Tintinnabulation

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Tintinnabulation is the lingering sound of a ringing bell that occurs after the bell has been struck. This word was invented by Edgar Allan Poe as used in the first stanza of his poem The Bells. [1]

From Edgar Allan Poe's "The Bells"[edit]

Date: c1845

 Hear the sledges with the bells - Silver bells! What a world of merriment their melody foretells! How they tinkle, tinkle, tinkle, In the icy air of night! While the stars that oversprinkle All the heavens, seem to twinkle With a crystalline delight; Keeping time, time, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells From the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, bells, bells - From the jingling and the tinkling of the bells. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Poe, Edgar Allen. "The Bells". The Bells. 

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tintinnabulation