Torquil

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Torquil
GenderMasculine
Language(s)English
Origin
Language(s)1. Scottish Gaelic, from Old Norse
2. Norwegian, Swedish, from Old Norse
Word/Name1. SG Torcall, from ON Þorketill
2. Nr, Sw Torkel, from ON Þorketill
DerivationON Þorr + ketill
Meaning"Thor" + "(sacrificial) cauldron"
Other names
Cognate(s)2. Thorkel; Torkil; Torkild; Torkjell
See alsoTorcadall, Torcall
 
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Torquil
GenderMasculine
Language(s)English
Origin
Language(s)1. Scottish Gaelic, from Old Norse
2. Norwegian, Swedish, from Old Norse
Word/Name1. SG Torcall, from ON Þorketill
2. Nr, Sw Torkel, from ON Þorketill
DerivationON Þorr + ketill
Meaning"Thor" + "(sacrificial) cauldron"
Other names
Cognate(s)2. Thorkel; Torkil; Torkild; Torkjell
See alsoTorcadall, Torcall

Torquil is an Anglicised form of the Norwegian and Swedish masculine name Torkel, and the Scottish Gaelic name Torcall. The Scottish Gaelic name Torcall is a Gaelicised form of the Old Norse name Þorketill. The Scandinavian Torkel is a contracted form of the Old Norse Þorketill. This Old Norse name is made up of the two elements: Þorr, meaning "Thor" the Norse god of thunder; and ketill, meaning "(sacrificial) cauldron".[1]

Another meaning of 'kettil' (shettil - Norwegian) or 'kittel' (shittel - Swedish), is HELMET (referring to the shape, and the material used). The combination of the two words, can be interpreted as 'helmet of Thor', or 'The protection of Thor'. Incantations and names are often double in Norse (a type of kenning).

Scandinavian variants of the Torkel include: the Norwegian and Swedish Torkil, Thorkel; the Norwegian Torkjell; the Faroese Torkil; and the Danish Torkil, Torkild.[1]

A variant spelling of the Scottish Gaelic Torcall is Torcull.

A similar Scottish Gaelic given name is Torcadall, which is also Anglicised as Torquil.[2]

Torquil[edit]

Torquhil[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Hanks, Patrick; Hardcastle, Kate; Hodges, Flavia (2006), A Dictionary of First Names, Oxford Paperback Reference (2nd ed.), Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 263, 397, 410, ISBN 978-0-19-861060-1 
  2. ^ MacFarlane, Malcolm (1912), The School Gaelic Dictionary prepared for the use of learners of the Gaelic language, Stirling: Eneas Mackay, p. 148