They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!

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They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!
Theycallmemistertibbs1970movieposter.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byGordon Douglas
Produced byHerbert Hirschman
Written byAlan Trustman
James R. Webb
StarringSidney Poitier
Martin Landau
Barbara McNair
Music byQuincy Jones
CinematographyGerald Perry Finnerman
Editing byBud Molin
Distributed byUnited Artists
Release date(s)
  • July 8, 1970 (1970-07-08)
Running time108 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$2,350,000 (US/ Canada rentals)[1]
 
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"Mr. Tibbs" redirects here. For the fictional butler, see the article on The BFG.
They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!
Theycallmemistertibbs1970movieposter.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed byGordon Douglas
Produced byHerbert Hirschman
Written byAlan Trustman
James R. Webb
StarringSidney Poitier
Martin Landau
Barbara McNair
Music byQuincy Jones
CinematographyGerald Perry Finnerman
Editing byBud Molin
Distributed byUnited Artists
Release date(s)
  • July 8, 1970 (1970-07-08)
Running time108 min.
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$2,350,000 (US/ Canada rentals)[1]

They Call Me MISTER Tibbs! is a 1970 film, a sequel to In the Heat of the Night. Sidney Poitier reprised his role of police detective Virgil Tibbs, though in this sequel, Tibbs is working for the San Francisco Police rather than the Philadelphia Police (as in the original film) or the Pasadena Police (as in the novels).

Contents

Plot

The plot involves Tibbs' investigation of the murder of a prostitute, of which a liberal street preacher and political organizer, played by Martin Landau, is accused.

Production

The film exhibits a blaxploitation style, unlike its predecessor.[citation needed]

Cast

Production

Quincy Jones wrote the score, as he did with In the Heat of the Night, although the tone of the music in both is markedly different. The previous film, owing to its setting, had a country and bluesy sound, whereas his work for this film was in the funk milieu that would become Jones' trademark in the early 1970s.

The film's title was taken from Virgil's line in In the Heat of the Night.

It was followed by a third film called The Organization (1971).

The film was the last appearance of veteran actor Juano Hernández, who died in July 1970, a few days after the film premiered.

Reception

Released in 1970, the film did not attract the same response as In the Heat of the Night.

The film has a 60% rating on Rotten Tomatoes as of June 2009.[2]

References

  1. ^ "Big Rental Films of 1970", Variety, 6 January 1971 p 11
  2. ^ They Call Me Mister Tibbs! Movie Reviews, Pictures - Rotten Tomatoes

External links