Tiramisu

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Tiramisu
Dessert
Tiramisu with cholocate sauce at Ferrara in Little Italy, New York City.jpg
Place of origin:
Italy
Region or state:
Veneto
Main ingredient(s):
Savoiardi, egg yolks, mascarpone, cocoa, coffee
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Tiramisu
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Tiramisu
 
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Tiramisu
Dessert
Tiramisu with cholocate sauce at Ferrara in Little Italy, New York City.jpg
Place of origin:
Italy
Region or state:
Veneto
Main ingredient(s):
Savoiardi, egg yolks, mascarpone, cocoa, coffee
Recipes at Wikibooks:
Cookbook Tiramisu
Media at Wikimedia Commons:
Wikimedia Commons  Tiramisu

Tiramisu (from Italian, spelled tiramisù, [tiɾamiˈsu], meaning "pick me up" or "lift me up") is a popular coffee-flavoured Italian dessert. It is made of ladyfingers (Italian: Savoiardi, [savoˈjardi]) dipped in coffee, layered with a whipped mixture of egg yolks, egg whites, sugar and mascarpone cheese, flavoured with cocoa. The recipe has been adapted into many varieties of puddings, cakes and other desserts.[1] Its origins are often disputes between Italian regions such as Veneto, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Piemonte and others, but it is generally accepted that it was created in Veneto (see below).

History[edit]

The recipe of Tiramisù doesn’t exist in cookbooks before the sixties of the twentieth century. This allows to suppose that the Tiramisù as it is now known, is a recent invention. The dictionary of the Italian language Sabatini Coletti traces the first mention of the name Tiramisù in 1980. There is some debate regarding the origin of Tiramisu. Accounts by Carminantonio Iannaccone (as investigated by The Washington Post) establish the creation of Tiramisu by him on 24 December 1969 in Via Sottotreviso while he was head chef at Treviso, near Venice.[2][3] Other sources claim that the dish was first created in Treviso in 1967 by a baker named Roberto Linguanotto and his apprentice, Francesca Valori.[4] [5] Alternatively, it may have originated as a variation of another layered dessert, Zuppa Inglese.[6] It is mentioned in Giovanni Capnist's 1983 cookbook I Dolci Del Veneto,[7] while Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary gives 1982 as the first mention of the dessert.[8] Other sources report the creation of the cake to honour Grand Duke Cosimo III when he visited the city of Siena.[9] In traditional pastry Tiramisù has similarities with other cakes, in particular with the Charlotte, composed of a Bavarian cream surrounded by a crown of ladyfingers and covered by a sweet cream, with the English soup, composed by layers of ladyfingers soaked in the alchermés and / or in the rosolio (a type of liqueur) and custard, with the Turin cake, consisting of ladyfingers soaked in in the rosolio and in the alchermes with a compound made of butter, egg yolks, sugar, milk and dark chocolate, and the Bavarese Lombarda, with which has affinity for the preparation and the presence of certain ingredients such as ladyfingers and egg yolks (cooked ones). In Bavarese are also used butter and rosolio (or alkermes), but not the mascarpone cream and coffee.

The food and wine expert Giuseppe Maffioli, in the magazine "Vin Veneto: rivista trimestrale di vino, grappa, gastronomia e varia umanità del Veneto” (Venetian wine: periodic journal of wine, brandy, gastronomy and varied humanity of Veneto) of 1981, fix the creation of the cake in the end of the '60s, locating it at the restaurant "Alle Beccherie " in Treviso, run by the family Campeol, and invented by a pastry who had worked in Germany, Roberto "Loly" Linguanotto, who wanted to recreate different types of sweets seen in his experience abroad. The name of the Venetian cake "tiramesù" (literally: pulls me up), then translated in Italian "Tiramisù", would have been adopted for its nutritional characteristics, although others claim maliciously that the name is due to aphrodisiac effects. Maffioli identified the tiramisu among the desserts of the Hapsburg Empire, even if, substantially, he defined it as a variant of the English soup. Its propagation has been rapid both in Veneto and in Italy.

Roberto Linguanotto, in an interview, said that the first recipe derives from "sbatudin", that is beaten egg yolk with sugar, commonly used by the rural families as a reconstituent, which was simply added the mascarpone cream. 'Venetian origin of the dessert is generally affirmed in encyclopedias and dictionaries. The lemma tiramisu is identified as a native of Veneto in the text "The dialect words" by Paolo Zolli 1986. On 17 January 2013, the tiramisu was declared official dish of the 6th World Day of Italian Cuisine.

Preparation[edit]

Arranging a layer of Savoiardi biscuits.
Layers of a served tiramisu.

Tiramisu is a layered dessert, consisting of alternating layers of coffee-soaked Savoiardi and a sweet mascarpone cream.

To prepare the Mascarpone cream you need: mascarpone, eggs yolks, egg whites, sugar. Assemble the egg yolks with sugar, stir and then add the mascarpone. Whip the egg whites, when ready stir in the cream of egg yolks, without disassembling the egg whites.

To prepare the biscuit: Soak Savoiardi briefly in espresso or strong coffee.

To assemble the Tiramisù: create a layer of coffee-soaked Savoiardi, a layer of mascarpone cream, another layer of Savoiardi and the another one of mascarpone cream. Cover the last layer with unsweetened cocoa powder.

Countless variations of Tiramisu exist. Some cooks use other cakes or sweet, yeasted breads, such as panettone, in place of ladyfingers.[10] Other cheese mixtures are used as well, some containing raw eggs, and others containing no eggs at all. Marsala wine can be added to the recipe, but other liquors are frequently substituted for it in both the coffee and the cheese mixture, including dark rum, Madeira, port, brandy or Irish Cream.

Alternate Versions and myths[edit]

One of the legends about the birth of tiramisu places its origins in Siena, as sweet prepared on the occasion of a visit of the Grand Duke Cosimo III de 'Medici, known as the " soup of the Duke ." If this version is theoretically compatible with the introduction in Italy of one of the main ingredients of tiramisu, coffee (used as a beverage at the time and in the absence of claims of its use in food), it is not just for the ' use of mascarpone, which is a typical cheese of Lombardy, and the biscuits, biscuits originating in Savoy, both probably little used in pastry Siena between the seventeenth and eighteenth century.

The mascarpone, in particular, rancid quickly and could hardly be stored and transported in a short time from Lombardy to Tuscany. Even the use of raw eggs in a sweet not subject to firing, in the past, presented difficulties, given the high risk of developing the salmonella because of the precarious methods of food preservation existing at that time . In fact, even recently, the poor preservation of its ingredients has highlighted the potential danger . The soup of the duke is not indicated in the classic cookbooks as "Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well" by Pellegrino Artusi. Unlike what happens in Siena, where he is not among the products considered typical of the area, including a missing pudding which have similar characteristics to tiramisu, tiramisu today is recognized as sweet prince of the province of Treviso. Among the restaurants who is credited with its authorship include also the Treviso "El Toula" and "Al Foghèr." Another theory says that the cake was created by a pastry chef in Turin to support the Count of Cavour in its efforts to unify Italy . Even at the time the unit of Italian production methods and food preservation could not guarantee the wholesomeness of this kind of sweet, and also for this case there was no evidence to support sources .

Among those who claim to have created the tiramisu also appears to be a certain Carminantonio Iannaccone, currently residing in the United States, which, in an article in the Washington Post in 2007, claims to have invented in the 70s when he was in Treviso. This version referential and free from any source has been disproved by the magazine " Gastronauta ", which he attributed, also, the father of the cake at the restaurant " At Beccherie ." Recent news reports say that the cake was invented in Carnia in the 50s. A Pieris, in Gorizia, states that a similar sweet was served from the '40s in the then famous restaurant " Il vetturino " . Recently there have been some claims about the origins of tiramisu by a family from Tolmezzo in the province of Udine. In particular, the family-Pielli Del Fabbro claims to have evidence that this typical dessert has been created and invented by her mother Norma Pielli in the fifties. Elements and documentary evidence, in the possession of the Del Fabbro, attest and demonstrate that paternity and that is why the heirs will start the procedure to obtain European certification.

Original characteristics[edit]

To prepare it according to the original recipe you need the following ingredients: finger biscuits, egg yolks, sugar, coffee, mascarpone cheese and cocoa powder. In the original recipe there are no liquor and egg whites. The original shape of the cake is round, although the shape of the biscuits favors the use of a rectangular or square pan, spreading the classic image "to tile". However, it is also often assembled in round glasses, which show the various layers, or pyramid. Modern versions have as a rule the addition of whipped cream and / or whipped egg combined with mascarpone cream, in order to make it lighter, thick and foamy. Among the most common alcoholic changes includes the addition of Marsala. The cake is usually eaten cold, having spent at least 2 hours in the refrigerator.

Another variation involves the preparation of the cream with eggs mounted in a water bath, in order to pasteurize them and lengthen its storage. Over time, replacing some of the ingredients, mainly coffee, there arose numerous variants such as tiramisu with chocolate, strawberry, amaretto, berry, lemon, strawberry, pineapple, yogurt, banana, raspberry, coconut and even beer.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Tiramisu Bread Puddings". bhg.com. Meredith Corporation. Retrieved 31 October 2013. 
  2. ^ "Piedigrotta: History". Retrieved 14 March 2010. 
  3. ^ Black, Jane (10 July 2007). "The Trail of Tiramisu". The Washington Post. Retrieved 11 July 2007. 
  4. ^ Capnist, Giovanni (2003). Italian Cuisine: A Cultural History (Arts and Traditions of the Table: Perspectives on Culinary History). ISBN 02-3112-232-2. 
  5. ^ "What gave the Tiramisu its name?". Ticino Online. Retrieved 1 October 2013. 
  6. ^ "History of tiramisù". Retrieved 16 August 2010. 
  7. ^ Capnist, Giovanni (1983). I Dolci Del Veneto. ISBN 88-7021-239-4. 
  8. ^ "Tiramisu". Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary. Retrieved 14 March 2010. 
  9. ^ Francesco Soletti, Ettore Toscani L'Italia del caffè, 2004, p. 110.
  10. ^ Larousse Gastronomique, New York: Clarkson Potter Publishers, 2001, pp. 1214.