Timecop

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - View original article

Timecop

Theatrical release poster
Directed byPeter Hyams
Produced byMoshe Diamant
Sam Raimi
Robert G. Tapert
Screenplay byMark Verheiden
Story byMike Richardson
Mark Verheiden
Based onComics:
Mike Richardson
Mark Verheiden
StarringJean-Claude Van Damme
Mia Sara
Ron Silver
Gloria Reuben
Music byMark Isham
Robert Lamm
CinematographyPeter Hyams
Editing bySteven Kemper
StudioLargo Entertainment
JVC Entertainment
Dark Horse Entertainment
Renaissance Pictures
Distributed byUniversal Pictures (theatrical)
Warner Bros. (current holders)
Release date(s)
  • September 16, 1994 (1994-09-16)
Running time98 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
BudgetUS$27 million[1]
Box office$103,646,581
 
  (Redirected from Time Cop)
Jump to: navigation, search
Timecop

Theatrical release poster
Directed byPeter Hyams
Produced byMoshe Diamant
Sam Raimi
Robert G. Tapert
Screenplay byMark Verheiden
Story byMike Richardson
Mark Verheiden
Based onComics:
Mike Richardson
Mark Verheiden
StarringJean-Claude Van Damme
Mia Sara
Ron Silver
Gloria Reuben
Music byMark Isham
Robert Lamm
CinematographyPeter Hyams
Editing bySteven Kemper
StudioLargo Entertainment
JVC Entertainment
Dark Horse Entertainment
Renaissance Pictures
Distributed byUniversal Pictures (theatrical)
Warner Bros. (current holders)
Release date(s)
  • September 16, 1994 (1994-09-16)
Running time98 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
BudgetUS$27 million[1]
Box office$103,646,581

Timecop is a 1994 science-fiction thriller film directed by Peter Hyams and co-written by Mike Richardson and Mark Verheiden. Richardson also served as executive producer. The film is based on Time Cop, a story written by Verheiden and drawn by Phil Hester and Chris Warner which appeared in the anthology comic Dark Horse Comics, published by Dark Horse Comics.

The film stars Jean-Claude Van Damme as a police officer in 1994 and a U.S. Federal agent in 2004), when time travel has been made possible. It also stars Ron Silver as a rogue politician and Mia Sara as the agent's wife. The story follows an interconnected web of episodes in the agent's life (or perhaps lives) as he fights time-travel crime and investigates the politician's unusually successful career.

Timecop remains Van Damme's highest grossing film (his second to break the $100,000,000 barrier for a worldwide gross) as a lead actor. (2011's Kung Fu Panda 2 grossed over $665 million, but featured him in a very small role.) It is generally regarded as one of Van Damme's better films by critics, even those who usually deride his acting.

Contents

Plot

In 1994, the Time Enforcement Commission (TEC) is created, with an oversight committee led by Senator Aaron McComb (Silver), to combat the misuse of the recent discovery of time travel, most often using the phenomena for monetary gain. A D.C. police officer, Max Walker (Van Damme), accepts a position as a TEC Agent, but that evening, his home is invaded by unknown men who shoot Walker (but he is saved by his bulletproof vest), and the house is destroyed by an explosion, killing his wife Melissa (Sara).

Ten years later, Walker apprehends his former TEC partner Lyle Atwood (Schombing), who admits that he was working to raise money through the 1929 U.S. stock-market crash to support McComb's run for the presidency. McComb's plan, apparently, is to become so rich that as President, he will be able to act on his own accord without becoming just another corporate puppet. However, on return to the present, Atwood refuses to talk, having been threatened by McComb with the murder of his ancestors, which would wipe Atwood from history. With no options, Walker returns Atwood to 1929 where he falls to his death. Haunted by his inability to go back in time to save his wife, as using time travel for one's own desires is obviously forbidden by the TEC, Walker vows to stop McComb from succeeding.

Walker is set up with a new partner, Sarah Fielding (Reuben), and tasked to investigate a problem in 1994. There, they find the young McComb dropping his partnership with computer chip businessman Jack Parker - which cost the current-day McComb a fortune. McComb from the future arrives, and kills Parker, ensuring that he alone controls the company. Fielding reveals herself as a double agent for McComb, forcing Walker to flee. In the chase, the older McComb shoots and wounds Fielding before disappearing back to the future. Walker returns to 2004, where reality as Walker knows it as changed; TEC is being decommissioned, and as a result of Parker's death, McComb has profited greatly from the chip company, allotting him enough funds to virtually assure his presidency. With all records of Fielding gone in order to remove any witnesses to McComb's crimes, Walker commandeers the original time sled prototype to return to 1994 with help from his superior, Matuzak (McGill).

In 1994, Walker finds Fielding at a local hospital, and convinces her to testify against McComb. While trying to find evidence of Fielding's existence in 1994, Walker finds a sample of Melissa's blood, indicating that she is pregnant. He realizes the present date was the day of his wife's murder, and sees it as his chance to avert it. When he goes to collect Fielding, he finds she has been murdered. With no other allies, Walker seeks out Melissa at the local mall and convinces that he is himself from the future, securing her help to protect the younger version of Walker.

Walker from the future is present when young Walker returns home that evening. Walker recognizes McComb's men, and with Melissa's help, knocks them out, though the younger Walker is still knocked out cold outside the house. In the confusion, McComb from the future arrives, takes Melissa hostage, and plants a bomb in the home. It is then that Walker realises McComb was behind his wife's death, having travelled back to kill Walker as a young man after making an enemy of him in 2004. Though McComb himself died in the explosion, his younger self lived on and would still be guaranteed the Presidency.

Walker plays his trump card: the 1994 version of McComb arrives, having received an anonymous message from Walker to come by. In the ensuing scuffle, McComb shoots Melissa, but Walker grabs the younger McComb and pushes him into his older self; due to laws of time travel, the same matter cannot occupy the same space at the same time. As such, the two McCombs fuse into a mass of blood which disintegrates into nothing, destroying McComb once and for all. Walker and Melissa escape the house before the bomb explodes. Walker leaves Melissa with his younger self and then returns to his present.

Back in 2004, he finds the timeline has been restored for the better; TEC is back to full strength under a new Senator's oversight, McComb mysteriously vanished ten years prior, and Fielding and Matuzak are alive. Walker returns to his home and is surprised to find Melissa and his 8-year old son happily waiting to greet him, with news that Melissa is pregnant again.

Cast

Reception

Timecop was released on September 16, 1994, where it opened at the number 1 spot with $12,064,625 from 2,228 theaters and a $5,415 average per theater.[2][3] In its second week, it took the top spot again with $8,176,615.[4] It finished its run with $45 million in total U.S. Overseas, it grossed about $58 millions, with a total gross of $103 million. This makes it Van Damme's highest-grossing film in which he starred, and his second to make over $100 million (after Universal Soldier).

Critics were mixed on Timecop, citing its various plot holes and inconsistencies.[5] Roger Ebert called Timecop a low-rent Terminator.[6] Richard Harrington of the Washington Post said, "For once, Van Damme's accent is easier to understand than the plot." David Richards of the New York Times disparaged Van Damme's acting and previous films but called Timecop "his classiest effort to date".[7] Timecop currently holds a 44% rating on Rotten Tomatoes based on 39 reviews.

The film made Entertainment Weekly's Underrated Films list in November 2010, mostly because of Van-Damme's acting.[8]

Home Media Release

Timecop was released on DVD in 1998. Two separate versions were released, a 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen and fullscreen.[citation needed] The widescreen release is identified with the title on the front cover having green lettering, whereas the fullscreen is red and white.[citation needed] Both versions however only have a runtime of 94 minutes, 4 minutes shorter than the theatrical version.

The DVD Extras include Production Notes, Theatrical Trailer and Cast & Filmmaker's Notes.

A Blu-ray of the film was released as a double feature for both this and Bloodsport from Warner Home Video on September 14, 2010, which has the full uncut 98 minute version in 2.35:1 anamorphic widescreen, but no extra features.

Spinoffs

The film, which was originally based on a comic, was adapted into a two-issue comic book series.

A TV version of the same name was spun off, running for nine episodes in 1997 on ABC.[9] It starred T.W. King as Jack Logan and Cristi Conaway as Claire Hemmings.

Timecop 2: The Berlin Decision, a direct-to-DVD sequel was released in 2003, starring Jason Scott Lee and Thomas Ian Griffith, and directed by Steve Boyum.[10]

A game based on the movie was developed by Cryo Interactive and released on the SNES in 1995.[11]

A series of tie-in novels by author Dan Parkinson published in 1997–1999 featured the Jack Logan character from the television series.

In 2010, Universal announced a reboot of the film.[12]

References

  1. ^ "Van Damme very determined". Hartford Courant. http://articles.courant.com/1994-09-16/features/9409210865_1_action-director-john-woo-movie-scripts. Retrieved 2010-11-27. 
  2. ^ "Weekend Box Office : An Arresting Opening for TimeCop". Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1994-09-20/entertainment/ca-40950_1_weekend-box-office. Retrieved 2012-06-13. 
  3. ^ Kleid, Beth (1994-09-26). "MOVIES". The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1994-09-26/entertainment/ca-43133_1_quiz-show. Retrieved 2010-08-31. 
  4. ^ Kleid, Beth (1994-09-26). "MOVIES 'Timecop' on Top: It's "Timecop" time again.". The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1994-09-26/entertainment/ca-43133_1_quiz-show. Retrieved 2010-11-08. 
  5. ^ "A Giant Leap For Van Damme In `Timecop'". Hartford Courant. http://articles.courant.com/1994-09-16/features/9409210923_1_time-enforcement-commission-van-damme-s-max-walker-timecop. Retrieved 2010-11-25. 
  6. ^ "Roger Ebert review of ''Timecop''". Rogerebert.suntimes.com. 1994-09-16. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19940916/REVIEWS/409160303/1023&template=printart. Retrieved 2011-02-09. 
  7. ^ Richards, David (1994-09-04). "FILM; Jean-Claude Van Damme, the, uh, Actor?". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1994/09/04/movies/film-jean-claude-van-damme-the-uh-actor.html?scp=4&sq=jean%20claude%20van%20damme&st=cse. Retrieved 2010-08-08. 
  8. ^ "12 Underrated Movie Gems". Entertainment Weekly. http://www.ew.com/ew/gallery/0,,20441981_2,00.html. Retrieved 2010-11-25. 
  9. ^ Lowry, Brian (1996-10-25). "ABC Invests $15 Million in 'Timecop'". The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1996-10-25/entertainment/ca-57615_1_abc-show. Retrieved 2010-08-31. 
  10. ^ "Timecop 2: The Berlin Decision". Cinefantastique. http://cinefantastiqueonline.com/2010/07/timecop-2-the-berlin-decision/. Retrieved 2010-11-28. 
  11. ^ "Timecop". Moby Games. http://www.mobygames.com/game/snes/timecop. Retrieved 2010-11-28. 
  12. ^ Josh Wigler. "'TimeCop' Reboot In The Works, Jean-Claude Van Damme 'Won't Be Invited Back'". http://moviesblog.mtv.com/2010/09/20/timecop-reboot-in-the-works-jean-claude-van-damme-wont-be-invited-back. 

External links