Times Square Tower

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Times Square Tower
General information
TypeOffice[1]
Location7 Times Square, New York City, United States[2]
Coordinates40°45′20″N 73°59′12″W / 40.7555°N 73.9867°W / 40.7555; -73.9867Coordinates: 40°45′20″N 73°59′12″W / 40.7555°N 73.9867°W / 40.7555; -73.9867
Construction started2002[1]
Completed2004[2][1]
Height
Roof724 ft (221 m)[2][1]
Top floor685 ft (209 m)[1]
Technical details
Floor count47[2]
Lifts/elevators20[1]
Design and construction
ArchitectDavid Childs[2] of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
DeveloperBoston Properties[2]
Structural engineerThornton Tomasetti[2]
 
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Times Square Tower
General information
TypeOffice[1]
Location7 Times Square, New York City, United States[2]
Coordinates40°45′20″N 73°59′12″W / 40.7555°N 73.9867°W / 40.7555; -73.9867Coordinates: 40°45′20″N 73°59′12″W / 40.7555°N 73.9867°W / 40.7555; -73.9867
Construction started2002[1]
Completed2004[2][1]
Height
Roof724 ft (221 m)[2][1]
Top floor685 ft (209 m)[1]
Technical details
Floor count47[2]
Lifts/elevators20[1]
Design and construction
ArchitectDavid Childs[2] of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill
DeveloperBoston Properties[2]
Structural engineerThornton Tomasetti[2]

Times Square Tower is a 47-story, 726-foot (221 m) office tower located at 7 Times Square in Manhattan, New York City, standing at West 41st Street.[2]

Started in 2002 and completed in 2004, the tower contains Class A office space.[2][1] Some of the most prominent features of the Times Square Tower are its billboards, several of which hang on the building's façade.[1] Most of the large signs are found near the base, but one 4-story sign is found above the middle of the building. Towards the end of 2011, an electronic billboard replaced the static billboard towards the top of the tower.[1] The building is also known for the zig-zag patterns on its exterior.

Originally, this building's tenant was planned to be Arthur Andersen.[1] The firm signed a lease in October 2000, but then backed out in 2002 after the Enron scandal.[1][3]

Tenants

References

See also