a film setting for an NBC series titled Trauma.

Remediation and redevelopment[edit]

Cleanup crews spent several weeks cleaning the island's coast from the 2007 Cosco Busan oil spill just a few hundred yards from Treasure Island, and the Navy sold[when?] the island to the city for $108 million as part of a redevelopment project. The Administration Building and Hall of Transportation were listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2008. On June 8, 2011, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved new neighborhood development for 19,000 people over the next 20–30 years by Wilson Meany Sullivan, Lennar Urban, and Kenwood Investments.[19] The 2012-2014 US$1.5 billion Treasure Island Development project for up to 8,000 new residences, 140,000 sq ft (13,000 m2) of new commercial and retail space, 100,000 sq ft (9,300 m2) of new office space, 3 hotels, and 300 acres (120 ha) of parks.[20] The island's gas station pumps and canopy were also removed (the island has a high risk of soil liquefaction in an earthquake). All island natural gas, electricity, sewer and water utilities are serviced by the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission.

By December 17, 2010, "Navy contractors had dug up and hauled off 16,000 cubic yards of contaminated dirt, some with radiation levels 400 times the Environmental Protection Agency’s human exposure limits for topsoil."[21] In April 2013, Caesium-137 levels three times higher than previously[when?] recorded were found (the island hosted "radioactive ships from Bikini Atoll atomic tests and [was] a major education center training personnel for nuclear war"[22]---the "USS Pandemonium" (PCDC-1)[23] mockup had begun nuclear training in 1957.[24]

External media
Images
World's Fair montage with tower
Video
World's Fair films (YouTube)

Gallery[edit]

Looking southwest towards San Francisco from the western shore near the old pier. 
Looking north towards the Marin Headlands from the western shore. 
Looking south towards Yerba Buena Island and the Bay Bridge from the western shore. 
The Treasure Island Marina 

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e McGloin, John Bernard. "Symphonies in Steel: Bay Bridge and the Golden Gate". The Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco (SFmuseum.net). Retrieved 2013-10-22. "The Secretary of War approved the request that its execution be undertaken by the Army Corps of Engineers. While a group of such specialists applied their talents to the reclamation of the “Yerba Buena Shoals,” the day-by-day details were efficiently cared for by Colonel Fred Butler, U.S.A., who had years of army engineering experience behind him at this time. The fill to form Treasure Island was obtained by dredging operations; the island covered an area of 400 acres, 5,520 feet long by 3,410 feet wide." 
  2. ^ "94130 Zip Code (San Francisco, California) Profile - homes, apartments, schools, population, income, averages, housing, demographics, location, statistics, sex offenders, residents and real estate info". City-data.com. Retrieved 2012-11-07. 
  3. ^ a b c "Treasure Island (236528)". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-10-25.  "374929N 1222216W...374937N 1222241W"
    "San Francisco Fire Department Station 48 Treasure Island (2624152)". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-10-25.  "Building 157…374931N 1222226W"
    "Treasure Island Job Corps Center (2506912)". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
    "Naval Station Treasure Island (historical)". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
    "Treasure Island Naval Auxiliary Air Facility (historical) (1988803)". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  4. ^ a b c "San Francisco". California Historical Landmarks. Office of Historic Preservation (Parks.CA.gov). Retrieved 2013-10-26. 
  5. ^ "San Francisco Census Tract Outline Map (Census 2000)". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-12-16. 
  6. ^ United States Census, 2010
  7. ^ a b c d e "Workers of the Federal Writers’ Project" (San Francisco WPAs (1938). "Trail Ends for '39ers". Almanac for Thirty-Niners (SFmuseum.net transcription). 
  8. ^ "San Francisco Attractions". SF-Attractions. Retrieved [date needed]. 
  9. ^ a b "Treasure Isle Goes to Navy: City Upset Over Offer, May Dispute Price" (transcript at SFmuseum.net). The San Francicso News. April 17, 1942. Retrieved 2013-10-26. 
  10. ^ "Treasure Island Accord". The Virtual Museum of the City of San Francisco. 
  11. ^ "DEV Charlie Marine Air Support Radar Team". The Korean War Project. 
  12. ^ "The Winery SF". Retrieved 2010-12-02. 
  13. ^ Tim in San Mateo (October 2, 2002). "San Francisco Bomb Plot" (Yahoo groups). Retrieved 2013-10-25. 
  14. ^ a b "3903rd Radar Bomb Scoring Group" (Web Bulletin Board). KoreanWar.org. Retrieved 2013-03-14. "Detachment 13 Radar Bomb Scoring Group, Threaure Island, San Francisco … 2nd Lt. Robert F.(?) Schaller who was in our outfit from about '52 th '53 … 3903 RBS, Treas Island, SF 1948-52…Chief Phillip Martin was assigned to this unit from 1948-1952. The unit was commanded by a Major Posey." 
  15. ^ Martin, S/A Jack S. (SEP 23, 1949). Report of Investigation: Project Grudge (Special Inquiry). Fairfield-Suisun Air Force Base: USAF Office of Special Investigations. http://www.bluebookarchive.org/page.aspx?pagecode=MAXW-PBB7-57&tab=1. Retrieved 2013-10-26. "On 14 September 1949, Captain HOWARD A. CARLSON,12456-A/ Detachment Commander, Detachment B, 3903 Radar Bomb Scoring Squadron, Treasure Island, San Francisco, California,was interviewed and stated that on 1 August 1949, two (2)radar testing devices were released; one (1) at approximately1000 hours, PST, and another at 1400 hours, PST."
  16. ^ a b "Home". Treasure Island Museum Association. Retrieved 2008-07-20. 
  17. ^ "The Museum and Its Collection". Treasure Island Museum Association. Retrieved 2013-12-16. 
  18. ^ SF filming locations for Nash Bridges
  19. ^ Kane, Will (8 June 2011). "S.F. approves Treasure Island plan". The San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved 7 December 2012. 
  20. ^ "Treasure Island : Development Project". Treasure Island Development Authority. Retrieved 11 October 2012. 
  21. ^ Sapunor, Peter (state public health official) date=December 17, 2010. "title tbd" (email).  (quotation published at http://www.zerohedge.com/contributed/2012-08-17/nuclear-radiation-san-francisco%E2%80%99s-treasure-island-we-don%E2%80%99t-need-know-apparent)
  22. ^ Smith, Matt; Mierskowski, Katherine (April 12, 2013). "Soil tests find cesium, linked to cancer risk, up to 3 times higher than previously acknowledged". The Bay Citizen. Retrieved 2013-10-26. "Until the early 1990s, the Navy operated atomic warfare training academies on Treasure Island, using instruction materials and devices that included radioactive plutonium, cesium, tritium, cadmium, strontium, krypton and cobalt. These supplies were stored at various locations around the former base, including supply depots, classrooms and vaults, and in and around a mocked-up atomic warfare training ship – the USS Pandemonium." 
  23. ^ http://www.newspapers.com/newspage/4920537/
  24. ^ http://www.3dbuzz.com/forum/threads/132384-quot-Toxic-Acres-quot-Am-I-Living-in-Presence-of-Harmful-Nuclear-Radiation