Theron Metcalf

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Theron Metcalf
Theron Metcalf (1784-1875).jpg
Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court
In office
1848–1865
Appointed byGeorge N. Briggs
Preceded byVacant
Succeeded byJames Colt
Personal details
Born(1784-10-16)October 16, 1784
Franklin, Massachusetts, U.S.
DiedNovember 3112, 1875(1875-11-3112) (aged 91)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Spouse(s)Julia Tracy Metcalf
RelationsUriah Tracy
ChildrenGeorge Tracy Metcalf
William Pitt Metcalf
Julia Metcalf
ParentsHanan Metcalf
Mary (Allen) Metcalf
ResidenceDedham, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
Alma materBrown University
Litchfield Law School
Harvard University
ProfessionAttorney
Politician
 
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Theron Metcalf
Theron Metcalf (1784-1875).jpg
Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court
In office
1848–1865
Appointed byGeorge N. Briggs
Preceded byVacant
Succeeded byJames Colt
Personal details
Born(1784-10-16)October 16, 1784
Franklin, Massachusetts, U.S.
DiedNovember 3112, 1875(1875-11-3112) (aged 91)
Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.
Spouse(s)Julia Tracy Metcalf
RelationsUriah Tracy
ChildrenGeorge Tracy Metcalf
William Pitt Metcalf
Julia Metcalf
ParentsHanan Metcalf
Mary (Allen) Metcalf
ResidenceDedham, Massachusetts
Boston, Massachusetts
Alma materBrown University
Litchfield Law School
Harvard University
ProfessionAttorney
Politician

Theron Metcalf (October 16, 1784 – November 12, 1875) was an American attorney and politician from Massachusetts. He was a New England jurist and served as an Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

Biography[edit]

Metcalf was born in Franklin, Massachusetts, the son of Hanan Metcalf and Mary (Allen) Metcalf.[1] He graduated from Brown University in 1805, and studied law at the Litchfield Law School after graduation. He was admitted to the bar in Massachusetts in 1807, and moved to Dedham, Massachusetts in 1809 to practice law.[2] Metcalf edited the Dedham Gazette from 1813-1819.[3] He served as Norfolk County Attorney for twelve years, until the position was eliminated.[4]

Political career[edit]

Drawing of Theron Metcalf

In 1815, he was appointed Reporter of Contested Elections for that year.[5] In 1831, 1833 and 1834 he served as a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives, and was chairman of the Judiciary Committee.[6] He opened a law school in Dedham in 1828 where he gave lectures.[7] Brown gave him the degree of LL.D. in 1844, and Harvard University did the same in 1848.[8]

He was appointed Reporter of the Massachusetts Supreme Court in 1839, and sat on the bench of that court from February 24, 1848 until his resignation on August 31, 1865.[9] His annotations were considered valuable for their philosophical investigation and discriminating analysis.

In 1832 and 1847, he was elected a fellow of Brown University.[10] He delivered an address before the Phi Beta Kappa Society of Brown in 1832,[11] and in 1840 delivered the 4th of July oration at Dedham.[12] Metcalf donated a set of fifty volumes of ordination sermons that he had collected to Brown University.[13]

Metcalf died in Boston, Massachusetts on November 12, 1875.[14]

Family life[edit]

On November 5, 1809 he married Julia Tracy, daughter of United States Congressman Uriah Tracy.[15] Metcalf and his wife had three children: George Tracy Metcalf, William Pitt Metcalf and Julia Metcalf.[16][17]

Published works[edit]

His publications include:

Edited works[edit]

His edited works include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Theron Metcalf". Ancestry.com. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  2. ^ New England Historic Genealogical Society (1907). New England Historic Genealogical Society. The Society. p. 185. 
  3. ^ "Theron Metcalf". Litchfield Historical Society. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Theron Metcalf". The Official Website of the Massachusetts Judicial branch. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  5. ^ Massachusetts. General Court. House of Representativesa and, Metcalf, Thomas (1816). Reports of Contested Elections, in the House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for the Year 1815. Abel D. Alleyne, printer. p. 3. 
  6. ^ "Theron Metcalf". The Official Website of the Massachusetts Judicial branch. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  7. ^ Blake, Mortimer (1879). A History of the Town of Franklin, Mass: From Its Settlement to the Completion of Its First Century, 2d March, 1878; with Genealogical Notices of Its Earliest Families, Sketches of Its Professional Men, and a Report of the Centennial Celebration. Committee of the Town. p. 173. 
  8. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1900). History of the Judiciary of Massachusetts: Including the Plymouth and Massachusetts Colonies, the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and the Commonwealth. Boston Book Company. p. 191. 
  9. ^ Davis, William Thomas (1900). History of the Judiciary of Massachusetts: Including the Plymouth and Massachusetts Colonies, the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, and the Commonwealth. Boston Book Company. p. 191. 
  10. ^ Blake, Mortimer (1879). A History of the Town of Franklin, Mass: From Its Settlement to the Completion of Its First Century, 2d March, 1878; with Genealogical Notices of Its Earliest Families, Sketches of Its Professional Men, and a Report of the Centennial Celebration. Committee of the Town. p. 173. 
  11. ^ New England Historic Genealogical Society (1907). New England Historic Genealogical Society. The Society. p. 185. 
  12. ^ Wilson, James Grant and Fiske, John (1888). Appletons' Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Volume 4. D. Appleton. p. 311. 
  13. ^ U.S. Government Printing Office (1850). Congressional Serial Set. U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 57. 
  14. ^ Herringshaw, Thomas William (1914). Herringshaw's National Library of American Biography: Contains Thirty-five Thousand Biographies of the Acknowledged Leaders of Life and Thought of the United States; Illustrated with Three Thousand Vignette Portraits. American Publishers' Association. p. 166. 
  15. ^ Godey, Louis Antoine and Hale, Sarah Josepha Buell (1876). Godey's Magazine, Volume 93. Godey Company. p. 566. 
  16. ^ "Julia Metcalf". Litchfield Historical Society. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Theron Metcalf". Litchfield Historical Society. Retrieved April 22, 2014. 

External links[edit]


Legal offices
Vacant
Title last held by
Marcus Morton
Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court
1848-1865
Succeeded by
James Colt