Timeline of African-American Civil Rights Movement

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This is a timeline of African-American Civil Rights Movement.

Contents

Pre-17th century

(Information in this section primarily taken from Slavery in Colonial United States.)

1565

17th century

1619

1640

1654

1662

1672

1676

18th century

1705

1712

1739

1760

1770

1773

1774

1775

1776–1783 American Revolution

1777

1780

1787

1788

1790–1810 Manumission of slaves

1791

1793

1794

19th century

1800–1859

Early 19th century

1800

1807

1808

1816

1820

1821

1822

1829

1830

1831

1832

1833

1837

1839

1840

1842

1843

1847

1849

1850

1852

1853

1854

1855

1856

1857

1859

First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation – President Lincoln meets with his cabinet.

1860–1874

1861

1862

1863–1877 Reconstruction

1863

1864

1865

1866

1867

1868

1870

1871

1872

1873

1874

1875–1899

1875

1876

1877

1879

1880

1881

1882

1883

1884

1886

1887

1890

1892

1895

1896

1898

1899

20th century

1900–1924

1900

1901

1903

1904

1905

1906

1907

1908

1909

1910

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1923

1924

1925–1949

1925

1926

1928

1929

1930

1931

1932

1934

1935

Jesse Owens wins gold medals in front of Hitler.

1936

1937

1938

1939

1940s to 1970

1940

1941

1942

1943

1944

1945–1975 Second Reconstruction/American Civil Rights Movement

1945

1946

1947

1948

1950–1959

For more detail during this period, see Freedom Riders website chronology

1950

1951

1952

1953

1954

1955

Rosa Parks pictured in 1955

1956

1957

1958

1959

1960–1969

For more detail during this period, see Freedom Riders website chronology

1960

1961

1962

1963

1964

The Edmund Pettus Bridge on "Bloody Sunday" in 1965.

1965

1966

1967

1968

1969

1970–2000

1970

1971

1972

1973

1974

1975

1976

1977

1978

1979

1982

1983

1984

1986

1987

1988

1989

1990

1991

1992

1994

1995

1997

1998

2000

21st century

2001

2003

2005

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

See also

Other books

Government

Other people

Authors and artists

Athletes

Performers

Activists and organizers

Footnotes

  1. ^ "Slavery and Indentured Servants". Library of Congress, American Memory. http://international.loc.gov/ammem/awhhtml/awlaw3/slavery.html. Retrieved 31 July 2010. 
  2. ^ "John Punch". PBS. http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/experience/responses/spotlight.html. Retrieved 31 July 2010. 
  3. ^ "The American Revolution and Slavery", Digital History accessed 5 March 2008
  4. ^ Peter Kolchin, American Slavery: 1619–1877, New York: Hill and Wang, pp.78 and 81
  5. ^ PBS documentary
  6. ^ The Life of Josiah Henson, Formerly a Slave, Now an Inhabitant of Canada, as Narrated by Himself: Electronic Edition. [1] page58
  7. ^ Wormley, G. Smith."Prudence Crandall", The Journal of Negro History Vol. 8, No. 1, Jan. 1923.
  8. ^ "Connecticut's "Black Law" (1833)". Citizens All (project). Yale University. http://www.yale.edu/glc/citizens/stories/module4/documents/black_law.html. Retrieved 2012-03-19. "Lacking no legal means to prevent Prudence Crandall from opening her school, Andrew Judson, a local politician, pushed legislation through the Connecticut Assembly outlawing the establishment of schools 'for the instruction of colored persons belonging to other states and countries.'" 
  9. ^ "Morehouse Legacy". www.morehouse.edu. Morehouse College. http://www.morehouse.edu/about/legacy.html. Retrieved 16 March 2012. 
  10. ^ John C. Willis, Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta after the Civil War, Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2000
  11. ^ James D.Anderson, Black Education in the South, 1860–1935, Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina, 1988, pp.244–245
  12. ^ Frum, David (2000). How We Got Here: The '70s. New York, New York: Basic Books. p. 41. ISBN 0-465-04195-7. 
  13. ^ Wolgemuth, Kathleen L. (April 1959). "Woodrow Wilson and Federal Segregation". The Journal of Negro History (Association for the Study of African-American Life and History, Inc.) 44 (2): 158–173. doi:10.2307/2716036. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2716036?seq=1. 
  14. ^ Blumenthal, Henry (January 1963). "Woodrow Wilson and the Race Question". The Journal of Negro History (Association for the Study of African-American Life and History, Inc.) 48 (1): 1–21. doi:10.2307/2716642. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2716642?seq=1. 
  15. ^ Angela Y. Davis,Women, Race & Class. New York: Vintage Books, 1983, pp.194–195
  16. ^ "America's First Sit-Down Strike: The 1939 Alexandria Library Sit-In". City of Alexandria. http://oha.alexandriava.gov/bhrc/lessons/bh-lesson2_reading2.html. Retrieved 2009-08-20. 
  17. ^ "DIVINE'S FOLLOWERS GIVE AID TO STRIKERS; With Evangelist's Sanction They 'Sit Down' in Restaurant". New York Times (US). 1939-09-23. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FA0A17FA3B54107A93C1AB1782D85F4D8385F9. Retrieved 2010-07-20. "[The workers] are seeking wage increases, shorter hours, a closed shop and cessation of what they charge has been racial discrimination." 
  18. ^ Smith v. Allwright, 321 U.S. 649 (1944)
  19. ^ Morgan v. Virginia, 1946
  20. ^ David T. Beito and Linda Royster Beito, Black Maverick: T.R.M. Howard's Fight for Civil Rights and Economic Power, Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2009, pp.154-55.
  21. ^ The Virginia Center for Digital History
  22. ^ Clayborne Carson (1998). The autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr. Grand Central Publishing. p. 141. ISBN 978-0-446-52412-4. http://books.google.com/?id=GvuO5Yr1W_sC&pg=PA141&q. 
  23. ^ a b c d The King Center, The Chronology of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.. "1961". Archived from the original on October 13, 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20071013062550/http://www.thekingcenter.org/mlk/chronology.html. Retrieved 2007-10-20. 
  24. ^ Arsenault, Raymond (2006). Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice. Oxford Univ. Press. p. 439. ISBN 0-19-513674-8. 
  25. ^ a b c d Branch, Taylor (1988). Parting the Waters: America in the King Years. Simon & Schuster Paperbacks. pp. 527–530. ISBN 978-0-671-68742-7. 
  26. ^ Branch, pp.533–535
  27. ^ Branch, pp. 555–556
  28. ^ Branch, pp. 756–765
  29. ^ Branch, pp. 786–791
  30. ^ UNITED STATES of America and Interstate Commerce Commission v. The CITY OF JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI, Allen Thompson, Douglas L. Lucky and Thomas B. Marshall, Commissioners of the City of Jackson, and W.D. Rayfield, Chief of Police of the City of Jackson, United States Court of Appeals Fifth Circuit, May 13, 1963.
  31. ^ Medgar Evers.
  32. ^ Proposed Civil Rights Act.
  33. ^ March on Washington.
  34. ^ a b Loevy, Robert. "A Brief History of the Civil Rights Act of 1964". http://faculty1.coloradocollege.edu/~bloevy/CivilRightsActOf1964. Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  35. ^ a b Civil Rights Act of 1964
  36. ^ Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.
  37. ^ a b c Gavin, Philip. "The History PlaceTM, Great Speeches Collection, Lyndon B. Johnson, "We Shall Overcome"". http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/johnson.htm. Retrieved 2007-12-31. 
  38. ^ When Harry Met Petula
  39. ^ James Ralph, Northern Protest: Martin Luther King, Jr., Chicago, and the Civil Rights Movement (1993) Harvard University Press ISBN 0-674-62687-7
  40. ^ Patrick D. Jones (2009). The Selma of the North: Civil Rights Insurgency in Milwaukee. Harvard University Press. pp. 1–6, 169ff. ISBN 978-0-674-03135-7. http://books.google.com/books?id=Wk2NylFxF4sC&pg=PA1. 
  41. ^ http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2004/fall/channels-2.html
  42. ^ Bob Jones University v. United States, 461 U.S. 574 (1983)
  43. ^ CNN: Bob Jones University ends ban on interracial dating
  44. ^ CNN: Obama: I will be the Democratic nominee

External links