Timeline of the presidency of John F. Kennedy

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Presidency of John F. Kennedy
John F. Kennedy, White House color photo portrait.jpg
35th President of the United States
In office
January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963
Vice PresidentLyndon B. Johnson
Preceded byDwight D. Eisenhower
Succeeded byLyndon B. Johnson
Personal details
BornJohn Fitzgerald Kennedy
(1917-05-29)May 29, 1917
Brookline, Massachusetts
DiedNovember 22, 1963(1963-11-22) (aged 46)
Dallas, Texas
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Jacqueline Lee Bouvier Kennedy
ChildrenArabella Kennedy
Caroline Bouvier Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr.
Patrick Bouvier Kennedy
Alma materHarvard University
OccupationNaval officer, politician
ReligionRoman Catholicism
Signature
 
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Presidency of John F. Kennedy
John F. Kennedy, White House color photo portrait.jpg
35th President of the United States
In office
January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963
Vice PresidentLyndon B. Johnson
Preceded byDwight D. Eisenhower
Succeeded byLyndon B. Johnson
Personal details
BornJohn Fitzgerald Kennedy
(1917-05-29)May 29, 1917
Brookline, Massachusetts
DiedNovember 22, 1963(1963-11-22) (aged 46)
Dallas, Texas
NationalityAmerican
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Jacqueline Lee Bouvier Kennedy
ChildrenArabella Kennedy
Caroline Bouvier Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Jr.
Patrick Bouvier Kennedy
Alma materHarvard University
OccupationNaval officer, politician
ReligionRoman Catholicism
Signature

The following is a timeline of the Presidency of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, also known as the Kennedy Administration, which took place from his inauguration on January 20, 1961, to his assassination on November 22, 1963, a span of 1,036 days. The timeline also includes major events preceding and succeeding his presidency.

The timeline begins on January 2, 1960, just over a year before Kennedy's inauguration on January 20, 1961, when then-Senator John F. Kennedy first announced his intention to run for the Democratic nomination for President of the United States, and concludes on November 25, 1963, just three days after his assassination in Dallas, Texas abruptly ended his Presidency, when the slain President Kennedy's funeral was held, attended by representatives from over 90 countries.

After Kennedy's assassination, in accordance with Constitutional procedure in the case of the death of the President, his Vice President, Lyndon B. Johnson, succeeded to the Office of the Presidency and took the oath of office of the President of the United States aboard Air Force One less than an hour after Kennedy died. Johnson served out the remainder of Kennedy's term, and was elected to the Presidency in his own right in a landslide in the 1964 presidential election, setting an electoral victory result which has not been exceeded by a Democratic presidential nominee since.

Kennedy was the first Catholic President, the youngest elected President (Theodore Roosevelt, who succeeded to the Presidency after William McKinley's assassination, was younger), and the fourth President to be assassinated.

Pre-presidency[edit]

1960[edit]

January[edit]

Kennedy's second draft of his written remarks announcing his presidential candidacy, January 2, 1960.
See also Works related to Statement of Senator John F. Kennedy Announcing His Candidacy for the Presidency of the United States at Wikisource

July[edit]

September[edit]

September 26: Senator Kennedy and Vice President Nixon participate in the first television presidential debate.

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

December 6: President-elect Kennedy meets with President Dwight D. Eisenhower.[14]

1961[edit]

January[edit]

January 20: John F. Kennedy is inaugurated as the 35th President of the United States.
January 21:The Cabinet is sworn in by Chief Justice Earl Warren.
January 25: President Kennedy holds the first regular live televised press conference in the State Department Auditorium.

February[edit]

March[edit]

March 1: Kennedy establishes the Peace Corps.

April[edit]

May[edit]

May 25: Kennedy sets out the goal to "land a man on the Moon and return him safely to the Earth".
May 5: President Kennedy, Jackie Kennedy, and Vice President Johnson watch the launch of Freedom 7 from the White House Situation Room.
May 5: Alan Shepard becomes the first American in space, when he is launched aboard a Mercury-Redstone Launch Vehicle on Freedom 7.
May 6: President Kennedy meets with Alan Shepard at the White House.

September[edit]

1962[edit]

February 20: John Glenn is launched into space on Friendship 7 and becomes the first American to orbit the Earth.

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

May[edit]

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September 12: President Kennedy declares "we choose to go to the Moon in this decade" during a speech on the nation's space program at Rice University.
See also Works related to We choose to go to the Moon at Wikisource
September 12: President Kennedy visits Rice University to deliver a speech on the nation's space program.

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December 12: President and Mrs. Kennedy standing next to the White House Christmas tree, located in the Entrance Hall.

December[edit]

1963[edit]

January[edit]

January 14: President Kennedy delivers his third and final State of the Union address.

February[edit]

March[edit]

June[edit]

June 26: President Kennedy delivers his now-famous Ich bin ein Berliner speech.
June 11: Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach confronts Alabama Governor George Wallace after Wallace refuses to allow the Court-ordered admittance of African–American students to the University of Alabama. After the confrontation, the students are admitted peacefully.
June 10: President Kennedy delivers the commencement address at American University.

August[edit]

August 28: Martin Luther King delivers his I Have A Dream speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

September[edit]

October[edit]

Kennedy and his son John, Jr. walk at the White House, October 1963.
October 7: President Kennedy signs the Partial Test Ban Treaty, a major milestone in early nuclear disarmament, despite occurring in the Nuclear Age.

November[edit]

Post-presidency[edit]

November 1963[edit]

November 23: Kennedy lies in repose in the East Room of the White House.
November 22: Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson is sworn in aboard Air Force One as the nation's 36th President hours after the Kennedy assassination.

References[edit]

  1. ^ John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. "John F. Kennedy Fast Facts: Announcement as Candidate for President, January 2, 1960". jfklibrary.org. 
  2. ^ University of Virginia Miller Center of Public Affairs. "Acceptance of the Democratic Party Nomination (July 15, 1960)". millercenter.org. 
  3. ^ W.H. Lawrence (July 15, 1960). "Johnson is Nominated for Vice President; Kennedy Picks Him to Placate the South". nytimes.com. 
  4. ^ National Public Radio (December 5, 2007). "Transcript: JFK's Speech on His Religion". npr.org. 
  5. ^ Public Broadcasting Service American Experience. "Biography: 35. John F. Kennedy". pbs.org. 
  6. ^ New York Times (September 26, 2011). "Sept. 26, 1960: First Televised Presidential Debate". nytimes.com. 
  7. ^ Commission on Presidential Debates (2012). "October 7, 1960 Debate Transcript: The Second Kennedy-Nixon Presidential Debate". debates.org. 
  8. ^ Commission on Presidential Debates (2012). "October 13, 1960 Debate Transcript: The Third Kennedy-Nixon Presidential Debate". debates.org. 
  9. ^ Commission on Presidential Debates (2012). "October 21, 1960 Debate Transcript: The Fourth Kennedy-Nixon Presidential Debate". debates.org. 
  10. ^ John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum. "Campaign of 1960". jfklibrary.org. 
  11. ^ Associated Press; Cornell University (November 9, 1960). "Nixon Talks to Supporters, Virtually Concedes Defeat". cornell.edu. 
  12. ^ Russell D. Renka; Southeast Missouri State University (March 1, 2010). "The 1960 Kennedy v. Nixon Election". semo.edu. 
  13. ^ St. Bonaventure University (April 5, 2013). "1960 Election". sbu.edu. 
  14. ^ a b "December 1960 Chronology - Eisenhower Presidential Papers - Eisenhower Memorial Commission". Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial. February 1, 2006. Retrieved January 9, 2010. 
  15. ^ United States Congress Joint Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies. "Swearing-In Ceremony for President John F. Kennedy Forty-Fourth Inaugural Ceremonies, January 20, 1961". senate.gov. 
  16. ^ Yale University Law School. "Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy". yale.edu. 
  17. ^ Whealan, Ronald E. (October 30, 2005). "January 21, 1961". John F. Kennedy Library. Retrieved January 9, 2010. 
  18. ^ "NASA Langley Research Center's Contributions to the Apollo Program". Langley Research Center. November 21, 2004. Retrieved January 10, 2010. "Answering President Kennedy's challenge and landing men on the moon by 1969 required the most sudden burst of technological creativity, and the largest commitment of resources ($24 billion), ever made by any nation in peacetime. At its peak, the Apollo program employed 400,000 Americans and required the support of over 20,000 industrial firms and universities." 
  19. ^ "Robert C. Seamans Jr.". Massachusetts Institute of Technology. June 10, 2009. Retrieved January 10, 2010. "President Kennedy had been convinced that America needed to send a man to Mars and back before the decade was out. Bob [Seamans] told me the story of working three days and nights trying to put together, clearly and succinctly, the case for the President that we cannot hit that goal, we need to go to the Moon." 
  20. ^ Riechmann, Deb (2008-07-29). "Bush: Former Army cook's crimes warrant execution". ABC News. Associated Press. Retrieved 2008-07-29. 
  21. ^ Whealan, Ronald E. (2005-12-05). "March 22, 1962 - The White House Diary". John F. Kennedy Library. Retrieved 2009-08-28. [dead link]
  22. ^ Whealan, Ronald E. (2006-01-19). "Kennedy Legislative Record, Page 2 - Summary of the Three Year Kennedy Record (Legislation)". John F. Kennedy Presidential Library. Retrieved 2009-08-28. 
  23. ^ "Norton Letter to U.S. Attorney Says Death Penalty Trial That Begins Today Part of Troubling and Futile Pattern". Office of Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton. 2007-01-08. Retrieved 2009-08-28. 
  24. ^ J. F. Kennedy (February 20, 1963). "Victor Harry Feguer -- Petition for Commutation of Death Sentence". The Smoking Gun. Archived from the original on January 9, 2010. Retrieved January 9, 2010. "I have reviewed your letter of January 21 regarding the application for clemency in behalf of Mr. Feguer. Taking all factors into account, it is my decision that the petition should be and is hereby denied." 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the National Archives and Records Administration document "The White House Diary".

External links[edit]